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View Full Version : Wood Question - Chainsaw Cut OK?


Daddy-O
07-05-2011, 07:02 AM
Hey I have a dumb question -

Someone gave me some cherry wood that he had cut up with a chain saw. Do I need to worry about the bar oil that may or may not be on the wood?

Dont wan't oily-tasting grub. But I also don't want to waste this opportunity if the wood would be OK....

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
07-05-2011, 07:10 AM
I bet that the vast majority of wood for smoking is cut with a chain saw. Mine is and the thought never occurred to me. You are good to go IMO.

CarolinaQue
07-05-2011, 07:14 AM
I know some people that cut the ends of the sticks with a chop saw after they're cut with a chain saw. I never worry about it myself. Many a people have eaten many a pounds of BBQ with wood cut with a chain saw that are perfectly healthy. I think that the amount of bar oil is minimal and never penetrates the wood.

Saiko
07-05-2011, 07:33 AM
That question is debated quite often. I just cut up some red oak this weekend and used canola oil instead. Didn't notice too much difference in the cutting action.

I've never worried about it before, and never noticed any bar oil on my wood. I'll probably keep using canola oil for now.

orangeblood
07-05-2011, 07:40 AM
i bet 99% of fire and smoking wood is cut w/ chainsaws; i have never seen a concerning amount of bar oil on a chainsaw cut stick...did the batch cherry you got have a lot of oil on it?

rocketmanray
07-05-2011, 08:00 AM
The oil lubricates the chain and bar, the chain cuts the wood, the wood slivers carry away most of the oil....

OK, and I never thought of it was a problem. Although I have to admit, I did think about it once.

RMR

jestridge
07-05-2011, 09:39 AM
only if you cook it on galvannize metal (kidding) there will be Np

bigabyte
07-05-2011, 09:42 AM
How the hell do people think the wood they have ALWAYS ordered got chopped up to begin with? Magic farkin' fairies?:loco:

deguerre
07-05-2011, 09:49 AM
How the hell do people think the wood they have ALWAYS ordered got chopped up to begin with? Magic farkin' fairies?:loco:
If wood is involved it'd be nymphs.

Daddy-O
07-05-2011, 10:37 AM
i bet 99% of fire and smoking wood is cut w/ chainsaws; i have never seen a concerning amount of bar oil on a chainsaw cut stick...did the batch cherry you got have a lot of oil on it?

No, not at all. At least none that I noticed. I was just wondering. I have been smoking food much more lately & it just crossed my mind. I knew that people here would have an opinion, for sure.

THANKS

1FUNVET
07-05-2011, 10:42 AM
How the hell do people think the wood they have ALWAYS ordered got chopped up to begin with? Magic farkin' fairies?:loco:


Beavers :becky:

Daddy-O
07-05-2011, 10:43 AM
How the hell do people think the wood they have ALWAYS ordered got chopped up to begin with? Magic farkin' fairies?:loco:

Never ordered or paid for smoking wood, so I have no idea....

however, there are lots of saws that cut without using oil to lubricate the cut. Thats all I was asking.

bigabyte
07-05-2011, 10:47 AM
Just so's ya know, I said that tongue in cheek...:becky:

cliffcarter
07-05-2011, 11:37 AM
That question is debated quite often. I just cut up some red oak this weekend and used canola oil instead. Didn't notice too much difference in the cutting action.

I've never worried about it before, and never noticed any bar oil on my wood. I'll probably keep using canola oil for now.

I wouldn't cut too much wood with canola oil for a chain lube, you should be using what ever the manufacturer recommends. You do not need to lay on the oil every time you make a cut either.
If you see oil on the wood wipe it off:idea:

WesternTrails
09-18-2011, 05:04 PM
A word of caution about using a chop saw to chunk wood. I was doing this last year, and the blade jammed in a twisted piece of live oak about 3" thick. The whole saw began to buck and the blade pounded the wood into the guard, smashing my finger. At the ER they called my injury a degloving, and boy is that an apt term. The soft tissue grew back but I learned a painful lesson. Some saws are made cut lumber, and some are made to cut tree limbs. A chop saw is the former. I've been using a small electric chain saw ever since. I think the bar oil is so minimal as not to matter.

