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View Full Version : Night Train Brisket-FAIL..UTTER FAIL


Bamabuzzard
04-17-2011, 07:16 PM
Well, spent $31 on an 8lb flat this weekend and was going to do the Night Train brisket in the oven. When I've tried smoking one the problem I've had is that it falls completely part when I go to cut it.

Rather than staying together in slices it just peels part in shreds. So I figured I'd do the Night Train experiment and learn how to do it that way. Well I be %@#* if it didn't turn out the same way. I have no farkin' clue what I'm doing wrong.:confused:

I can cook the fark out of ribs, pork butt, turkey and chicken but crap my pants when it comes to brisket. Hell, I followed the instructions to a tee and still farked it up. Sorry for the rant but this is getting quite frustrating. I think I'm about to go eat a turd.

Sawdustguy
04-17-2011, 07:18 PM
Sounds like you are way overcooking it. At what temperature do you pull your brisket?

MilitantSquatter
04-17-2011, 07:20 PM
let's backtrack to the smoked brisket for a minute...A few questions that may help get you back on track

How are you cooking it (temps, any time in foil) ?

How are you judging doneness ?

Are you letting it rest ? If so, how long and in what holding device ?

How thick are you slicing it ?

gtr
04-17-2011, 07:33 PM
^^^great questions from Militant Squatter. I'm really looking at the question of how thick/thin are you slicing it. I believe some of those TX fellers, T included, are slicing pretty thick (which I see as a good thing btw).

If briskets are too much of a pita, check out the chuckies. But, if you're anything like me, you ain't gonna let go until you kick its arse. :heh:

The night train experiment calls for a 5# brisket, so it seems you'd have an underdone rather than overdone brisket with an 8#er. Have you confirmed your oven temp is accurate?

---k---
04-17-2011, 07:50 PM
Stupid question, are you slicing across the grain?

Bamabuzzard
04-17-2011, 07:58 PM
let's backtrack to the smoked brisket for a minute...A few questions that may help get you back on track

How are you cooking it (temps, any time in foil) ?

How are you judging doneness ?

Are you letting it rest ? If so, how long and in what holding device ?

How thick are you slicing it ?

How are you cooking it (temps, any time in foil) ?- Foiled it, oven set at 275, cooked 8 lb brisket for 7 hrs. I used the same time ratio given for the 5 lb.

How are you judging doneness ?- With this experiment I let it cook the time that I figured it would. The 5 lb brisket is to be cooked 4-4.5 hours. So I cooked my 8 lb 7 hrs.

Are you letting it rest ? If so, how long and in what holding device ?- Yes. 1 hour. In the foil it cooked in.

How thick are you slicing it? 1 inch as instructed. And across the grain.

MilitantSquatter
04-17-2011, 08:29 PM
My guess is you've overcooked it a bit..

Your application of the ratio of hrs/lb may not be a perfect science... Nor do I know if Donnie's original intent was for the experiment to be so rigid in the cooking time.... Also remember, that ovens usually aren't a steady temp (ex. 275) , but at times could push even higher...several variables can affect your result.

I think you're closer than you think... don't give up on cooking it on the smoker just yet.

Cook
04-18-2011, 09:30 AM
How are you judging doneness ?- With this experiment I let it cook the time that I figured it would. The 5 lb brisket is to be cooked 4-4.5 hours. So I cooked my 8 lb 7 hrs.

You never gave a meat temperature. Did you take it or did you cook solely based on time?

Cooking on time alone is a sure path to failure more times than not.

gsmith
04-18-2011, 09:43 AM
Interesting - I cooked a 5 pounder yesterday following the same directions and it came out fantastic. 275 for 4:15 let it rest for an hour, removed the juices and man was there ever some juices, then under the broiler for 10 minutes +/-
It was very tender, juicy and delicious

Like others have said I think you cooked yours too long

Bamabuzzard
04-18-2011, 10:07 AM
You never gave a meat temperature. Did you take it or did you cook solely based on time?

Cooking on time alone is a sure path to failure more times than not.

I cooked soley by the time because the instructions said wrap it in foil and do not peek until the timer beeps. But it was user error (ME) and not the instructions for the brisket. It called for a 5 lb flat and I couldn't find a 5 lb flat so I bought the smallest one the store had which was 8 lb and cooked it 7 hrs in foil. Obviously it was too much.

