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BruceB
08-24-2011, 01:48 PM
Has anyone ever tried marinating St. Louis trimmed spare ribs and do you think it's worthwhile or not?

TheMidnightSmoker
08-24-2011, 02:02 PM
I dont see the point myself. A good dry rub should be all thats needed IMHO.

Hannzo
08-24-2011, 02:05 PM
Don't do it. My buddy marinated some spare ribs....brought them over and threw them on the smoker. They were the worst ribs ever to come off my smoker. I'm sure it had to do more with what he marinated them in rather just the marinating itself...but still. Dry rubs all the way.

deguerre
08-24-2011, 03:47 PM
I love a really good asian rib and those are marinated.

GrillinFool
08-24-2011, 03:51 PM
I asked myself the same question. I also added brining to the equation and did a blind taste test. Here was the test. I took three half slabs of baby backs and slathered one in a rub, one I marinated in apple cider, garlic, and black pepper, and the third I did in apple cider, garlic, black pepper and salt (a basic brine). I put all three in separate ziplocks in the fridge overnight.

The next day I rinsed off the ribs in the marinade and brine and patted them dry and applied the exact same rub that was on the first slab of ribs. Then I cooked all three identically. I've done this experiment twice now. Once on my in-laws (who, God Bless them, are my guinea pigs a lot) and then on my dad. Each time the tasting was done blind. The tasters had no idea which rib was brined, marinated or rubbed. All they saw was three identical looking ribs.

The results were the same every time. The ribs with the rub were good, the marinated ribs were much better and the brined ribs were even better but not heads and shoulders better than the marinating. The simple results were a marinade improved the ribs a great deal over a rub, and even a rub that was applied the night before.

Prior to this I'd marinated a few times and brined a couple times and really couldn't tell if there was a difference from my ribs that I only did a rub on. But with no control group, it's very hard to compare apples to apples. Once I did them side by side, the results were startling. I brine every single time now. Doing them side by side is the only true way to judge the results.

But that's just me. Maybe you will do the experiment and come up with different results. I wasn't sure myself which is why I did the experiment a second time, but after the second experiment, I'm sold.

JS-TX
08-24-2011, 03:53 PM
I believe there is a recipe for marinating ribs in Myron Mixon's book, but I have yet to try it myself.

Rusted Truck Ranch
08-24-2011, 03:58 PM
Great post. Thanks for the results of the taste test.

eddieh70301
08-24-2011, 04:02 PM
i am one who marinates ribs. but i just soak them in dr pepper or cherry dr pepper. then I rub them with my rubs before going on the smoker.

O-Town
08-24-2011, 04:07 PM
I did the Myron Mixon marinade 2 weeks ago. I was less than impressed. The flavor was mostly odd (for lack of a better description) and the folks I fed them to were surprised that they did not get their usual tasty ribs.

Mister Bob
08-24-2011, 04:08 PM
I've tried marinating in Italian Dressing following Famous Dave's recipe a couple of times. Here's a link to the recipe. http://www.food.com/recipe/daves-rib-rub-and-pit-barbecue-ribs-99872

I didn't notice any appreciable benefit in flavor or texture so I haven't done it since.

chefdad
08-24-2011, 04:25 PM
A friend of mine at work marinates his ribs in lite beer overnight. He told me that it tenderizes the meat. The flavor comes from the rub and smoke. I have not tried this method. I have marinated and cooked brats in beer. Anyone else marinate their ribs or anything else in beer?

eddieh70301
08-24-2011, 05:07 PM
I agree w/chefdad. Marinating aids in tenderizing. i've had ribs that were marinated in dales marinade and it was way too salty. As chefdad said, the flavor comes from the rub.

GrillinFool
08-24-2011, 05:20 PM
I implore everyone in this thread to do a side by side. One marinated, one not. You can't imagine how much better my grilling has become when I use a control group for trying new stuff out...

Chopjaw
08-24-2011, 06:56 PM
I've tired both ways. To be honest it was a 50/50 split on who liked which ribs and why. To me it's easy, experiment, experiment, & experimant....

RedPig
09-15-2011, 05:17 AM
I've brined ribs and had excellent results, but I'm reluctant to use a brine for ribs in a contest. Sometimes I get overly creative when I need to keep things simpler. Most of us will agree that it's all about the flavor of the meat coming through and everything else in the mix- rub, smoke, sauce, glaze etc. should compliment, not overwhelm. Being somewhat of a rookie in competing (6 so far), I am concentrating on just getting my meats consistent every time. For now, I will keep practicing and experimenting between contests and eventually I'll have a standard regimen and routine just for contests. If you are not competing, then by all means amp it up some. If you are confident in your brine, then use it. I don't have one I'm confident enough to try yet, so I'll just keep tweaking until I get there.

twinsfan
09-15-2011, 06:01 AM
Best marinade is some concentrated (or regular) apple juice, or any fruit juice for that matter. Marinated one time for thirty six hours (schedule) and you got a hint of apple in them.

Curly Tails
09-15-2011, 06:22 AM
I also tried Myrons recipe and thought it was o.k. Dont think I will try it again.

Cook
09-15-2011, 06:33 AM
I've read a couple of posts that say marinading aid in tenderizing the meat.

You should not need anything to help aid in getting a tender rib. If you're not getting ribs nice & tender, I would suggest focusing on proper cooking techniques before experimenting too much.

Focus on the simple things first.

