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tortaboy
07-07-2011, 07:04 PM
Okay, really not secrets, but that word always draws attention. :mod:

There have been lots of questions regarding maintaining the integrity of the butt que when it is finished earlier than expected. Some people use Coolers stuffed with towels, others Cambro's....but I have not seen some of the more obvious solutions such as just wrapping the butt que in foil, putting on a cookie sheet, and just throwing it in the oven at a warming heat until mealtime.

For me, the oven is a great no fuss, no muss insulated holding chamber.

I realize off site cooks call for other solutions, but lots of times the question comes up about keeping the food warm when cooking at home.

dataz722
07-07-2011, 07:19 PM
I have done both towels and foil, both in coolers, and prefer the results with foil

Cook
07-07-2011, 07:43 PM
I have done both towels and foil, both in coolers, and prefer the results with foil

I don't think anyone I've ever seen has said to wrap a butt in just a towel. If they have, they are idiots (doesn't say much for anyone following that recommendation either).

You generally want to always wrap a butt in plastic and/or foil before doing anything. As far as holding in a cooler, Cambro (just an expensive cooler), or the oven...any of the above will work. All you're doing is keeping it hot/warm.

TWQQ
07-07-2011, 07:49 PM
I would recommend NOT wrapping anything warm in plastic wrap. There are a lot of chemicals in most plastic wraps that can leak into food when warmed. Even oil can act as a catalyst for leaking the chemicals.

landarc
07-07-2011, 07:53 PM
I have done all manner of holding processes and do not like the oven, the foil/towel/cooler works better for me. The oven just seems to cause over-cooking, the product often seems drier as well.

bigabyte
07-07-2011, 07:53 PM
:popcorn:

tortaboy
07-07-2011, 07:56 PM
I don't think anyone I've ever seen has said to wrap a butt in just a towel. If they have, they are idiots (doesn't say much for anyone following that recommendation either).

You generally want to always wrap a butt in plastic and/or foil before doing anything. As far as holding in a cooler, Cambro (just an expensive cooler), or the oven...any of the above will work. All you're doing is keeping it hot/warm.


Thank you for that intro.....which brings me to my next "Secret".

....Unless you are retired, it's tough to try doing many cooks during the work week. I've found that I can get home about 5pm, rub my butt, and throw it on the cooker. By 5:30pm, I'm smoking.

What I would normally do is just keep an overnight fire going and pull my meat in the morning. Last night, I did something different. At about 10pm, my butt had reached 150. It had wonderful bark and had sealed in all the smokey goodness it was going to absorb. At that point I thought to myself..."All I'm doing is keeping it hot" until done, from this point on. So....I wrapped it in foil, turned the oven to 300, and when I woke up this morning the house smelled incredible and the internal temp was 205! Perfect!

I removed the foiled butt from the oven and let it sit on the cookie sheet t for 30 minutes to reabsorb some of the juices.

Then, Pulled the bone, pulled the pork, chucked the fat, and in 15 minutes
it was in my big bowl ready for tonights meal. Had I thought about it, it could have also been todays lunch!

Question is...why worry about overnight smokes when you can do a worry free finish in the oven? Believe me, the taste and texture was identical to an overnight cook.

I think I'll call this, 4.5 hours of smoke, then auto pilot till done.

FIRE AWAY :tape:

expatpig
07-07-2011, 07:57 PM
I would recommend NOT wrapping anything warm in plastic wrap. There are a lot of chemicals in most plastic wraps that can leak into food when warmed. Even oil can act as a catalyst for leaking the chemicals.

You will probably die from the carcinogens from the smoked/charred/grilled meat way before the plastic wrap will harm you.

TWQQ
07-07-2011, 08:01 PM
You will probably die from the carcinogens from the smoked/charred/grilled meat way before the plastic wrap will harm you.

Aha, very true...

Limp Brisket
07-07-2011, 08:03 PM
I don't think anyone I've ever seen has said to wrap a butt in just a towel. If they have, they are idiots (doesn't say much for anyone following that recommendation either).

LOL :becky:

Contracted Cookers
07-07-2011, 08:08 PM
oven wish somebody would have thought of this sooner

tortaboy
07-07-2011, 08:10 PM
I have done all manner of holding processes and do not like the oven, the foil/towel/cooler works better for me. The oven just seems to cause over-cooking, the product often seems drier as well.

I hear you, but I can't understand how that is possible.