HOG WILD BBQ
04-18-2011, 10:08 AM
cooking it too hot. lower to 225

Bamabuzzard
04-18-2011, 10:09 AM
Interesting - I cooked a 5 pounder yesterday following the same directions and it came out fantastic. 275 for 4:15 let it rest for an hour, removed the juices and man was there ever some juices, then under the broiler for 10 minutes +/-
It was very tender, juicy and delicious

Like others have said I think you cooked yours too long

Yep, I had to estimate on the time because I was using an 8 lb flat. I followed the same ratio as the 5 lb brisket and applied it to the 8 lb one and obviously that was the incorrect thing to do. Oh well, you live and learn...

landarc
04-18-2011, 02:11 PM
The timing is no linear in a braise. In the Nightrain experiment, you are braising and the amount of time it takes to get done will not track in a strict mathematical ratio due to the vagaries of how mass takes and transfers heat as well as the moisture content and shape of said mass. Oddly, the amount of time cooking the 8lb brisket roast would have been very close to the time for the 5lb roast. As you heat the moist environment in the foil, you are actually raising the temperature of the liquids inside of the roast at the same time. Given that the larger flatter shape is going to heat from all sides at the same time, and given the flat shape, the interior moisture is heating at about the same rate despite the weight difference. This means that the actual rendering of the connective tissue will begin to occur at about the same time, and the stall as connective tissue renders will be about the same. The primary difference being the total amount of connective tissue rendering.

In a smoker, this actually also applies. Hence, the mystery of how a 10lb packer and a 14lb packer can both take 12 hours to cook. Part of the problem with using time, versus feel, is that the individual composition of meat varies widely (hence the 22 hour pork butt). Heat penetration is influenced by mass and shape of meat. Oddly, mass of a given roast is determined by both density of tissue and amount of internal moisture.

The major difference in timing is actually in the composition of the meat, not the weight alone. You're more likely to have succeeded with a 5.5 hour cook time over an 7 hour cook time. I would give it another shot. This time with the shorter cook time. And a smaller cut of brisket to save a little money.

Cook
04-18-2011, 02:15 PM
I cooked soley by the time because the instructions said wrap it in foil and do not peek until the timer beeps. But it was user error (ME) and not the instructions for the brisket. It called for a 5 lb flat and I couldn't find a 5 lb flat so I bought the smallest one the store had which was 8 lb and cooked it 7 hrs in foil. Obviously it was too much.

You do know that thermometers generally have a pointy end...and foil isn't bulletproff :-D

Bamabuzzard
04-18-2011, 02:18 PM
The major difference in timing is actually in the composition of the meat, not the weight alone. You're more likely to have succeeded with a 5.5 hour cook time over an 7 hour cook time. I would give it another shot. This time with the shorter cook time. And a smaller cut of brisket to save a little money.

I appreciate the information I didn't know that. :thumb: It's just frustrating as all get out to spend that kind of money and screw it up. I didn't totally screw it up because it still tasted good.

landarc
04-18-2011, 02:20 PM
Some places call over-cooked brisket chopped brisket and claim that is what they meant to do. I recommend that method to you as well. :becky:

Marck
04-18-2011, 02:51 PM
Some places call over-cooked brisket chopped brisket and claim that is what they meant to do. I recommend that method to you as well. :becky:

Heck yeah, put the leftovers of an overcooked brisket in the crock pot the next day with some beef broth to re-heat and everyone will love your chopped brisket, makes it all moist again.

Black Dog BBQ
04-18-2011, 03:08 PM
Heck yeah, put the leftovers of an overcooked brisket in the crock pot the next day with some beef broth to re-heat and everyone will love your chopped brisket, makes it all moist again.

Yup, been there done that!

QDoc
04-18-2011, 05:29 PM
That " rule of minutes per pound" is more related to a mass of meat that is basically "round" ie. whole chicken, turkey, steamship round roasts, primerib roasts etc. Think of cooking a burger, a 1/4 pounder will cook at the same time as a 1/2 pounder if the thickness is equal.

gtr
04-18-2011, 05:42 PM
chopped/pulled/shredded beef by itself on white bread wrapped kinda like a taco - nuthin' to be upset about there :thumb:

JiveTurkey
04-18-2011, 08:10 PM
I did the night train a while back but I was not sure how big the flat was. It might have been more than 5 pounds, probably was. I still followed the instructions to a T and I adjusted my oven to be the correct temp since my oven runs about 15* low. It came out really good and gave me a good baseline to aim for when doing them on the BBQ. Try it again.

