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Redheart
06-04-2011, 09:35 AM
Alright, I am a proud and egotistical somanovitch, especially when it comes to my Q. But I am in need of some advice.

I will be doing a 75 or so pound full steamship round for a wedding. It has been requested low and slow. In the past I have done it around 350 F. More like roasting than Q.

Anyone out there have some experience with low and slow steamship round? This will be a full joint of meat, bone in. I will be using a rotisserie in a big ole pig cooker.

My main concern is the timing. I don't want to hold up anything at this reception.

I have placed this here in Q-talk, so that I can get input from everyone, not just those who frequenting the catering threads.

Please chime in!

Thirsty4Q
06-04-2011, 01:10 PM
I had planned on doing the same thing for a party tomorrow. My butcher convinced me to do 3 whole top round roasts instead. 20-22#ers apiece. Slightly more expensive, but all of the tasty cut and none of the bottom round, not so tasty. Plus much more easy to carve then a whole leg.

So that was the plan, but once that changed my buddy's wife who is paying for it decided to go with whole ribeyes instead, so that is my smoke for tomorrow.

Sorry no experience with the whole steamship, just thought I would offer my butchers advice.

ibait2fish
06-04-2011, 01:20 PM
I'm not familiar with 'steamship round', it would seem that, as with sirloin tip, top round, etc., that it won't really benefit from 'low and slow'. If that's the way that they want it, then
why not? Can't hurt anything. I think that I'd try ~250 deg. Maybe try hotter for the
first 1/2-1 hr, and then lower it to 250? That sucker's gonna take a while to cook!

jestridge
06-04-2011, 02:20 PM
what temp will you pull it at?

Dr_KY
06-04-2011, 02:34 PM
I too would aim for 325 then down to 250 at the lowest. Consider placing the thicker part closer to the heat source and you will be able to serve rare to well done just by moving down the beef.

Frank Grimes
06-04-2011, 07:33 PM
I work for a food distributor, here are the instructions that come with the pork steamship we sell. Are you doing beef or pork?

PORK STMSHP LEG B\I FRSH
BONE-IN MAKES FOR AN EXCEPTIONALLY TENDER AND
JUICY CUT OF MEAT, WITH A DEEP, RICH NATURAL
FLAVOR RIGHT OFF OF THE BONE. NO ADDED
PRESERVATIVES, FILLERS OR FLAVORING SOLUTIONS OF
ANY KIND. DELIVERS A VERY UNIQUE PRESENTATION THAT
WARRANTS EYE APPEAL FOR ANY OCCASION. PERFECT
THROUGH THE HOLIDAYS OR YEAR AROUND. IDEAL FOR
CARVING STATIONS AND BUFFETS. SHELF LIFE IS 21
DAYS FROM DATE OF PACK. THE CARVING INSTRUCTIONS
FOR THIS IS TO CARVE BY GRASPING THE HANDLE
(SHANK BONE) & SLICING IN HORIZONTALLY FROM THE
OUTSIDE EDGE SLICING UNTIL TOUCHING BONE, YOU CAN
THEN SLICE DOWN ALONG BONE & REMOVE WHOLE SLICE &
SERVE. RECOMMENDED COOKING ---LET PRODUCT SIT OUT
@ ROOM TEMP APPROX 45MIN TO GET THE CHILL OUT.RUB
WITH OLIVE OIL AND APPLY YOUR FAVORITE SEASONING
PLACE IN A 400 DEGREE OVEN UNTIL DESIRED COLOR IS
REACHED APPROX 30MIN. ADJUST TO 275DEGREE AND COOK
TO 135DEGREE APPROX 2.5HOURS REMOVE FROM OVEN AND
LET STAND FOR 20MIN BEFOR CARVING.DONT OVERCOOK!!

Frank Grimes
06-04-2011, 07:49 PM
The instructions above are for a 17-20 lber, you said yours was 75lbs? It must be beef. I deal with a chef that does them at Holiday brunches. He said he cooks them at 300 for 4-5 hours, or until they reach 140 degrees. He said his are usually around 50 lbs, so allow a little more time as yours is 75. Hope this helps.

Cliff H.
06-04-2011, 08:07 PM
I don't have any advise but I am curious. What should the end result be?

Pulled beef, more like BBQ ?

Sliced beef, more like a steak cut ?

landarc
06-04-2011, 09:40 PM
The steamship rounds that I have had were all done to medium rare and sliced as roasts. Done low and slow, with that big bon in it, you could be looking at 30 mins. per pound to get to medium rare. I would recommend you find a way to smoke it for a couple of hours, the raise the heat and roast it.

I sure hope they are not expecting it to anything like BBQ brisket or chuck.

Redheart
06-04-2011, 11:45 PM
I had planned on doing the same thing for a party tomorrow. My butcher convinced me to do 3 whole top round roasts instead. 20-22#ers apiece. Slightly more expensive, but all of the tasty cut and none of the bottom round, not so tasty. Plus much more easy to carve then a whole leg.