Since all you are doing is warming some meat in foil, how could an oven
cause any change in the meat inside that foil compared to a cooler?

Can anyone think of a possible explanation on this?

tortaboy
07-07-2011, 08:12 PM
oven wish somebody would have thought of this sooner

Haha:-P....easy to fire shots, but what is the benefit of finishing off on the que?

landarc
07-07-2011, 10:14 PM
I hear you, but I can't understand how that is possible.

Since all you are doing is warming some meat in foil, how could an oven
cause any change in the meat inside that foil compared to a cooler?

Can anyone think of a possible explanation on this?
I don't really understand it, but, I am basing this on a lot of experience testing it out and education, being taught how to roast meats.

When I was learning to cook, roasting meats is one of the things that was covered ad naseum, and the rule was always rest tented in foil, not wrapped, as air needed to circulate. I was taught that the proper way to cook meat was to learn what was needed to do and get the timing right to present meat correctly.

Then I learned how most restaurants do things, I learned of cambros, holding cabinets and such, note that none of these have active heat (some holding cabinets have exterior steam heating), you still had to keep things moving. And you still had to get the meat done within an hour to hour and a half window of service.

Then came BBQ, and it vagaries, and the technique of wrapping and coolering. And the fact that it is a lot harder to control time due to the stall and collagen rendering process.

Through all of this, I tried resting meat in a preheated oven, oven on lowest temperature and cold oven. In the first two cases, the meat dried up and over-cooked. The cold oven sucked the heat out of the meat. I think it is largely due to the dry air in an oven, as opposed to wrapping and coolering, which creates a moister environment. If you wrap and add moisture, then an oven might work, but, I see no reason that this is better than a cooler. Plus, it ties up an appliance I probably want to use in the mean time. I just cannot see how coolering is an inconvenience over using the oven.

tortaboy
07-07-2011, 10:27 PM
I have no idea what you are referring to regarding an oven sucking heat out of meat wrapped in foil??

Since you asked about the benefits of an oven.....
The oven can be used as an insulated chamber to hold meat at a certain temp (Much better, longer, and more stable than a cooler)...and no towels to fetch.

The oven can be used to finish a cook over a long period of time. Because the cooler is losing heat over time, it won't finish a butt that has 8 hours of cook time to go.

landarc
07-07-2011, 10:41 PM
I have no idea what you are referring to regarding an oven sucking heat out of meat wrapped in foil??
Try taking a hot piece of pork, say a 6 lb butt and shoving it in a cold oven and see how long it stays hot. Okay, 'sucking' is not the precise term, but, a cold oven really does not hold meat very well, it is not just about insulation is my point.

Since you asked about the benefits of an oven.....
The oven can be used as an insulated chamber to hold meat at a certain temp (Much better, longer, and more stable than a cooler)...and no towels to fetch.
I disagree, and that is not a big deal, I am no big time BBQ cook. I am just saying my results have lead me to believe in using a cooler and holding meat with no active heating. In terms of it being more stable, that may be the point, I do not want a stable heat held at a certain temperature for more than an hour or so. I want the temperature to slowly drop through the rest.

The oven can be used to finish a cook over a long period of time. Because the cooler is losing heat over time, it won't finish a butt that has 8 hours of cook time to go.
I never said to use the cooler to finish the cook, I use it to hold meat and to allow it to rest, it is very good for that. If I have a butt that needs 8 hours more to finish, then I add more charcoal and maybe wood, maybe not, and keep it going through the night. Me and the backyard racoons can become friends.

MA2C
07-07-2011, 10:47 PM
I have a warming drawer in the kitchen. Set it at the lowest setting (140-150) wrap butts in foil and put em in. Does not dry it out and keeps it toasty. Works for me.

bigabyte
07-07-2011, 11:41 PM
Just for the record, my experience is similar to landarcs. When I left it in the oven at 150, it became dry out and mushy. Personally, I think it needs to cool, but cool slowly. You're talking about maintaining a set temp vs cooling slowly. If you cool it slowly in the oven, then I imagine it would be no different.

NorCal Q Man
07-08-2011, 12:12 AM
Tortaboy, I believe the major difference in holding in a cooler versus an oven on a low setting is that the oven is still adding heat (energy) to the butt, so it is still cooking it. As to finishing in the oven, I've never tried it, so I can't speak much to it, but I suspect that it wouldn't make much difference to the finished product. However, it seems less fun and counter to the spirit of BBQ. If it works for you, though, and allows you to enjoy cooking more, then I say go for it.