Bamabuzzard
04-18-2011, 08:27 PM
Thank you guys for the encouragement. I think my problem was....well....ME...ME trying to be to "smart" about. I think I will try it again!!!!

BBQchef33
04-18-2011, 08:39 PM
The timing is no linear in a braise. In the Nightrain experiment, you are braising and the amount of time it takes to get done will not track in a strict mathematical ratio due to the vagaries of how mass takes and transfers heat as well as the moisture content and shape of said mass. Oddly, the amount of time cooking the 8lb brisket roast would have been very close to the time for the 5lb roast. As you heat the moist environment in the foil, you are actually raising the temperature of the liquids inside of the roast at the same time. Given that the larger flatter shape is going to heat from all sides at the same time, and given the flat shape, the interior moisture is heating at about the same rate despite the weight difference. This means that the actual rendering of the connective tissue will begin to occur at about the same time, and the stall as connective tissue renders will be about the same. The primary difference being the total amount of connective tissue rendering.

In a smoker, this actually also applies. Hence, the mystery of how a 10lb packer and a 14lb packer can both take 12 hours to cook. Part of the problem with using time, versus feel, is that the individual composition of meat varies widely (hence the 22 hour pork butt). Heat penetration is influenced by mass and shape of meat. Oddly, mass of a given roast is determined by both density of tissue and amount of internal moisture.

The major difference in timing is actually in the composition of the meat, not the weight alone. You're more likely to have succeeded with a 5.5 hour cook time over an 7 hour cook time. I would give it another shot. This time with the shorter cook time. And a smaller cut of brisket to save a little money.



Overcooked.... and ^^^^^^^^ thats why. :clap2:

Wampus
04-18-2011, 09:24 PM
OK, I'm not familiar with "Night Train Brisket", but is there something against the rules of said technique where you can't stick a remote thermo through the foil and then just keep an eye on it.....just in case?

Just sayin.
Maybe that doesn't make it "Night Train Brisket" but at least it wouldn't have to be chopped brisket.


.....?

Cook
04-19-2011, 10:09 AM
OK, I'm not familiar with "Night Train Brisket", but is there something against the rules of said technique where you can't stick a remote thermo through the foil and then just keep an eye on it.....just in case?

Just sayin.
Maybe that doesn't make it "Night Train Brisket" but at least it wouldn't have to be chopped brisket.


.....?

Exactly! Someone with common sense...I love it! :clap2:

GEORGIA BULLHAWGS
04-19-2011, 02:17 PM
Are you adding anything to it when you are getting ready to cook?

Any liquids or meat rubs?

Bamabuzzard
04-19-2011, 03:06 PM
OK, I'm not familiar with "Night Train Brisket", but is there something against the rules of said technique where you can't stick a remote thermo through the foil and then just keep an eye on it.....just in case?

Just sayin.
Maybe that doesn't make it "Night Train Brisket" but at least it wouldn't have to be chopped brisket.


.....?

I do not have one. Also, I've been told that one can be fooled going by temp alone. That ultimately "its done when it's done" comes from feel and not necessarily a reading on a thermo. I guess that is why you get a lot of people that say "But I pulled it when the thermo read 190 or 200 yet it was still a bit tough".

But yeah, if I would have had a thermo I could at least monitored it better but I didn't have one. And could have still been susceptible to going the other way with it and pulling it too early. I think that is the intent of the "Night Train" brisket experiment. Going by feel is more accurate than by a number on a screen. But you have to know what "that feel" is to be able to reference to it when cooking brisket. :boxing:

GEORGIA BULLHAWGS
04-19-2011, 03:11 PM
You are correct about feel, but you have been going by time.

Not temp or feel. Temp gets you in the ball park, feel then gets your around the bases. (hmmm, in more ways that one I might add.)

GrillsGoneWild
04-19-2011, 03:27 PM
By the way, use an electric knife to slice it unless you have a VERY good slicing knife. A buddy of mine complained about his brisket breaking up when slicing and then he went to the electric knife with no problems.

Wampus
04-19-2011, 03:30 PM
I do not have one. Also, I've been told that one can be fooled going by temp alone. That ultimately "its done when it's done" comes from feel and not necessarily a reading on a thermo. I guess that is why you get a lot of people that say "But I pulled it when the thermo read 190 or 200 yet it was still a bit tough".