Guamaque
09-18-2011, 05:13 PM
I always use a chainsaw to cut all of my wood. I never noticed the oil taste. The sweet taste of the diesel fuel I use to light my fires may overwhelm the fine oil aroma in the wood. :wacko: Maybe I should switch to gasoline. :thumb:

caseydog
09-18-2011, 05:54 PM
I cut firewood in college to pay the bills. If the chainsaw is well maintained, there isn't going to be much oil on the wood. It does not take a lot of oil for the saw to work, and having a saw that goes through a lot of oil doesn't save money. Plus, the chit flies all over the guy using the saw, which sucks.

That said, if I were cutting my own wood for cooking use, I would probably use a vegetable based oil.

Bottom line, I wouldn't worry about it, unless you can see significant oil stains on the wood. Then, just cut it off, or toss that chunk in the fireplace.

CD

El Ropo
09-18-2011, 06:00 PM
All the chop saws I've ever used will automatically shut down if the blade stops.........

I've used a chop saw to cut down seasoned pecan, and it did jam once or twice, but it also shut down, so no personal damage to my limbs.

sbsg2005
09-18-2011, 06:11 PM
I wouldn't use canola oil in my saw that stuff leaves a stick film on everything if not cleaned of promptly. Nothing like have to tear apart the saw to clean the bar and chain so they will move freely since the canola oil gummed them up the last time it was used.

Disciple882542
09-18-2011, 08:27 PM
I've been using a $20 reciprocating saw from harbor freight with a 9" pruning blade to cut my stuff up. I cut up some large oak limbs (8-10") just today with it. Takes a little more time but the chain saw is not working right now.

cliffcarter
09-18-2011, 08:32 PM
I wouldn't use canola oil in my saw that stuff leaves a stick film on everything if not cleaned of promptly. Nothing like have to tear apart the saw to clean the bar and chain so they will move freely since the canola oil gummed them up the last time it was used.

Bar and chain oil for the saw, canola oil for cooking.:doh:

This kind of thread shows up way too often, maybe there should be a sticky answering this question.:idea:

Cook
09-18-2011, 08:41 PM
You can use this oil or that oil.

You can use this saw or that saw.

You can do this or that.

Or you can just cut the darn wood and stop worrying over every little thing in life.

If your saw takes alot of oil to run properly, get it fixed or get a new saw.

If your wood has a bunch of oil on it, don't use it.

Zin
09-18-2011, 10:42 PM
If you can see oil on the wood after the cut something is wrong with your chain saw.

sawzall
09-18-2011, 10:48 PM
Well I bought a 14" electric chainsaw just for my smoking hobby and I've only ever used vegetable oil in the bar oil reservoir. It's never gummed up or caused any problems. As a bonus it is also cheaper than bar oil. My chain has not worn abnormally fast or anything like that. It smells better than bar oil too. If I was just cutting up the wood for chunks I may not have worried about the small amount of oil on the cut ends but I save the sawdust to use for smoking as well so I decided to use the veggie oil. It's also better for the environment. I think if you're not going to save the sawdust/chips use what ever you want but if you want to save them and smoke with them then use non toxic oil like vegetable or canola oil.

gtr
09-18-2011, 10:53 PM
Never thought about the chainsaw thing, but I do know that the best thing for wood is beavers.

Guamaque
09-19-2011, 03:51 AM
Never thought about the chainsaw thing, but I do know that the best thing for wood is beavers.

Termites !

Theboz1419
09-19-2011, 05:42 AM
Never thought about the chainsaw thing, but I do know that the best thing for wood is beavers.


That gave me a good laugh :becky:

smokeyw
09-19-2011, 06:19 AM
I have to agree that any oil on the wood is so minimum that no one will know it is there. I can't see or smell any oil on my wood and have never noticed any oil flavor from my smoked meats.

cliffcarter
09-19-2011, 06:36 PM
Never thought about the chainsaw thing, but I do know that the best thing for wood is beavers.

http://i796.photobucket.com/albums/yy250/cliffcarter/fridaywalk34.jpg

gtr
09-19-2011, 06:37 PM
^^^:shocked:^^^

caseydog
09-19-2011, 06:50 PM
I wouldn't use canola oil in my saw that stuff leaves a stick film on everything if not cleaned of promptly. Nothing like have to tear apart the saw to clean the bar and chain so they will move freely since the canola oil gummed them up the last time it was used.