Sammy_Shuford
07-08-2011, 12:20 AM
I use FTC; Foil, towel, cooler when carring some where. At Home, Foil, Towel, Microwave. Microwave works as good as a cooler.

tortaboy
07-08-2011, 12:24 AM
Tortaboy, I believe the major difference in holding in a cooler versus an oven on a low setting is that the oven is still adding heat (energy) to the butt, so it is still cooking it. As to finishing in the oven, I've never tried it, so I can't speak much to it, but I suspect that it wouldn't make much difference to the finished product. However, it seems less fun and counter to the spirit of BBQ. If it works for you, though, and allows you to enjoy cooking more, then I say go for it.

Regarding warming: I think that was pretty much covered by the guy that uses his built in warming drawer quite successfully. There are potentially HUGE variables in temps when we talk about warming something in the oven. We haven't even discussed what those temps should be, so how could you possibly knock it??? It's not like butt is some fragile meat that is easily messed up.

Me thinks we have some "Oven Phobia" going on here...LOL, but I expected that.

Regarding finishing off in the oven at 300 or so: It works, it's consistent, it allows me to que yet still have time to sleep...and the butt comes out perfectly. Vs. waking up every few hours to add fuel or stoke the fire? If you like more work for zero benefit, cooking all night long after the meat has already developed it's shell (and needlessly dealing with the smoker out back...have at it). No pride in working harder for the same result.

CarolinaQue
07-08-2011, 07:29 AM
Me thinks that some body has an awefully big chip on their shoulder!!!

I don't disagre with your technique per say, if it works for you, go for it.

As far as finishing in the oven, I have done many oven finish cooks for reasons of convenience at home myself when I need to run out to get something or something comes up. But it's not my prefered technique. For some, the benefit of convenience isn't necessarily a tangible thing, but more a thing of pride in tradition and respect for the craft in doing it the old way. Convenience isn't what life is always about for some of us that prefer to do que the more traditional way that we were taught by those that did it before us. Is it harder and more demanding, yes.

But for holding the meat after it's done, I also prefer to rest in a cooler or cambro. Out of the thousands of pounds of butts that I've cooked, and all of the techniques I have tried, I find that the cooler/cambro method works the best. It may be due to the fact that oven temps fluctuate any where from 25* to 50* of it's set temp, it doesn't stay constant, and this is why the product is different in the end. With a cooler or cambro, the temperature in the holding enviroment peaks and slowly, but evenly lowers.

Fatback Joe
07-08-2011, 07:51 AM
Unless you are an oven salesman, why do you even care?

Sounds like everyone has their own way, what's the problem?

Johnny_Crunch
07-08-2011, 07:59 AM
I don't finish my stuff in the oven for 2 reasons.

1. It makes my house stink like a smoker and it's not worth getting yelled at by Mrs. Crunch.

2. If I wanted to eat food out of and oven I wouldn't have bought a smoker.

NorCal Q Man
07-08-2011, 08:05 AM
Regarding warming: I think that was pretty much covered by the guy that uses his built in warming drawer quite successfully. There are potentially HUGE variables in temps when we talk about warming something in the oven. We haven't even discussed what those temps should be, so how could you possibly knock it??? It's not like butt is some fragile meat that is easily messed up.

Me thinks we have some "Oven Phobia" going on here...LOL, but I expected that.

Regarding finishing off in the oven at 300 or so: It works, it's consistent, it allows me to que yet still have time to sleep...and the butt comes out perfectly. Vs. waking up every few hours to add fuel or stoke the fire? If you like more work for zero benefit, cooking all night long after the meat has already developed it's shell (and needlessly dealing with the smoker out back...have at it). No pride in working harder for the same result.

Just for the record, there is no oven phobia from me. I've spent years cooking in the kitchen and still do if I HAVE to. My comment was not intended to insult your cooking choices. You had asked what the difference would be between holding in the oven and the cooler, and I was trying to explain why a person might get different results. I also wanted to explain why a person would choose to cook solely in their smoker, rather than finish in the oven. As to me, I don't care if you finish it in the crock pot and hold it in your pants, if you enjoy what your doing and the fruits of your labor. I'm from farking Northern California. We're quite tolerant here.

Keep on smoking!

tortaboy
07-08-2011, 08:06 AM
Unless you are an oven salesman, why do you even care?

Sounds like everyone has there own way, what's the problem.

No problem on my end...I was just sharing what worked for me, and was hoping I could save
others the mind numbing tasks of keeping overnight fires going on butt when it is not necessary.

Lots of ego going on here....but good que is not that difficult.

JD08
07-08-2011, 08:07 AM
Heat oven to lowest setting, then turn off. Wrap finished butt in foil and leave in oven until ready to pull. It will stay just as hot as the cooler for hours. Cools slowly and never dries out if wrapped in foil.

Johnny_Crunch
07-08-2011, 08:10 AM
Good que is not that tough.

Now this is funny.

jasonjax
07-08-2011, 08:11 AM
If it works for YOU... do it!

I've done almost every combination mentioned here. I have used the oven to finish pork butts multiple times. Usually not because I wanted to be "lazy?", but because I needed the smoking space for ribs/chicken etc. It works like a champ!

As for holding, my personal preference is the FTC method. I have successfully held shoulders for 8 hours that way and had them still be almost too hot to pull without gloves.

CarolinaQue
07-08-2011, 08:21 AM
It's not your sharing of information that makes you look like you have a chip on your shoulder, it's your delivery and confrontational attitude about it. We haven't knocked your method, we've just given our reasons for why we don't do it. Like said, if it works for you, have at it.

Johnny_Crunch
07-08-2011, 08:24 AM
I think the oven salesmen is just looking to argue. Don't go editing your posts dude. If you have something you believe leave it out there.

tortaboy
07-08-2011, 08:35 AM
I think the oven salesmen is just looking to argue. Don't go editing your posts dude. If you have something you believe leave it out there.

How about this Johnny...what the hell have you contributed to this thread?

Johnny_Crunch
07-08-2011, 08:37 AM
How about this Johnny...what the hell have you contributed to this thread?


I explained that my wife doesn't like my house to smell and that I bought a smoker so I didn't have to use my oven. What more could you possibly be looking for? That is a ton of incredibly useful information! :bow:

NorCal Q Man
07-08-2011, 08:40 AM
Regarding warming: No pride in working harder for the same result.

I think this may be where the disconnect is...a lot of people DO take pride in hard work. You can get good results in plenty of "set it and forget it" smokers too (and I'm not knocking people that use them), but for many people, the process matters as much as the final result.

Johnny_Crunch
07-08-2011, 08:48 AM
Me thinks we have some "Oven Phobia" going on here...LOL, but I expected that.

I missed this earlier but I think it is my favorite part! :flock:


The sheeple have spoken!

Cliff H.
07-08-2011, 08:48 AM
I never seem to get what I would call a good bark till the temp reaches 175-180. By that time the cook is more than half over.

tortaboy
07-08-2011, 08:52 AM
I think this may be where the disconnect is...a lot of people DO take pride in hard work. You can get good results in plenty of "set it and forget it" smokers too (and I'm not knocking people that use them), but for many people, the process matters as much as the final result.

Agreed.

The original problem I was trying to solve was..... How to get more cooks in during the week? And I resolved the problem using this method. Once the butt is crusted, it's hard to wreck.

The other topic we got into was, is there REALLY any benefit to using a cooler. Besides personal preference, I have not really seen anything that makes me believe there is. And just because someone has cooked a thousand butts the exact same way doesn't hold any weight with me.

I started the thread...it's not like I came in here and hijacked anyone elses. If anyone does not like the thread, go to another one where you can post important comments all day long such as, "I'd hit that", or "Yummy".

Johnny_Crunch
07-08-2011, 08:59 AM
tortaboy, you are officially my new favorite member. And I mean that sincerely. That is some funny azz stuff right there. "yummy" :laugh:

CarolinaQue
07-08-2011, 09:10 AM
You're on a discussion forum...that's what we're doing, discussing and giving opinions on the pro's and con's. I didn't realize we had to agree or shut up?

As far as not giving any credence or much of a thought to the experience of some one that has cooked thousands of punds of pork butt, well, that says all that needs to be said. And I don't mean just myself. There are many others that have responded to this thread with similar experience levels and the credentials to back them up.

thirdeye
07-08-2011, 09:39 AM
Okay, really not secrets, but that word always draws attention. :mod:

There have been lots of questions regarding maintaining the integrity of the butt que when it is finished earlier than expected. Some people use Coolers stuffed with towels, others Cambro's....but I have not seen some of the more obvious solutions such as just wrapping the butt que in foil, putting on a cookie sheet, and just throwing it in the oven at a warming heat until mealtime.

For me, the oven is a great no fuss, no muss insulated holding chamber.

I realize off site cooks call for other solutions, but lots of times the question comes up about keeping the food warm when cooking at home.

Boy, we've all had things finish earlier than expected, and like the rest of you, I have kind of a guesstimate of my finish time based on past cooks on a particular cooker. (All three cookers I use are different)

The logical solution is to monitor the internals so you could ramp the pit temp down (or up). But, when a butt finishes earlier than expected I've had the best luck wrapping in foil and into a cooler. For ease of clean-up of any leaked juices, I prefer wadded up newspaper for insulation.

Regarding some of the replies that mentioned a foil finish on butts, either in the pit or in the oven.... Sure, I've done that, but it's usually when something is not cooking fast enough. So, for a butt.... maybe 12 hours on the pit then foiled and into an oven will shorten my cook by a couple of hours. The meat is still smokey and the foil will hold some juices. Even though I'm a fan of long rests in a cooler, I still try to rest a foiled finished butt for an hour. A foil finish is not my preferred method for butts.

On a related subject, some of you older hands might recall Mike Scrutchfield's smoked and oven finished brisket method. It's been public for 12 or 15 years. It's my standard method for cooking flats, and I just did 3 whole briskets using this method last weekend. In a nutshell it calls for keeping the meat on the smoker until 165, foiling and finishing with a 300 temp in the pit or oven.

As far as plastic wrap goes, the commercial grade wrap does not have the odor problem that the wrap for home use does, and it does a great job of sealing itself and shrinking to the profile of the meat. I will use it on occasion but only with pit temps of 250 or less.

gtr
07-08-2011, 09:50 AM
Any tips on how I can fit my cooler in the oven?

OneHump
07-08-2011, 09:57 AM
Any tips on how I can fit my cooler in the oven?

Classic! :clap2:

CarolinaQue
07-08-2011, 10:00 AM
Any tips on how I can fit my cooler in the oven?


I think I need stiches I'm laughing so hard!!!

Johnny_Crunch
07-08-2011, 10:01 AM
I actually prefer the crock pot over all the ideas mentioned here............:-D

landarc
07-08-2011, 11:50 AM
Any tips on how I can fit my cooler in the oven?
Get a bigger oven, or a smaller cooler.

Pappy
07-08-2011, 12:27 PM
I've found that I can get home about 5pm, rub my butt, and throw it on the cooker. By 5:30pm, I'm smoking.

What I would normally do is just keep an overnight fire going and pull my meat in the morning. Last night, I did something different. At about 10pm, my butt had reached 150. It had wonderful bark and had sealed in all the smokey goodness it was going to absorb. At that point I thought to myself..."All I'm doing is keeping it hot" until done, from this point on. So....I wrapped it in foil, turned the oven to 300, and when I woke up this morning the house smelled incredible and the internal temp was 205! Perfect!

I removed the foiled butt from the oven and let it sit on the cookie sheet t for 30 minutes to reabsorb some of the juices.

Then, Pulled the bone, pulled the pork, chucked the fat, and in 15 minutes
it was in my big bowl ready for tonights meal.

I do this all the time with butts. I don't want the be up all night or ruin the meat on the smoker. :thumb:
Glad to see I'm not the only one doing this.

Cook
07-08-2011, 01:24 PM
Any tips on how I can fit my cooler in the oven?

I actually read on one of these forums one time where someone actually suggested brining a bird in a cooler, and instead of adding ice to the brine they suggested putting the cooler in the refrigerator.

Seriously? LOL

Cook
07-08-2011, 01:28 PM
...but good que is not that difficult.
Now this is funny.

I've made that statement before (bbq not being hard) and received much more criticism than this. LOL

You're right. BBQ isn't hard. It's people that make it hard. In the end it's just heat & meat.

landarc
07-08-2011, 01:32 PM
A lot of the brewers I know have fermentation coolers that are re-purposed chest freezers or upright freezers that would easily take a 5 gallon bucket. In fact, I wish I was one of those guys. I tend to brine in bags and oven pans, so they fit nicely in a refrigerator or ice chest full of ice.