But yeah, if I would have had a thermo I could at least monitored it better but I didn't have one. And could have still been susceptible to going the other way with it and pulling it too early. I think that is the intent of the "Night Train" brisket experiment. Going by feel is more accurate than by a number on a screen. But you have to know what "that feel" is to be able to reference to it when cooking brisket. :boxing:

Yes, I get that. I absolutely agree that you can't JUST go by temp. But What I'm trying to say is what VVVVV HE VVVVV said..

You are correct about feel, but you have been going by time.

Not temp or feel. Temp gets you in the ball park, feel then gets your around the bases. (hmmm, in more ways that one I might add.)

I only use thermos to tell when I need to start "feeling". No need to even lift the lid if the temp is below 170. When it hits 185-190, THEN I'll start sticking it. Then I just watch it and if it's close, wait another 5 degrees, poke it....nope not yet....another 5 degrees.....poke it again....Oooooo ALMOST......another 5 degrees.....and then BOOM! PERFECT!!!

I've not experienced this problem yet, but as I understand brisket...there's a pretty narrow window. Once you miss it, it's just overcooked.

Bamabuzzard
04-19-2011, 03:53 PM
Yes, I get that. I absolutely agree that you can't JUST go by temp. But What I'm trying to say is what VVVVV HE VVVVV said..



I only use thermos to tell when I need to start "feeling". No need to even lift the lid if the temp is below 170. When it hits 185-190, THEN I'll start sticking it. Then I just watch it and if it's close, wait another 5 degrees, poke it....nope not yet....another 5 degrees.....poke it again....Oooooo ALMOST......another 5 degrees.....and then BOOM! PERFECT!!!

I've not experienced this problem yet, but as I understand brisket...there's a pretty narrow window. Once you miss it, it's just overcooked.

If I had a thermo probe I'd agree. But I don't have one. Also with the exception of me thinking I had to estimate on the cooking time (due to the weight difference) I wanted to follow the directions to a tee. So i did.

Either way I've learned a lot in this thread so I'll try it again and see what happens. :thumb:

gsmith
04-19-2011, 04:26 PM
If I had a thermo probe I'd agree. But I don't have one. Also with the exception of me thinking I had to estimate on the cooking time (due to the weight difference) I wanted to follow the directions to a tee. So i did.

Either way I've learned a lot in this thread so I'll try it again and see what happens. :thumb:

That's the right attitude and I'm sure the next one you do will give you exactly what you are looking for :thumb:

Bamabuzzard
04-19-2011, 04:35 PM
That's the right attitude and I'm sure the next one you do will give you exactly what you are looking for :thumb:

I think you'r right especially since I've now learned that an eight lb brisket will be done relatively about the same time as a five pounder when doing this experiment. I love this forum. :clap2:

The Smokin Texan
04-19-2011, 04:49 PM
Shread the brisket up into little peices and then mix with your choice of BBQ sauce. It makes for an awsome sandwich. I have screwed up brisket in a similar way but never let it go to waste.

El Ropo
04-19-2011, 04:52 PM
Exactly! Someone with common sense...I love it! :clap2:

The purpose for this exersize is to be able to feel the probe go into the meat like butter. There is no mention of using a temp probe in this experiment, ASFAIK. It's a training op for probe tenderness testing.

You are missing the point of the whole (nice) training opportunity.

It's all about being able to tell when a brisket is done without using a friggin' thermometer!

jimmyinsd
04-19-2011, 04:58 PM
If I had a thermo probe I'd agree. But I don't have one. Also with the exception of me thinking I had to estimate on the cooking time (due to the weight difference) I wanted to follow the directions to a tee. So i did.

Either way I've learned a lot in this thread so I'll try it again and see what happens. :thumb:


even if the coin isnt there for a thermopen, stop at target or where ever and grab one of those $10 digital ones or an even cheaper dial type meat thermo. you will have to wait and additional 6.7 seconds for your reading, but you will have a reading as well as a sharp pointy object for probing your meat.:shocked:

Cook
04-19-2011, 07:01 PM
The purpose for this exersize is to be able to feel the probe go into the meat like butter. There is no mention of using a temp probe in this experiment, ASFAIK. It's a training op for probe tenderness testing.

You are missing the point of the whole (nice) training opportunity.

