PDA

View Full Version : lump vs. kingsford


grill 'em all
08-25-2011, 08:08 PM
i see lots of yall singin the praises of lump charcoal here..i've never tried it.. being that wally world is just 7 miles from my home,its too easy just to snag a bag of kingsford and haul tail..i dont know anywhere that offers lump in my area..whats the pros/cons of lump? national chains carry it? would it be worth my time/effort to seek it out? any ideas?:confused:

Whitfield
08-25-2011, 08:12 PM
Walmart over here sells small bags of Royal Oak lump ~7-8 lbs.

Boshizzle
08-25-2011, 08:17 PM
Lump doesn't (shouldn't) have all the additives that charcoal has. So, a lot of people like the flavor it imparts better than charcoal since it's more like using all wood to cook with plus it usually produces less ash.

However, every time I try lump no matter what the brand I get all kinds of ugly looking crap in it from pieces that are obviously lumber to metal cans to insulation.

IMO, the price/quality/consistency of charcoal makes it a better choice for me. But, who knows, maybe one day I will find some lump that is real wood with no trash or lumber in it and I will learn to like it.

JS-TX
08-25-2011, 08:23 PM
Bo, that's been my experience with RO lump. True Cue has been good to me, a little harder to light but better stuff overall. I've heard Wicked Good is pretty good but it's not sold around here..

Boshizzle
08-25-2011, 08:27 PM
Bo, that's been my experience with RO lump. True Cue has been good to me, a little harder to light but better stuff overall. I've heard Wicked Good is pretty good but it's not sold around here..

There is a place in my town that sells Wicked Good but it's like $2.50 a pound which makes a 10 lb bag about $25.00. It just costs too much around here for me to try.

HubFlyer
08-25-2011, 08:33 PM
Wicked Good Weekend Warrior has been my choice for a while now. As opposed to charcoal it definitely burns longer, and more importantly, leaves less ash.

El Ropo
08-25-2011, 09:23 PM
I like B&B Oak Lump. It burns real nice, good sized chunks, and imparts a slight oak flavor on the meat, with no weird sparking or flavoring. When using Lump, I like to break it down to smaller, more even sized pieces using a cordless sawzall and circular saw. Or sometimes, i'll just cut it down into smaller chunks (similar to briquette sized pieces) by using a hammer and cold chisel :)

Pack it in, and get really even burns with little ash build up. I'll still start the fire with 12-15 regular briquettes, so they don't fall through the chimney and create a mess.

Matt_A
08-25-2011, 09:56 PM
Do you have a Lowe's nearby? The Lowe's near me sells hardwood lump in 10lb bags.

Blackened
08-25-2011, 10:08 PM
Burns hotter, better for grilling imo, not so much in a vertical smoker though imo

El Ropo
08-25-2011, 10:33 PM
I've used straight lump in my UDS with great results, it's all how your prepare it and manage the fire. I prefer smoking at higher temps, so it doesn't bother me in the least if the cooking temp is closer to 300 than 225.

JS-TX
08-25-2011, 10:36 PM
B&B oak lump is good stuff. HEB's own hardwood lump is not bad either.

Hoss
08-25-2011, 11:06 PM
Lump is the ONLY way to go in a ceramic cooker.Much less ash,it is pure.Briquettes are a lotta fillers and crap.Lump burns hotter and faster and cleaner.You just gotta learn how to use it.Given,there are less quality lump out there just as it is less quality briquettes also.Buy quality and learn how to use it no matter which way you decide to go.FYI Royal Oak bags their lump for BGE.Ozark Oak is the BEST I ever tried.WG is OK but WAYYYYYY overpriced.

El Ropo
08-25-2011, 11:12 PM
B&B oak lump is good stuff. HEB's own hardwood lump is not bad either.

I've used HEB Lump quite often as well, it's pretty good, as long as the bag wasn't run over by a truck before stocking. I've had one bag that was really small pieces, but about 5 others that were just fine. No junk, and it doesn't crackle and pop like cowboy.

Ismellsmoke
08-25-2011, 11:34 PM
When I see a "manufactured" product costing more than a "organic", lump or raw chunks. it's a no brainer.
I just found out that a client of mine's neighbor is in the "Kingsford" family.

RedPig
08-26-2011, 03:17 AM
I've used both briquettes and lump and here are my observations: Lump is hardwood burned in a low oxygen atmosphere. What remains is basically a chunk of wood now in carbon form. For a long time it's all I would use because my cooker of choice was my BGE. The briquettes like Kingsford and others that use binders, clay or whatever, leave a pile of ash and filler behind. If I'm doing a long burn on my BGE it's apt to clog the holes at the bottom and kill my fire. Today, I still prefer lump for the BGE but the problem is finding a lump that is dead-on consistent bag-after-bag. I've gone away from Cowboy, Stubbs and Royal Oak because of quality issues. I've tried Wicked Good, but it's too expensive. I'm using Kingsford blue and comp briquettes now. The quality is consistent, although I don't like all the fillers. At least I know I'll get repeatable results using them. If I'm competing, I certainly don't want to risk the chance of getting a bad bag of lump and ruining my food.

captndan
08-26-2011, 06:02 AM
Make your own lump and all the problems go away.