I like the taste of pork...therefore I don't try to cover it up with things like marinades. IF you're going for other styles of food (Asian ribs were mentioned earlier), then sure...follow their techniques.

Bill-Chicago
09-15-2011, 07:30 AM
Agree with Cook

And if you over fark with your ribs, on either the acidic or especially sodium level, you end up with ham-sicles.

Nothing worse than a "hammy" tasting rib, which I think thats what a few up thread mentioned by an "off taste"

I now only rub them 10 minute before going on.

I use to do years of experimenting and rubbing hours, overnight, or full days before.

Simple is now best for me as if you don't cook them properly to begin with, all the farking with them is purely a waste of time.

Good luck BruceB (although, since this was a month ago, you probably already tried some method. What did you think?)

captndan
09-15-2011, 07:49 AM
My thought is that the best ribs come from KC, Memphis, and me. Do they marinate? Cook has it right. But if you want a covered up taste have at it.

SteerCrazy
09-15-2011, 09:54 AM
I've marinated ribs with Kosmo's pork soak. I did find the ribs to be a bit more juicy but honestly not worth my effort at comps. I'd do it at home but one less thing I gotta bring to and do at a comp the better:becky:

nucornhusker
09-15-2011, 10:54 AM
I too will agree with Cook. My favorite ribs are just salt, and pepper with a little oil first. The pork and smoke flavor is amazing!

Lake Dogs
09-15-2011, 11:02 AM
I asked myself the same question. I also added brining to the equation and did a blind taste test. Here was the test. I took three half slabs of baby backs and slathered one in a rub, one I marinated in apple cider, garlic, and black pepper, and the third I did in apple cider, garlic, black pepper and salt (a basic brine). I put all three in separate ziplocks in the fridge overnight.

The next day I rinsed off the ribs in the marinade and brine and patted them dry and applied the exact same rub that was on the first slab of ribs. Then I cooked all three identically. I've done this experiment twice now. Once on my in-laws (who, God Bless them, are my guinea pigs a lot) and then on my dad. Each time the tasting was done blind. The tasters had no idea which rib was brined, marinated or rubbed. All they saw was three identical looking ribs.

The results were the same every time. The ribs with the rub were good, the marinated ribs were much better and the brined ribs were even better but not heads and shoulders better than the marinating. The simple results were a marinade improved the ribs a great deal over a rub, and even a rub that was applied the night before.

Prior to this I'd marinated a few times and brined a couple times and really couldn't tell if there was a difference from my ribs that I only did a rub on. But with no control group, it's very hard to compare apples to apples. Once I did them side by side, the results were startling. I brine every single time now. Doing them side by side is the only true way to judge the results.

But that's just me. Maybe you will do the experiment and come up with different results. I wasn't sure myself which is why I did the experiment a second time, but after the second experiment, I'm sold.

I've done the EXACT same thing now many times with almost exact same results, only we're 50/50 on the brine vs. marinade as to which is best, and I think it has more to do with who likes what amounts of sodium.

I HIGHLY suggest other folks try the head-to-head route like this and determine for themselves. Otherwise, honestly, you cant tell...

cpw
09-15-2011, 04:30 PM
I've done the EXACT same thing now many times with almost exact same results, only we're 50/50 on the brine vs. marinade as to which is best, and I think it has more to do with who likes what amounts of sodium.

I HIGHLY suggest other folks try the head-to-head route like this and determine for themselves. Otherwise, honestly, you cant tell...

Looks like I'm going to have to try brining ribs now.

QueNivorous
09-15-2011, 04:48 PM
We always marinate ribs. We score well with them having placed first, second, and third this year (in different competitions, of course). We think it's in part due to the marinade.

PimpSmoke
09-15-2011, 06:43 PM
I agree with mustard boy, less farking equals better. Every time I have been a party to marinating pork in italian dressing it has been a hot mess.

Lake Dogs
09-15-2011, 06:51 PM
I do think WHAT you marinade them in has a lot to do with it. I do basic; apple juice, water, worchestershire, sometimes some rub in there... Ice; overnight. It's a low-sodium brine. Me; I wouldn't dare marinade ribs in italian dressing, etc. Nope; no way. Nasty. Also, I'm told that the acids in a fruit juice, ala. apple juice, help break down fats. I dont know, but I pretty much render all the fat so that those bites are moist tender MEAT.

Vision
09-15-2011, 08:02 PM
I did the Myron Mixon marinade 2 weeks ago. I was less than impressed. The flavor was mostly odd (for lack of a better description) and the folks I fed them to were surprised that they did not get their usual tasty ribs.

x2

I like his process but the marinade is over the top; couldn't taste the meat. And I could see it not working. Two cups of salt AND soy sauce. Wow. I don't know I've ever seen a recipe calling for that much salt, and I love salt.

farklf
09-15-2011, 08:49 PM
spicy pickle juice for four hours then rub with brown sugar overnight. then rub for four hours then on smoker. that's my favorite.

NorthwestBBQ
09-15-2011, 08:51 PM
There is no need to marinate ribs.

Bbq Bubba
09-16-2011, 05:44 AM
I marinate the cook sometimes, but never the ribs. :thumb:

captndan
09-16-2011, 07:02 AM
I marinate the cook sometimes, but never the ribs. :thumb: Hope you don't marinade with salt or vinegar!

Skidder
09-16-2011, 07:14 AM
I usually don't marinate but have been known to soak ribs in pork base then dry rub. Pulled 1st and 2nd place trophies with them