It's all about being able to tell when a brisket is done without using a friggin' thermometer!

I'll be honest...I have no idea what you're talking about. :thumb:

nolaman
04-19-2011, 08:33 PM
The purpose for this exercise is to be able to feel the probe go into the meat like butter. There is no mention of using a temp probe in this experiment, ASFAIK. It's a training op for probe tenderness testing.

You are missing the point of the whole (nice) training opportunity.

It's all about being able to tell when a brisket is done without using a friggin' thermometer!
El Ropo is right! No disrespect to any brethren out there. All responses are great! Sticking a probe is a great way to tell what going on inside while cooking! But the purpose of Donnie's Night Train thread, was to teach how a brisket should feel when is probe tender. A great tasting brisket is a result! I would try it again. Buy a temp gauge, check your oven temp. Don't sway from the experiment, trim the briskie down to 5# as stated. Use the 3# for stew meat or chili!:thumb:

El Ropo
04-19-2011, 08:34 PM
I'll be honest...I have no idea what you're talking about.

I already knew that :)

Was just trying to clue you in.

Cook
04-20-2011, 08:42 AM
El Ropo, I sort of read that Night Train OP...hard read so I just scanned over it. I get the "experiment" part...steam a brisket in foil for a certain amount of time and let a probe (for me that's always my thermometer) slide in and feel no resistance. Got it.

Now...I use my thermo as a probe because I feel it's one of my best tools for the job. If you have a problem with the friggin' thermometer, then that's your issue.

The OP of this thread way overcooked a brisket. Keeping an eye on the actual temperature would have helped him...along with checking tenderness. I guess everyone has different ways of teaching and learning.

Have a wonderful friggin' day!

GEORGIA BULLHAWGS
04-21-2011, 10:56 AM
Amazon.com: Taylor 1470 Digital Cooking Thermometer/Timer: Kitchen & Dining@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41DppVFaqzL.@@AMEPARAM@@41DppVFaqzL (http://www.amazon.com/Taylor-1470-Digital-Cooking-Thermometer/dp/B00004XSC5)

This is the thermometer that I use. I have 2 of them, they work very well.

The probe and the lead that plugs into the machine can withstand 392* without damage, which you should never encounter when smoking.

You stick the probe in to the part of the meat that you are wanting to make sure is done before pulling, and when it gets close to the temp you know is done, that is when you check things out and go by feel of everything.

I put the probe into the point in the brisket, and when it gets to 190* I start probing it to see where the meat is at. If it is still resisting the probe, I cook longer, like mentioned above 5* increments is a good standard. When it clides in and out without any resistance, pull it, and let it rest.

There is nothing wrong with using a thermometer, and in fact in my opinion a crap shoot when you are not using one.

BigDaddyJT
04-21-2011, 11:32 AM
You need to give it another go... Just start probing for doness 1 hour before your targeted completion time. Practice makes perfect. Not to mention you get to eat more as well!! Good luck on your next cook.

BTW - You need to cook briskets on your Stumps or BWS w/ bit of hickory :thumb:. just my $0.2


JT

Pitmaster T
10-12-2011, 07:01 PM
why was I not made aware of this? Someone should have called. You overestimated your cooking time. You should have checked at five hours or 5.5 hours I would bet.

I set only a few parameters... brisket weight, seasons used, materials used (foil and oven temp and time. In an experiment used to establish consistency you cannot dabble with the variables and expect the same results or wing it.

I would have cut the brisket in half and cooked tow halves, maybe pulling one out at 5 and the other at another time.

The texture may be too cooked for some if you follow it BUT... the experiment's purpose was to address all those guys who never had a tender brisket (either at a restaurant or when they cook) to show them what brisket can be... then aim for that on the pit, or dial it back if needed. Sound like you already got to tender and need to dial it back.

Pitmaster T
10-12-2011, 07:07 PM
El Ropo, I sort of read that Night Train OP...hard read so I just scanned over it.

The OP of this thread way overcooked a brisket. Keeping an eye on the actual temperature would have helped him...along with checking tenderness.

Always consider how well a person admits they read over something before listening to what they have to say. This poster totally misses the point, admits he scanned it but failed to comprehend the purpose of the thread... hopefully because he didn't read it.

In addition, overcooked is a regional preference... some "contests" have half inch slices....

as mentioned, the problem is too many err on the "underdone side" and not the overdone side. In addition, of the many consultations I have done for restaurants I have always maintained NEVER try and please the contest standards guy. Your customers will rarely fault you for your BBQ falling apart. The ones that do are the minority.