Zippylip
08-26-2011, 07:05 AM
depends on what you're cooking. I can get much hotter fires with lump as opposed to briquettes. If I'm baking or searing, I go with lump. For mid-range grilling down to low temp, briquettes are great. Lump also works in all temperature ranges, but I find briquettes to be a little more even when spread out in a kettle. As someone above mentioned, if you're cooking in ceramic, you really don't have much of a choice. The far lower ash content of lump makes it the way to go. As a side note & not that there's any effect on cooking, when you first light up lump it has a horrid aroma, kind of like diesel fuel or something. Briquettes by contrast come right out of the gate smelling great, though some may disagree. Easiest way to deal with the whole situation is to have an huge supply of each on hand then you've got all bases covered :becky:

Riverside BBQ
08-26-2011, 07:20 AM
I mix lump and briquttes. It's a good compromise for me. Get the benefits of both. Depending on what it is I'm smoking depends on the ratio of the mix.

NCGrimbo
08-26-2011, 10:24 AM
Here's what I know. To make lump charcoal, you get some wood and some barrels, one smaller than the other, put wood in smaller barrel, stick smaller barrel into larger barrel, make a fire int the larger barrel and after a while take lump charcoal out of smaller barrel. (Over simplified description)

For making charcoal briquettes: http://videos.howstuffworks.com/discovery/28129-how-its-made-charcoal-video.htm Note the additives. Do you want that on your food?

gtr
08-26-2011, 10:40 AM
Might be worth mentioning that hardwood briquettes are also an option, like Rancher, RO briqs, etc. I've been using the Trader Joe's briqs (rebadged Rancher) in my UDS & have found it easier to maintain consistent temps than with RO lump - I've only been cooking on it a couple months, though, so I'm not finished experimenting. I always have both lump and briqs around in order to meet different needs for different types of cooks.

I also got some interesting stuff called Charcos (online order). It's these little rectangle briqs made out of coconut shells - they burn farking hot and long and not much ash at all. Phubar uses coconut shell charcoal and we all know the results he gets. :thumb:

basuraman
08-26-2011, 11:06 AM
Might be worth mentioning that hardwood briquettes are also an option, like Rancher, RO briqs, etc. I've been using the Trader Joe's briqs (rebadged Rancher) in my UDS & have found it easier to maintain consistent temps than with RO lump - I've only been cooking on it a couple months, though, so I'm not finished experimenting. I always have both lump and briqs around in order to meet different needs for different types of cooks.


I have seen that TJ's charcoal and been wondering. I may try it. There is a TJ's 6 blocks from me.

Smokey Al Gold
08-26-2011, 12:39 PM
I've used HEB Lump quite often as well, it's pretty good, as long as the bag wasn't run over by a truck before stocking. I've had one bag that was really small pieces, but about 5 others that were just fine. No junk, and it doesn't crackle and pop like cowboy.


I agree with the HEB lump being pretty good as long as you get a bag thats not crushed. I also use b&b with good results. The best results have been mesquite lump from the mexican meat markets or this great stuff I get from the valley in unmarked bags. I can taste the difference in food I cook with lump and food i cook with regular k. I'm not knocking regular k I like it too for its consistency and even burning.

gtr
08-26-2011, 12:44 PM
I have seen that TJ's charcoal and been wondering. I may try it. There is a TJ's 6 blocks from me.

I think you'll like it - it's hardwood and doesn't have all the fillers and stuff of regular briqs - I think they use cornstarch as a binder. You kinda get the higher heat and lower ash advantage of lump along with the more steady/predictable burn of a briq. Good price, too.

big easy
08-27-2011, 07:39 AM
kingsford makes a lump called steak house, they sell at menards, $5.95 for 8lbs. I have found it to be good, I always pour out and seperate the chunks, and haven't found the ugly stuff I have found in others,( plywood, plastic, metal...)

PimpSmoke
08-27-2011, 08:10 AM
As a side note & not that there's any effect on cooking, when you first light up lump it has a horrid aroma, kind of like diesel fuel or something. Briquettes by contrast come right out of the gate smelling great, though some may disagree. Easiest way to deal with the whole situation is to have an huge supply of each on hand then you've got all bases covered :becky:

I would say I am in the not agree camp. I think K smells disgusting when you light it, binders and fillers and fusel chemical smells. The Grove lump I use smells like wood, and that's it. The only briqs I have used that didn't smell bad when lighting were the ones Harbormaster uses, not sure what they are, but they are natural.