So that was the plan, but once that changed my buddy's wife who is paying for it decided to go with whole ribeyes instead, so that is my smoke for tomorrow.

Sorry no experience with the whole steamship, just thought I would offer my butchers advice.

The beauty of the steamship is that in one cook I can provide medium rare thru well done on one piece of meat. Most butchers I have talked with have also given me the same line as yours but when push came to shove they couldn't get me the steamship cut anyway because they were buying there meat from large packers and placing an order was impossible.

I have an old cruise line buffet manager to carve the meat so I am not worried about that aspect.
Best of luck with the ribeyes!

Redheart
06-04-2011, 11:54 PM
I'm not familiar with 'steamship round',

Steamship round is the whole round with rump and heel.

it would seem that, as with sirloin tip, top round, etc., that it won't really benefit from 'low and slow'. If that's the way that they want it, then
why not? Can't hurt anything. I think that I'd try ~250 deg. Maybe try hotter for the
first 1/2-1 hr, and then lower it to 250? That sucker's gonna take a while to cook!

I was planning on 250* for an hour and then dropping temp to around 190* for 12 hours to an internal temp of 140* at the thickest part of the rump.

I know there is not as much collagen as a brisket or a chuck, just looking to provide a smokey and flavourful piece of meat with a similar texture and taste to a rib roast.

Redheart
06-04-2011, 11:57 PM
what temp will you pull it at?

It will be cooked to 140* at the thickest part of the rump.

Redheart
06-04-2011, 11:58 PM
I too would aim for 325 then down to 250 at the lowest. Consider placing the thicker part closer to the heat source and you will be able to serve rare to well done just by moving down the beef.

Thanks for the input. How about a time table to go with this?

Redheart
06-05-2011, 12:00 AM
I work for a food distributor, here are the instructions that come with the pork steamship we sell. Are you doing beef or pork?


Never heard of a pork steamship. I would just call it a fresh ham.

Redheart
06-05-2011, 12:02 AM
I don't have any advise but I am curious. What should the end result be?

Pulled beef, more like BBQ ?

Sliced beef, more like a steak cut ?


Cliff, this is definitely a roast, so the best description I could give it is like a smoked bone in rib roast.

Redheart
06-05-2011, 12:41 AM
The steamship rounds that I have had were all done to medium rare and sliced as roasts. Done low and slow, with that big bon in it, you could be looking at 30 mins. per pound to get to medium rare. I would recommend you find a way to smoke it for a couple of hours, the raise the heat and roast it.

I was figuring 12 hours low and slow. Would really hate to be that far off in my calcs, because that means a 24 hour cook! At 300* this would only take about 6 hours. Maybe its time for me to go Myron Mixon on this thing and do it fast!

I sure hope they are not expecting it to anything like BBQ brisket or chuck.

No, they know it will not be fork tender. She originally wanted smoked prime rib, but when she saw the price for the meat she shot it down. That's when he suggested steamship round.

I will be injecting and using my 'green' rub (Mediterranean spices plus a few more little things) so I am confident in the taste profile, (its the same as I use for smoked rib roasts), my biggest worry is timing this puppy out so it is ready when the dinner reception starts.

landarc
06-05-2011, 01:11 AM
The steamship roast was popular for cruise ships and hotels because it is showy on the carving station, while being carved (they used to grab the bone and carve it) and it can be cooked at higher temperatures very successfully. I was first taught to cook it at 450F to a internal of 140F. Rare at the bone, well-done on the outside.

I don't think you will get much more smoke into a 75lb roast on the bone than a couple of hours will give you. After that, put the spurs to it.

Pitmaster T
06-05-2011, 10:34 AM
Do not do these at any temp below 350 unless its real low for a bit like 220 or something. Enough to get the smoke ring set.

Deep Internals of 135-140. Most of your cooking should be at 400 or so. If you like an internal higher then cook brisket. This is a great and impressive cut that is best and most tender Rare to Medium.

And you can take that from a guy who designed a whole pit and FORGOT to modify the rotisserie to fit one of these. I had to cut my shelves out and redo them with static shelving on one side for the cut to fit.

I have done maybe 50 of these (60-75) pounders. They were my thing for the more elegant caterings. Best was when I paired up with a wedding planner and all I had to do was cook these for her.

What is the best apparatus I ever saw cook one of these? In Old Saybrook Connecticut I saw a guy that cooked his on a modified ocean buoy bottom (which was a half sphere) and a rotisserie.

Redheart
06-05-2011, 05:53 PM
^^^^ if I go with your method can you give me a time table so I can plan it out? As I have stated previously my nervousness is about the time table. They would like to serve at 6:30 pm. I also found out that the actual weight of the haunch is just over 60lbs.

ibait2fish
06-06-2011, 06:00 PM
Well, my suggestion was based on the fact that you can't take a cut that size outta the fridge,
put it on the counter and let it get to room temp..i.e. the meat is cold and will continue to
be for sometime after you put it on the cooker..so, I reasoned, a higher initial temperature will at least get everything going, heating the ends of the bone, etc.