Had this poster read the (admittedly and purposely hard to decipher) thread closely, he would have noted all these points. That the experiment was to show the zenith of tenderness a brisket can achieve.

caliking
10-12-2011, 07:31 PM
OK... since nobody has said this yet... keep doing what you are doing and send me the results for me to taste and be the judge :becky:

Honestly though, the others have given you great tips. Don't beat yourself up over this bro - if at first you don't succeed, try again! Your other que is great, soon you'll add a fantastic brisket to your repertoire.

RevZiLLa
10-12-2011, 09:32 PM
You had the balls to try it, the honesty to tell us how you did it, and the curiosity to find out how to get it right.

100% success!

Zin
10-12-2011, 11:12 PM
Bamabuzzard, try cooking your next brisket to a temp of 160, that is the last time you will check temps no need to check brisket temp anymore, now just finish cooking the brisket to tender simple, when you can insert a probe into the brisket and it feels like butta no resistance at all its perfect. Let rest for about 30 mins and start eating.

SmokeUSum
11-08-2013, 09:30 PM
You do know that thermometers generally have a pointy end...and foil isn't bulletproff :-D

Lol, too farking cute... But I didn't see a question regarding where this outlaw, uncompromising cow was purchased. Sorry if it's a dumb question, I'm just learning how to slay the dumb beast, but I have found blade-tenderized moo-moo's do not play well with those that know how to spank it outside a crockpot, which to me is the lowest form of cooking known to (wo)man.

Blade-tenderized brisket is hugely common with national chains and wholesale clubs. It retards the meat, is hugely unsanitary, and will distort how the meat acts. So where'd you get your brisket that sounds like it was tenderized Under The Dome?

Dadeo719
11-08-2013, 11:05 PM
The timing is no linear in a braise. In the Nightrain experiment, you are braising and the amount of time it takes to get done will not track in a strict mathematical ratio due to the vagaries of how mass takes and transfers heat as well as the moisture content and shape of said mass. Oddly, the amount of time cooking the 8lb brisket roast would have been very close to the time for the 5lb roast. As you heat the moist environment in the foil, you are actually raising the temperature of the liquids inside of the roast at the same time. Given that the larger flatter shape is going to heat from all sides at the same time, and given the flat shape, the interior moisture is heating at about the same rate despite the weight difference. This means that the actual rendering of the connective tissue will begin to occur at about the same time, and the stall as connective tissue renders will be about the same. The primary difference being the total amount of connective tissue rendering.

In a smoker, this actually also applies. Hence, the mystery of how a 10lb packer and a 14lb packer can both take 12 hours to cook. Part of the problem with using time, versus feel, is that the individual composition of meat varies widely (hence the 22 hour pork butt). Heat penetration is influenced by mass and shape of meat. Oddly, mass of a given roast is determined by both density of tissue and amount of internal moisture.

The major difference in timing is actually in the composition of the meat, not the weight alone. You're more likely to have succeeded with a 5.5 hour cook time over an 7 hour cook time. I would give it another shot. This time with the shorter cook time. And a smaller cut of brisket to save a little money.

Dude you just stoked my inner math, science, and BBQ nerdness. If you don't use this as your dissertation for a Doctorate in BBQ I'm stealing it. :clap2:

swamprb
11-09-2013, 11:50 AM
the Funk was not with you!

deguerre
11-09-2013, 11:58 AM
http://content.internetvideoarchive.com/content/photos/195/00820214_.jpg (http://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&docid=la5osoTPTVo1iM&tbnid=7PverXDw8iCxhM:&ved=0CAUQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.metacritic.com%2Fmovie%2Fblas t-from-the-past&ei=7Xd-UrmKG8GTkQeEvIHYAg&psig=AFQjCNGqSNJYbpSr2CrExmn639meMq7Gdw&ust=1384106313119383)

Pitmaster T
01-01-2014, 12:50 PM
No two women Funk the same. And even the same women may funk you one way when you meet her, then years later won't dream of funking you that way again.

Women = brisket Funk = heat/time

Fwismoker
01-01-2014, 01:01 PM
Too much brasing and never go by time...only probe tender

Pitmaster T
11-09-2014, 08:16 AM
http://youtu.be/FvUVyANtXXQ