For me it's all about low ash and high heat output for the amount of space in the firebox. I have a leaky, non-insulated cooker and need that extra heat. Downside, it burns fast and needs to be replenished sooner than briqs.

forgiven
08-27-2011, 06:06 PM
Yesterday for my 1st ever smoke I tried Stubbs briquettes. I bought it at Lowe's. It looked fine in the UDS basket until I lit it. After I lit it it turned to mush. Fortunatly there was still some Kingsford left in the basket left over from my test burn and I had a bag of Cowboy Lump I added after the Stubbs failed. It ended out fine. I kept the Stubbs dry in my garage closet and I bought it from inside the Lowes store. I would like to try the K. Comp. but I can't find it.

hav
08-27-2011, 06:53 PM
Lump produces less ash, I use it in my BGE and my UDS. Not my kettles or WSM, my theory being that they are not as air-tight and the lump goes out of control.

BlueHowler
08-27-2011, 07:01 PM
I mix lump and briquttes. It's a good compromise for me. Get the benefits of both. Depending on what it is I'm smoking depends on the ratio of the mix.

That's the same way I roll. Kingsford Competition briqs and whatever lump I can find at a low price.

If I'm doing a long low and slow cook like for a brisket the mix is around 30% briqs and 70% lump. If the cook is hot and fast like for chicken I like 60% briqs and 40% lump. This is all eyeballed so the measurements are not exact.

The reason I use more briqs with a hot and fast cook is that I can reach the higher temps that I want faster and hold the temps better.

With more lump in a low and slow cook I can keep the temps lower without a lot of spikes.

Gore
08-27-2011, 07:23 PM
However, every time I try lump no matter what the brand I get all kinds of ugly looking crap in it from pieces that are obviously lumber to metal cans to insulation.


Usually it is concrete, but every once in a while you find something really cool, like a petrified mouse or lizard. Personally, I look at it the same way as the prizes in the Cracker Jacks. The worst prize I had was about a 10 lb. piece of concrete. It was an especially heavy bag, so I was expecting something really special. That turned out to be a bit of a disappointment, but usually the prizes are pretty good. :thumb:

Fiddy/Fiddy
08-28-2011, 04:51 AM
I have tried several types of Briquettes and I just can't stand working with them. The stink is just hard to bear and the neighbors have pretty sour looks on their faces every time I have lit up some briquettes in the Chimney.

I have a Weber Kettle and I had to double up on the charcoal grates to keep it from falling through during cooks. It is a bit of a fight to get the lump into the right temp zone for longer cooks. I just did my first beer can chicken today and first half an hour was a nightmare. I had to hit the coals with the Looftlighter for a second time to get the temp back to 350 F. Playing around with the vents, I was able to get it to hold the temp steady at 350 F. I used a mix of Left over Royal Oak and new Maple Leaf Lump.

I may put the fire to one side next time. I found using the two indirect steel cooking boxes made it harder to keep the temp up. Putting the Lump to one side should make the fire easier to manage for multiple task. I can always give the yard burn a turn at the one hour mark to keep the cook even.

I tried using Blue bag Kingsford for some Chicken breast back in June. It made the meat taste bitter. This is the thing I hate the most about briquettes. I just can't figure out an method to use them without loosing sweetness in the meat.

gambler
08-28-2011, 10:28 AM
...I just did my first beer can chicken today and first half an hour was a nightmare.
...I may put the fire to one side next time. I found using the two indirect steel cooking boxes made it harder to keep the temp up.

I use the two piles of charcoal method without those steel cooking boxes. What I do is: I place a 13x9 disposable baking pan in the center of the Weber Kettle, and put the charcoal on either side of that. I use a mix of Stubb's All Natural hardwood briquettes, and lump charcoal and two pretty good sized apple wood chunks. I put a chunk of the apple wood in each pile of charcoal. I also pour on can of beer in the pan as well as the cans the chickens sit on. I do have a heavy one directional wind almost every day here where I live. So one side of the kettle always gets hotter than the other. What I do is turn my kettle around 180 degrees every half hour. This helps to keep the temps even on both sides. I have taken my Kettle to a few other homes to do my famous beer can chicken, and without that wind constantly blowing on one side of the grill, I don't have to spin it around to get even cooking temps. So inherently the grill should cook even, unless you get a constant wind blowing on one side like I do

Soybomb
08-28-2011, 12:14 PM
The way I look at it is that kingsford is going to be very consistent and lump will be very responsive. I can change the fire temperature of lump very fast, K seems to want to stick where its at. That means I can get inferno hot cooks for steak easily with lump, but K might hold a steadier temp for smoking. Bricquettes also produce a great deal of ash that can be a pain to keep from smothering your fire.

I have both in my garage. The lump usually comes out for hot and fast grilling, the K usually is used as a cheap fuel for low and slow.