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View Full Version : ? for the Tri-Tip experts


sullysQ
08-22-2011, 09:08 PM
The Publix here close by in Birmingham finally has some tri-tip. It looks well marbled but what should I look for when picking some out? After seeing all these Western guys on here brag about it, I want to see what all the fuss is about :razz:
Also is it best smoked or grilled?

Sam_Wheat
08-22-2011, 09:24 PM
Look for one with not too much fat and grill it!!! Enjoy

Carbon
08-22-2011, 09:31 PM
We seem to get them on sale quite often here but most of those are not well marbled at all.
Often times I'll spend $6.99/lb for some nice trimmed up tri tip.

martyleach
08-22-2011, 09:31 PM
Go for the well marbled piece. Trim the fat cap down to less than 1/4". Remove the silver skin and all surface fat from the other side. Give it a good rub with something like The Rub Company's Santa Maria Tri Tip rub or their Original. Grill indirect about 375-400 for about 45 minutes until IT is about 125. Then sear at high temp for several minutes a side. IT should be 130-135. Let rest under a foil tent for 15-20 minutes. Cut across the grain in thin slices (1/4").
Yum!

Durzil
08-22-2011, 10:53 PM
Go for the well marbled piece. Trim the fat cap down to less than 1/4". Remove the silver skin and all surface fat from the other side. Give it a good rub with something like The Rub Company's Santa Maria Tri Tip rub or their Original. Grill indirect about 375-400 for about 45 minutes until IT is about 125. Then sear at high temp for several minutes a side. IT should be 130-135. Let rest under a foil tent for 15-20 minutes. Cut across the grain in thin slices (1/4").
Yum!

I agree with Marty but I find that I like to do it low and slow myself @225. I sear at 135* IT, looking for a finished IT temp of 140* this has seemed to be the optimal temp to make it done enough for the wife yet still increadibly juicy. If you like it more rare pull it sooner. I find Tri-Tip can be cooked past rare but still retain the flavors and juiciness it raved for.

landarc
08-22-2011, 11:05 PM
I agree with going with a good marbled piece, I trim the fat cap as well. I always remove the silverskin too. I cook it low and slow lately, no reverse sear anymore as well. But, you can go traditional with great results as well, or low and slow with a reverse sear. The two keys are keep it below 135F after the rest and cut across the grain.

PatioDaddio
08-22-2011, 11:26 PM
I agree with Marty but I find that I like to do it low and slow myself @225. I sear at 135* IT, looking for a finished IT temp of 140* this has seemed to be the optimal temp to make it done enough for the wife yet still increadibly juicy. If you like it more rare pull it sooner. I find Tri-Tip can be cooked past rare but still retain the flavors and juiciness it raved for.

I agree, with the exception of the pre-sear temp. I'd recommend
a "Redneck Soo Veed" (reverse-sear) at 125*, giving you a final
temp (after resting) of about 140*.

Just my $0.02,
John

Chezmatt
08-22-2011, 11:28 PM
Go for the well marbled piece. Trim the fat cap down to less than 1/4". Remove the silver skin and all surface fat from the other side. Give it a good rub with something like The Rub Company's Santa Maria Tri Tip rub or their Original. Grill indirect about 375-400 for about 45 minutes until IT is about 125. Then sear at high temp for several minutes a side. IT should be 130-135. Let rest under a foil tent for 15-20 minutes. Cut across the grain in thin slices (1/4").
Yum!

What Marty said, except that I like to (a) marinate the tri-tip in red wine and crushed garlic for a couple/few hours before cooking and (b) grill indirect at 275-300 until it hits 125, the sear on high heat for only a couple minutes per side. The single most important thing is to cut thin and against the grain.

sullysQ
08-22-2011, 11:36 PM
Thanks guys. Is $7/lb a fair price? Also its listed as "sirloin tri-tip roast" if i recall, is that what I need to get?

NorCal Q Man
08-22-2011, 11:44 PM
^^^^Yup

syndicate559
08-22-2011, 11:46 PM
$7/lb. may be fair where you are due to availability. In California, you should still be able to find it under $5 "trimmed," but I find that different grocers have very different definitions of trimming.

PatioDaddio
08-23-2011, 12:07 AM
$7/lb. may be fair where you are due to availability. In California, you should still be able to find it under $5 "trimmed," but I find that different grocers have very different definitions of trimming.

Yeah, it usually runs about $4.95 - $5.95/lb out here just east of CA.

It's worth $7/lb, especially if it's hard to come by in your area.

John

NorCal Q Man
08-23-2011, 12:08 AM
I get local tri-tip for $6/lb, more for grass fed, or cheaper at Safeway, especially on sale.

Will work for bbq
08-23-2011, 12:16 AM
What Marty said, except that I like to (a) marinate the tri-tip in red wine and crushed garlic for a couple/few hours before cooking and (b) grill indirect at 275-300 until it hits 125, the sear on high heat for only a couple minutes per side. The single most important thing is to cut thin and against the grain.

X 2 on the wine marinate, I've been doing a Vinha D'Alhos (wine of garlic) marinate on TT for years, lately before going on the grill I'll hit it with either Rub Co Santa Maria or S.M. Season All both are great IMO.

Durzil
08-23-2011, 01:45 AM
I agree, with the exception of the pre-sear temp. I'd recommend
a "Redneck Soo Veed" (reverse-sear) at 125*, giving you a final
temp (after resting) of about 140*.

Just my $0.02,
John

This seems to be how most do it and the pics sure look wonderful on your site! I use your schmear (modified to taste) and then hit it with The Rub Co Santa Maria Style heavily before I put it on. Im hungry just thinking about it.

DirtyDirty00
08-23-2011, 07:39 AM
hmm. i gotta try some of this tri tip. 7/lb is quite an expensive cut of meat! how big are these pieces you guys buy? Does restaurant depot carry it? maybe itll be cheaper there