That said, I think your times are short...for me, a 8 lb. bone off prime rib takes from 10-20
min./lb( avg 15), at 195-200, depending on the weather...that's letting it get to room temp
before cooking...and I Take it out between 125- 130 internal...

Let us know how it turns out!

landarc
06-06-2011, 06:18 PM
Well, Donnie has lost his way...here is what mine would be

2 hours at room temperature
2 hours at 225F with smoke
10 hours at 400F
1 hour rest foil tented or under lamps

65 pounds was it? then 65lbs x 10 min/lb at 400F to 425F=975 mins=10 hours

note that thin side of roast will be medium, thick side will be rare-medium-rare, those that well done, can be carved from any edge.

The_Kapn
06-06-2011, 06:56 PM
Nothing to add, except---WOW! :-D

That is a huge and impressive hunk of meat to cook.

Please give us some vicarious pleasure with a report as it cooks--OK?

Jealous Mod here.

TIM

Redheart
06-06-2011, 08:16 PM
Well, Donnie has lost his way...here is what mine would be

2 hours at room temperature
2 hours at 225F with smoke
10 hours at 400F
1 hour rest foil tented or under lamps

65 pounds was it? then 65lbs x 10 min/lb at 400F to 425F=975 mins=10 hours

note that thin side of roast will be medium, thick side will be rare-medium-rare, those that well done, can be carved from any edge.

Thanks again. Although I am not following your math. 65lbs x 10 min/lb = 650 min; 650/60 = 10.833 hours at 400*
Plus the 2 hours on smoker etc.

Did I get it right?

I will take photos and let everyone know how it goes.

Pitmaster T
06-08-2011, 03:03 PM
Please clarify how I have lost my way? It seems to me our recipe is identical except for resting outta the fridge, which considering what it is you literally want to do first (set the ring) is not needed in my opinion unless you have it out while your getting your fire ready.

Well, Donnie has lost his way...here is what mine would be

2 hours at room temperature
2 hours at 225F with smoke
10 hours at 400F
1 hour rest foil tented or under lamps

65 pounds was it? then 65lbs x 10 min/lb at 400F to 425F=975 mins=10 hours

note that thin side of roast will be medium, thick side will be rare-medium-rare, those that well done, can be carved from any edge.

landarc
06-08-2011, 03:05 PM
You weren't responding back Donnie. I was not talking about your advice, it was spot on.

landarc
06-08-2011, 03:07 PM
Thanks again. Although I am not following your math. 65lbs x 10 min/lb = 650 min; 650/60 = 10.833 hours at 400*
Plus the 2 hours on smoker etc.

Did I get it right?

I will take photos and let everyone know how it goes.
So we all know that I am no math whiz and suffer for lack of attention to detail :doh:. Your numbers are correct.

Pitmaster T
06-08-2011, 03:50 PM
Oh I c. Yeah i don't always have time these days to respond PLUS i have always refused to contribute a time scale, mostly because some guy other than the person you intended it to be for while see your time scale as divine and then because the meat or something else is different will cook it precisely as you say and he has over or under cooked it. That's why I use IT.

But I guess he does need a basic time scale and 12 hours is about right. These things are okay to sit so I alway give myself a couple more in case there is a problem.

You weren't responding back Donnie. I was not talking about your advice, it was spot on.

landarc
06-08-2011, 03:57 PM
I know you got a lot going on. The time scale thing makes sense, never thought about that.

Redheart
06-09-2011, 12:13 AM
So we all know that I am no math whiz and suffer for lack of attention to detail :doh:. Your numbers are correct.



Your tag line says it all ...

"perhaps...but then again...maybe not..."

Redheart
06-09-2011, 12:17 AM
Oh I c. Yeah i don't always have time these days to respond PLUS i have always refused to contribute a time scale, mostly because some guy other than the person you intended it to be for while see your time scale as divine and then because the meat or something else is different will cook it precisely as you say and he has over or under cooked it. That's why I use IT.

But I guess he does need a basic time scale and 12 hours is about right. These things are okay to sit so I alway give myself a couple more in case there is a problem.


I never blame anyone for advice they give or contribute my cook to them. Remember I am an egotistical somonavitch. Even if I screw up a cook I own up to it.

I just didn't have the money to cook up 60lbs of steamship to practice before this event. Usually when I cook something new or that I haven't really had a lot of experience with I do practice runs, but just couldn't this time.

Thanks again for the advice Donnie and the time table!:thumb:

cowgirl
06-09-2011, 01:21 AM
No advice from me.. just wanted to say Hey, where ya been? You've been missed! :-D
Good to see ya. :cool: