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highestgrade
05-07-2011, 11:24 PM
i gearing up to understand the smoked chicken process. I plan to brine for 4 hours then marinate overnight. then smoke hot at 300-350. question is.....do i apply the rub after brining then leave rub to set in overnight so that the rub flovour set in bone deep? I know bout cooking grill jerk chicken & i'll normally have the chicken sit overnight in the jerk seasoning. will this process be the same for the rub?

bobaftt
05-07-2011, 11:31 PM
Honestly I think that might be too much time in the marinade if you are brining. I usually brine for 6 hours (if I even brine) and then spatchcock the chicken and cook at 350 until it reaches the proper internal temperature.

highestgrade
05-07-2011, 11:35 PM
i've gotten great results with having chicken sit overnight soaking up the jerk seasoning. I don't really understand the rub process. If I apply the rub...how does it get INTO the meat? it will only flavour the outside

LMAJ
05-08-2011, 09:03 AM
I think you are over thinking this one - there are plenty of ways to smoke chicken. Some folks brine, or marinate, or rub, or a combo of the afore mentioned methods.
When I cook chicken I just rub the outside of the meat and toss it in the pit. Some folks like to get the rub between the meat and the skin -
I would suggest you start slow and try one thing at a time and see what works best for you and your tastes.
Good luck and let us know what you did and how it worked for you.

Cook
05-08-2011, 09:58 AM
You guys don't quite understand. One says too much time in the marinade if he's brining...the other says he's overthinking and to just season and throw it on the pit.

What you don't realize is that where highestgrade is from, they eat food that is more flavorful that you can imagine. It is flavorful because they season well and let food sit, seasoned, for many hours before cooking.

Brining, marinading, and rubbing may not be something we would do (it's not something I would do...and I live with a Trini), but he's looking for maximum flavor...as they always do.

My advise is to include your rub in the brine then do your marinade. Just before smoking add your exterior rub and place on the pit. The brine will take your rub flavor to the bone.

My chicken is seasoned with just three basic ingredients, but I hit it with my version of a T&T bbq sauce about half an hour before pulling it off the heat. My sauce contains a good amount of "seasnin". Highest grade will know what I'm talking about :thumb:

Wish I had an aloo pie with some cocount chutney for breakfast this morning. I'm starving.

woodfireguy
05-08-2011, 10:18 AM
I don’t have a recipe to share with you but maybe I can help you get your head around what’s happening. What the sodium does in brines, rubs and marinades is denaturing the protein solids.

Here’s a link to a description of the process.
http://www.foodsafety.wisc.edu/assets/pdf_Files/FFH_Brining.pdf

After you understand this you can create you're own killer recipe and process. I also think that 350 is to high, try 250-275 and pull at 150 or so. You can play with the heat to fit your style but that's my 2 cents

Cook
05-08-2011, 10:40 AM
I also think that 350 is to high

A differing of opinion here. 300-350 is my preferred temp to cook chicken these days.

Another word...if you're using wood to smoke, use it sparingly. Chicken can get over smokey pretty fast. Use less than half what you think you need. Adjustments can be made on the next cook if it is needed.

woodfireguy
05-08-2011, 10:49 AM
A differing of opinion here. 300-350 is my preferred temp to cook chicken these days.

Another word...if you're using wood to smoke, use it sparingly. Chicken can get over smokey pretty fast. Use less than half what you think you need. Adjustments can be made on the next cook if it is needed.


That's true. I guess it depends on what fuel and equipment you use. I hate too much pitch in my food.

highestgrade
05-09-2011, 12:06 PM
Thanks Cook.....I'm trying to get my hands on a 5lb bag of yardbird...I will mix with the brine as you said then rub on surface...let sit for a half hour or so then into the heat.....I got someone to bring me a bag of apple wood & mesquite chips. How much should I add to the coals?....I was thinking bout starting with a cup wrapped in foil & directly on the coals.

BTW I had 2 fry bake & salt fish buljol this morning for breakfast.

Cook
05-10-2011, 12:59 AM
Don't add much wood chips...especially the mesquite. Chicken can oversmoke easily. A light smoking wood like apple (and most fruit woods) are better to use. Mesquite is very strong. If you use it on chicken, only use a few chips at a time. I don't like mesquite on chicken, but that's me. Apple is your better choice here. Use a small handful at a time.

Haven't had buljol in a while, but did recently have some bake and shark. Love it with a bit of Chief tambran chutney.