I wouldn't use canola oil from the grocery store, but there are vegetable based lubricants out there. I know the go-cart racing guys have been using plant based oils in their Rotax 2-cycle carts for years. Vegetable lubricants have been around since WWII.

Vegetable oils have great natural lubricity, but need additives to be used as lubricants, unless you use your equipment everyday. If you let your saw sit for months between uses, you will have issues as the vegetable oils oxidize and -- as mentioned -- gum up.

CD

Matt_A
09-19-2011, 07:15 PM
http://www.bathmaine.com/uploads/rich_text_editor/orlop/orlop33/33bucksaw.jpg

No oil, no gas.... just pain and fantastic exercise

wnkt
09-20-2011, 04:17 PM
Never thought about the chainsaw thing, but I do know that the best thing for wood is beavers.

What about the known carcinogenic properties of beaver spit...I dont want none of that in MY Q

schoonch
09-20-2011, 06:39 PM
That cherry wood is definitely contaminated by petroleum products which will give off toxic fumes when burned and can cause serious health problems. Fortunately for you, I have experience in the proper disposal of such hazardous material. Send that cherry wood off to me and I personally guarantee to incinerate it in the appropriate vessel.

I agree with the above comments. Don't stress about it. Cut it whith whatever works and it will be fine.

TnDrew
09-20-2011, 06:59 PM
Add some balsamic vinegar and some lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes, and call it a salad!

DirtyDirty00
09-20-2011, 08:13 PM
Add some balsamic vinegar and some lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes, and call it a salad!


ya a chop (saw) salad!

brewerjamie15
09-20-2011, 11:06 PM
Interesting (since I never saw this q before) I never thought about it. Can't see it being a problem at all unless you live in California. Then, it'd be illegal for whatever reason.

Joking aside, if you aren't comfy then get a bow saw and cut a little off the ends of your sticks. Clean, no oil used at all just elbow grease.

deerslayer8153
09-21-2011, 04:03 PM
I'd caution you to not use a chop saw too. I was carefully cutting a lump of dried hickory when mine jammed and broke the aluminum guard off the saw. Luckily my fingers weren't in the way!!

jestridge
09-21-2011, 06:31 PM
be careful cutting round thing with chop saw.

atvalaska
09-21-2011, 07:31 PM
skip the chop saw and as it will tend "to jump" = ouch ...pour wesson oil in the chain saw and run away with it ...i cut up/ part -out whole moose in the field every year with a chain saw......just say'in

atvalaska
09-21-2011, 07:33 PM
Interesting (since I never saw this q before) I never thought about it. Can't see it being a problem at all unless you live in California. Then, it'd be illegal for whatever reason.
AND IF U DO LIVE IN CA...i'd add extra oil to the gas ...fire the saw up , set it in the yard and head into the house for dinner and a movie....:-P

spider22
09-22-2011, 01:06 PM
I cut firewood in college to pay the bills. If the chainsaw is well maintained, there isn't going to be much oil on the wood. It does not take a lot of oil for the saw to work, and having a saw that goes through a lot of oil doesn't save money. Plus, the chit flies all over the guy using the saw, which sucks.

That said, if I were cutting my own wood for cooking use, I would probably use a vegetable based oil.

Bottom line, I wouldn't worry about it, unless you can see significant oil stains on the wood. Then, just cut it off, or toss that chunk in the fireplace.

CD
I agree with this. I have cut a lot of wood over the last 25 years and there is not enough oil on the wood to say so because most of it stays between the bar and chain. I don't believe what little if any oil that gets on the wood will bother anything in the cooking.

bbqhead
09-22-2011, 06:26 PM
A "chop saw" is for metal, If you are talking a "mitre saw" then you have a very dull blade or a cheap saw. I cut my wood with mine all the time and never had a problem.

randy

SouthernMagicBBQ
09-23-2011, 05:23 AM
I've never noticed any problems. Most wood suppliers use old motor oil in their saws. You could not afford wood that was hand cut. 'especially if I had to cut it'