KnucklHed BBQ
07-08-2011, 01:32 PM
Uhh... I had a few things I wanted to say but after reading the whole thread... I just drool & stare now.:doh:

Tortafella, I see your initial intent of being helpful to others that have been laboring over tending a pit all night, possibly unneccessarily, and it is helpful.
However, I think that your use of the word "finishing" might have blurred the true intent of the advice...

When you say finishing, I can see that you mean "Continue to cook through the stall until it's done and pullable" In this circumstance you are proposing to use the oven to continue the cooking after you've gotten the smoke flavor/color/bark desired, nothing wrong with that.

When others hear or say finishing, they are quite likely thinking more along the lines of resting.
Even the word resting brings many different conotations into the conversation, some rest for 30 min, some rest for 3-5 hours.

If you need to continue your cook because you've taken it out of the pit before it hits pulling temp, that's another matter.

Your original comment might have further mislead some here... "There have been lots of questions regarding maintaining the integrity of the butt que when it is finished earlier than expected."

This "earlier than expected" part would lead most to believe that the butt has hit temp, what do I do to hold it until I'm ready to serve?

And the most common response you'll get is to FTC, this will slow the cooking and start letting it cool slightly. Slowing the cooking will keep the pork from over cooking and getting mushy, the long slow rest will help render the remaining collegen without exposing the meat to more heat that might cause drying. Occationally if I pull a butt that is at a higher temp than I'd normally start resting at, I will open the foil and allow it to cool for 5-10 min before wrapping it back up and coolering.

I think you'd be amazed at how long a butt will stay too hot to handle if you FTC in this way:

Use a smaller cooler, this will confine the heat and keep the temp up longer.
Boil a small pan of water about 20 min or so before you plan to cooler, preheat the cooler with the water so that you're not tossing the butt into a cold cooler (same pricipal of slightly heating the oven).

Drain & dry the cooler and place the towels into it to preheat them, then add the foiled butt. That sucker will quite likely over cook if you leave it in there for too long unless the outside temp is fairly cool.





BTW, I'D TOTALLY HIT THAT! It looks SOOOOO YUMMY! :heh::heh:

thirdeye
07-08-2011, 01:34 PM
I actually read on one of these forums one time where someone actually suggested brining a bird in a cooler, and instead of adding ice to the brine they suggested putting the cooler in the refrigerator.

Seriously? LOL

One problem with that is the cooler will work against you, the insulation will restrict the cold from the fridge from reaching the contents of the cooler..... The coolest (parden the pun) bining bucket I have is a stainless steel ice bucket that I sto..., uh acquired from room service. The stainless really conducts the cold. It's too bad it's not larger, it might be 1-1/2 gallons.

KnucklHed BBQ
07-08-2011, 01:37 PM
A lot of the brewers I know have fermentation coolers that are re-purposed chest freezers or upright freezers that would easily take a 5 gallon bucket. In fact, I wish I was one of those guys. I tend to brine in bags and oven pans, so they fit nicely in a refrigerator or ice chest full of ice.

I usually just find the right size cooler for the amount of birds I'm doing and put the brine & birds straight in and fill with ice... washing the cooler when you're done kinda sucks, but I've done worse things...

N8man
07-08-2011, 01:51 PM
I'll finish my Cook in an Oven in a HeartBeat....
Usually this happens if the following conditions exists...
A...There's a Storm Coming....
B...I'm tired, and want to spend some quality time sleeping...
C...I'm hitting the Turkey Heavy....Happens all too often....
D...I want to spend a little quality time with the LadyFriend...Happens Less Frequently these days....
E...I'm feeling Fat and Lazy.....Also Happens too often.....

Anyways...The Oven is a Valid Tool in Our Cooking Arsenal, Use it to your Advantage.

Johnny_Crunch
07-08-2011, 01:54 PM
I've made that statement before (bbq not being hard) and received much more criticism than this. LOL

You're right. BBQ isn't hard. It's people that make it hard. In the end it's just heat & meat.


I agree, after years of learning, reading, practicing and trial and error this is not hard at all..............

landarc
07-08-2011, 02:20 PM
Cooking BBQ is not hard, you are just heating a hunk of meat, over a fire or other heat source, until it is tender and delicious.

Depending on what you seek, what your tastes are and how you choose to pursue the end product, it is all BBQ. I am rapidly coming to the conclusion that there is no single definition of BBQ, and that I am not the arbiter of what is right or wrong. Just what works for me.

