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View Full Version : Yet another question about PRIMO XL OVAL


S-L-A-C-K-E-R
08-17-2011, 02:34 PM
Ok, I know I know. You guys are tired of these questions. I tried searching though and couldn't really find an answer that made me feel confident. So here goes...

I'm heavily leaning towards the primo xl oval as my first serious grill / smoker purchase. What I need to know is how much attention is needed for smoking with this thing? Ideally, I wanted to get a stick burner and do the real serious bbq thing but the reality is that I just don't have the time to babysit it. I thought of getting a peller pooper, but the "set it and forget it" thing almost feels like cheating to me. I'm hoping the primo is a happy medium. I want to be able to feel like I'm doing some "real" bbq, but I also have a 2 year old son, a wife, and a house that all require my attention. I just don't want to feel like I'm tethered to the thing. I want to be able to smoke something and only have to check in on it every once and a while once it's up and going (once every half hour or so?). I just don't want to buy the thing and not have any time to use it for low and slow smoking. Can anyone give me some insight on the involvement needed with one of these things?

Al Czervik
08-17-2011, 08:07 PM
Ok, I know I know. You guys are tired of these questions. I tried searching though and couldn't really find an answer that made me feel confident. So here goes...

I'm heavily leaning towards the primo xl oval as my first serious grill / smoker purchase. What I need to know is how much attention is needed for smoking with this thing? Ideally, I wanted to get a stick burner and do the real serious bbq thing but the reality is that I just don't have the time to babysit it. I thought of getting a peller pooper, but the "set it and forget it" thing almost feels like cheating to me. I'm hoping the primo is a happy medium. I want to be able to feel like I'm doing some "real" bbq, but I also have a 2 year old son, a wife, and a house that all require my attention. I just don't want to feel like I'm tethered to the thing. I want to be able to smoke something and only have to check in on it every once and a while once it's up and going (once every half hour or so?). I just don't want to buy the thing and not have any time to use it for low and slow smoking. Can anyone give me some insight on the involvement needed with one of these things?

From what I've read, once you get dialed in on an Egg or Primo, they are pretty easy to use. I know many farkers on this site can chirp in with their experience. On the other hand, I have a pellet pooper and IMHO, unless you are hung up about what other people think, or looking to be a purist, they are a good alternative. The cost is comparable to the ceramics and if you buy the right one you can also sear up to 500 degrees. Set it and forget is is nice, especially if you have many things going on. Just my two cents worth... :becky:

Gore
08-17-2011, 09:19 PM
Once it settles in on a temp, and assuming you have plenty of coals, you really don't need to check it. You can go 20+ hours with the temperature needle rock steady. Believe me, it's very nice to light it up at 9:00pm, put your pork butts on an hour later, and get 12 hours (or more) of beauty sleep. People pay a premium to have these things insulated and rock steady. If you want to fiddle with it, sure, you can do that too, especially getting your initial temperature. As far as small children go, one other nice thing is that the ceramic is well insulated. Cooking low and slow, I can put my hand right on it -- My offset always made me nervous with kids (and company). I'd sometimes make barricades around it so people wouldn't get burnt. Also, I mainly got mine to cook in the winter. My uninsulated offset was useless come November. With the ceramic, you can go all year, no problem.

Bigfoot21075
08-18-2011, 03:34 AM
As others have said, once you set it you can pretty much forget it. With an absolute full load of Wicked Good lump at 225 - 235 degrees I can easily get more than 25 hours out of a full load even on a cold day/night.

Just a word of caution about the pellet. I have a Large BGE and wanted more rib capacity without stacking or moving stuff around, so as another option I bought a Traeger Texan. It did hold temps well and evenly (after you do the iron skillet and brick mods). but you could NOT get smoke taste. I even bought the Smoke Daddy Kahuna.

Also, comapred to the egg, Traeger made dry food. I sold mine on Craigslist after 15 tries. YMMV

S-L-A-C-K-E-R
08-18-2011, 08:10 AM
Awesome!!! Thanks for all the great info, everyone. I think I've decided to go the kamado style grill route. I'm still leaning towards the Primo, but I'm keeping an open mind and shopping around. I have lots of time. I don't get the green light from the wife until spring rolls around. Thanks for the great tips.

moyo25
09-16-2011, 05:11 PM
Appreciate the thread

QueNivorous
09-17-2011, 07:41 AM
I can't speak to the BGE but I can tell you there is virtually no tending required for a Primo XL Oval. We have run it cooking an entire brisket without refueling. Once you get the damper position set you just let it go.

jsperk
09-17-2011, 09:11 AM
Slacker if you want to see a Grill Dome let me know. My bbq supplier is in Monroville Pa and he sells all kind rubs and also sells lump.