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View Full Version : Rotisserie chicken... Help!


Sam_Wheat
09-11-2011, 01:23 PM
So the family wants me to cook one today. It's 11:22am is it too late for dinner? Please help with ingredients and tips. I have the kettle rotisserie. How long does it need to cook for?

tamadrummer
09-11-2011, 01:44 PM
Needs to cook till 180 degrees in the thigh/breast meat.

Ingredients: montreal chicken rub by McCormick's will make a killer chicken! That or some Zatarain's creole seasoning or Tony Chachere's. I would also think about putting some butter under the skin after you season it up to make it nice and crispy when it comes out.

Ron_L
09-11-2011, 01:56 PM
Set up the kettle for indirect (lit charcoal piles on each side) with a drip pan in the middle. That should give you a temp around 350. the actual time depends on the bird, but at 350 a 3-4 lb. bird should be done in 60 - 90 minutes, may up to two hours. You're looking for 155 in the breast and 165 in the thigh. You can put a bag of ice on the breast for 30 minutes or so before cooking. That way the breast will start out colder than the thighs and the two should be done close to each other.

twinsfan
09-11-2011, 02:15 PM
Ron, never heard that ice tip, that's farking genious!

Sammy_Shuford
09-11-2011, 02:25 PM
Ron said it all!

mbshop
09-11-2011, 02:36 PM
yea, i love the iced breast method. i use only birds that weigh 3lb's. i cook the brest till it gets to 160 deg and they always come out great.

tamadrummer
09-11-2011, 02:47 PM
To eat poultry safely you have to take it to 180 minimum. Does the carryover take it far enough? I have never heard of icing a bird while cooking. Educate me please, prOn of the iced birdy would probably even be better for all us NoooooOoOOObs that haven't seen these tricks.

Sam_Wheat
09-11-2011, 02:54 PM
I believe he meant ice Approximately 30 min before the cook. Thanks for the help! Much appreciated.

Paul

gtr
09-11-2011, 02:59 PM
You could brine the bird with 1/4 cup salt, 1/4 cup sugar mixed into a gallon of water (make sure the water is cold for safety - maybe put some ice in) - throw a little of whatever rub you're using in there too. Brine it for a couple hours (in the fridge!), then pat dry and let the bird sit in the fridge uncovered for an hour. If you don't have that much time, just get as close as you can. If you don't have time to wet brine, then hit that bird with either seasoned salt, or kosher (or sea) salt and let sit uncovered in the fridge for an hour or 2. Then cook - Ron's got ya covered on that. I'm a 165 guy myself - but I usually run over that 'cause I'm lazy and disorganized - but it does turn out good!

What brining the bird will do is make it more tender, juicy, and more flavorful. Also the bird will be more forgiving if you take it a little too hot.

Bottom line is - you're not too late by any means. Backtime 1 1/2 or 2 hours from dinner, having the bird rest a little (loosely tented) is a good thing.

Good luck!

Ron_L
09-11-2011, 03:00 PM
To eat poultry safely you have to take it to 180 minimum. Does the carryover take it far enough?

That's actually outdated information. Here is the latest safe minimum cooking temperatures from foodsafety.gov...

http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/charts/mintemp.html

Poultry minimum is 165.

As far as icing the breast, I first learned about it from the Mad Max turkey recipe on the Naked Whiz web site...

http://www.nakedwhiz.com/madmaxturkey.htm

Ron_L
09-11-2011, 03:01 PM
I believe he meant ice Approximately 30 min before the cook. Thanks for the help! Much appreciated.

Paul

Yes. I did say before cooking. See below (emphasis added)

Set up the kettle for indirect (lit charcoal piles on each side) with a drip pan in the middle. That should give you a temp around 350. the actual time depends on the bird, but at 350 a 3-4 lb. bird should be done in 60 - 90 minutes, may up to two hours. You're looking for 155 in the breast and 165 in the thigh. You can put a bag of ice on the breast for 30 minutes or so before cooking. That way the breast will start out colder than the thighs and the two should be done close to each other.

landarc
09-11-2011, 03:04 PM
I cook poultry to 150-160 range all of the time, never a problem. I buy good poultry from a safe source and have not seen any issues. Keeping the ice bag in place on the rotuisserie, now that would be problematic :becky:

BobBrisket
09-11-2011, 03:13 PM
Ron said it all. You have more than enough time to get it done for dinner. You could also spatch it and save on the time having to put it on the rotiss.

Ron_L
09-11-2011, 03:20 PM
Ron said it all. You have more than enough time to get it done for dinner. You could also spatch it and save on the time having to put it on the rotiss.

I was going to suggest that, but since his wife wanted rotisserie I didn't want to cause marital strife :-D

BobBrisket
09-11-2011, 03:22 PM
I was going to suggest that, but since his wife wanted rotisserie I didn't want to cause marital strife :-D

True dat!:becky:

Sam_Wheat
09-11-2011, 04:42 PM
Do I need butchers twine? Or can I just spear it? This is the setup I have ...

http://www.gardenandleisure.com/prodimages/large/weber_charcoal_rotisserie_l.jpg

Ron_L
09-11-2011, 05:15 PM
I normally tie the legs and thighs to keep them from flapping while the bird spins. It also helps to keep them from getting singed.

Carbon
09-11-2011, 05:22 PM
You can pick up some 100% cotton twine at Home Depot for a couple of bucks and use that.