For the record, I found my journey to making BBQ not all that easy, I had end goals that were not easily met. I learned from several old men, several techniques, from an old man from southern OK/northern Texas, a group of old men in Santa Maria area, an old man from Louisiana and some old men in Berkeley, Ca. I learned to control an open pit fire from a ranging 700F to 150F for glazing in a long open pit, to how to manage a offset smoker, how to feel and gauge heat by hand and face (who the heck puts their face over an open fire, oh, I do) and how to gauge when meat is done by grabbing the meat and feeling it. But, in general, it is actually pretty easy.

WineMaster
07-08-2011, 03:12 PM
I'll go as far to say that the mods that we do to our cookers only make them more like an oven. Very even heat and a stable temp environment. Add smoke, and it sounds like a oven to me.

KnucklHed BBQ
07-08-2011, 03:19 PM
I'll go as far to say that the mods that we do to our cookers only make them more like an oven. Very even heat and a stable temp environment. Add smoke, and it sounds like a oven to me.


Hmmm, when ever the wife has something "smoking" in the oven it's rarely edible. :heh:

gtr
07-08-2011, 03:24 PM
...(who the heck puts their face over an open fire, oh, I do)...

I think you could add Deguerre to that list.

Pappy
07-08-2011, 05:12 PM
I'm guessing that smoking a butt the whole time in the smoker would taste better than finishing it in the oven wrapped in foil. The foil traps a lot of fluid. I don't know if I like it that way. Seems too juicy. Some day I will do the marathon offset smoker butt cook and find out.

Everyone that ate my worst BBQ even said it was good.

tortaboy
07-08-2011, 07:01 PM
Uhh... I had a few things I wanted to say but after reading the whole thread... I just drool & stare now.:doh:

Tortafella, I see your initial intent of being helpful to others that have been laboring over tending a pit all night, possibly unneccessarily, and it is helpful.
However, I think that your use of the word "finishing" might have blurred the true intent of the advice...

When you say finishing, I can see that you mean "Continue to cook through the stall until it's done and pullable" In this circumstance you are proposing to use the oven to continue the cooking after you've gotten the smoke flavor/color/bark desired, nothing wrong with that.

When others hear or say finishing, they are quite likely thinking more along the lines of resting.
Even the word resting brings many different conotations into the conversation, some rest for 30 min, some rest for 3-5 hours.

If you need to continue your cook because you've taken it out of the pit before it hits pulling temp, that's another matter.

Your original comment might have further mislead some here... "There have been lots of questions regarding maintaining the integrity of the butt que when it is finished earlier than expected."

This "earlier than expected" part would lead most to believe that the butt has hit temp, what do I do to hold it until I'm ready to serve?

And the most common response you'll get is to FTC, this will slow the cooking and start letting it cool slightly. Slowing the cooking will keep the pork from over cooking and getting mushy, the long slow rest will help render the remaining collegen without exposing the meat to more heat that might cause drying. Occationally if I pull a butt that is at a higher temp than I'd normally start resting at, I will open the foil and allow it to cool for 5-10 min before wrapping it back up and coolering.

I think you'd be amazed at how long a butt will stay too hot to handle if you FTC in this way:

Use a smaller cooler, this will confine the heat and keep the temp up longer.
Boil a small pan of water about 20 min or so before you plan to cooler, preheat the cooler with the water so that you're not tossing the butt into a cold cooler (same pricipal of slightly heating the oven).

Drain & dry the cooler and place the towels into it to preheat them, then add the foiled butt. That sucker will quite likely over cook if you leave it in there for too long unless the outside temp is fairly cool.



BTW, I'D TOTALLY HIT THAT! It looks SOOOOO YUMMY! :heh::heh:


You are absolutely correct. I ended up with two completely separate topics (Both that just happened to be about the oven) in one thread.

Cook
07-08-2011, 11:53 PM
One problem with that is the cooler will work against you, the insulation will restrict the cold from the fridge from reaching the contents of the cooler..

Yes...and that is my point. I couldn't believe such an intelligent guy (and he is) would suggest such a thing. Putting a closed cooler in the fridge to keep it cool instead of putting ice in it? LOL I wanted to die!

Cook
07-08-2011, 11:54 PM
I agree, after years of learning, reading, practicing and trial and error this is not hard at all..............

Sorry it took you so long. Glad you could finally join the party.

Big A
07-09-2011, 12:22 AM
I like my weber ots.:thumb: