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caseydog
02-09-2011, 07:01 PM
I'd like to add some rosemary flavor to my smoke for some chicken.

Has anyone done this? How well does it work. How much do you use? How do you do it?

My instincts are telling me to add some fresh stalks (from my garden) above the hot coals, but will that work, or just burn up and/or leave a burnt herb taste.

CD

btcg
02-09-2011, 07:17 PM
My first wife used to make a rosemary chicken dish, and it was damn good. I'd rub it on the chicken, instead of smoking it.

CarolinaQue
02-09-2011, 07:18 PM
Casey,

I do it some what often. More so when I cook on the Kettle. I usually soak it and wood chunks in white wine and apple juice. I thik it gives a great flavor and aroma to the meat. Much suited for chicken and pork!!!

caseydog
02-09-2011, 07:30 PM
Casey,

I do it some what often. More so when I cook on the Kettle. I usually soak it and wood chunks in white wine and apple juice. I thik it gives a great flavor and aroma to the meat. Much suited for chicken and pork!!!

Do you put the rosemary right on the charcoal, the same as you would do with wood chunks?

Or, should I wrap it in punctured foil like you would with wood chips?

CD

Cast Iron Chef
02-09-2011, 07:35 PM
I like to take rosemary and garlic in melted butter and brush on the chicken. I do it several times while cooking.

NorthwestBBQ
02-09-2011, 07:39 PM
Do not do it. It's a waste of time and spice.

zydecopaws
02-09-2011, 07:42 PM
When I use fresh rosemary in a rub, I always take the stems and throw them in the coals. Smells good for a few minutes, but I doubt it has that much effect as it burns off so quickly.

El Lobo
02-09-2011, 08:02 PM
What about in a water dish (like potpourri, sort of)? Still not worth it?

caseydog
02-09-2011, 08:05 PM
Do not do it. It's a waste of time and spice.

I take it you have tried it? Does the herb flavor just not come through?

CD

NorthwestBBQ
02-09-2011, 08:08 PM
I take it you have tried it? Does the herb flavor just not come through?

CD

I have not tried it but I do understand how smoking meat works.

It won't work. If it did, everyone would be doing it.

LT72884
02-09-2011, 08:16 PM
If it did, everyone would be doing it.


i jumped off a cliff once!

btcg
02-09-2011, 08:16 PM
Rub it on the chicken with the butter Casey, you'll like it.

BlueHowler
02-09-2011, 09:24 PM
I've tried it several times with rosemary and do not really notice a difference in flavor. Fresh garlic cloves thrown on the hot charcoal can give a bit of flavor but a nice marinade or herb rub will work better.

SirPorkaLot
02-09-2011, 09:52 PM
Some herbs do work well I'm smoke, I have not tried Rosemary.
What does work nice are tea leaves. Put them directly on coals AFTER making tea. The the soaked tea leaves keep them from burning up right away, and the tea smoke does give a hint of flavor

NorthwestBBQ
02-09-2011, 10:08 PM
Some herbs do work well I'm smoke, I have not tried Rosemary.
What does work nice are tea leaves. Put them directly on coals AFTER making tea. The the soaked tea leaves keep them from burning up right away, and the tea smoke does give a hint of flavor

:puke:

SirPorkaLot
02-09-2011, 10:09 PM
:puke:

Thanks for the input. ;)

NorthwestBBQ
02-09-2011, 10:20 PM
Thanks for the input. ;)

Do you want the truth or a complementary lie? Try it you might, but I fear, based on my experience, it is not a good idea. Google it, that will tell you what the consensus is...

schellter
02-09-2011, 10:50 PM
When grilling I put the rosemary on top of the grill and the meat on top of the rosemary. There is some flavor transfer with this method but not a lot.

NorthwestBBQ
02-09-2011, 10:53 PM
When grilling I put the rosemary on top of the grill and the meat on top of the rosemary. There is some flavor transfer with this method but not a lot.

Do you have any pics or posts about this?

LongTong
02-09-2011, 10:56 PM
We are fortunate to have several Rosemary bushes nearby that provide fresh stalks year round here in Socal. We sprinkle on top of chicken during the cook and throw several fresh stalks on the smoldering coals. The fresh stalks give off a nice aroma before burning up. Dried Rosemary would be a waste as it burns up too fast...

caseydog
02-09-2011, 11:29 PM
Okay, I am getting some good information here. It seems like, to get good flavor, it is more important to have the herbs in contact with the meat, than it is to burn them.

So, I am leaning towards putting some rosemary on top of my meat, with some olive oil to make a connection. That direct connection seems to be a common thread, here. The herbal smoke doesn't seem to be very popular.

I have used herbs to stuff poultry and pork, and have stuffed it under the skin of poultry. That has worked well. So, I wondered if turning herbs into smoke would flavor the same meats.

I may still try it, just for grins, but I'm now inclined to believe it may not yield the kind of results I was hoping for.

CD

BBQ Grail
02-09-2011, 11:32 PM
Look at the herbs like you would if you were plank cooking some chicken. The herbs go under the chicken. Get them good and wet, place them on the grate and then place the chicken on top of the herbs. This will give you a mild herb flavor. Try something like Herbs de Provence if you want it a little different.

I do this with planks. You can soak the plank, then put the herbs on top of the plank and then fish or chicken on top of that.

NorthwestBBQ
02-09-2011, 11:39 PM
It's about osmosis, boys.

Brewer
02-10-2011, 12:16 AM
IMHO... Rosemary is for roasting not BBQ. The only exception is Lamb. Low and slow Lamb with a Rosemary-Mint rub is incredible.

smokeyw
02-10-2011, 05:59 AM
I sometimes put Rosemary in the water pan when smoking chicken. It is good :thumb:

CarolinaQue
02-10-2011, 07:33 AM
It's about osmosis, boys.

So why rub meat if it's all about osmosis? Is it not to flavor the outside of the meat? So why would rosemary not benifit chicken or pork tenderloin that only get's a kiss of smoke because it isn't on long enough?

CarolinaQue
02-10-2011, 07:37 AM
I have not tried it but I do understand how smoking meat works.

It won't work. If it did, everyone would be doing it.


Three things:

1) Because you never tried but "know how smoking meat works" it is all that needs to be said that it won't benifit? I wonder if people were saying the same thing when Myron came on the scene with his hot and fast cooking technique? Or any other # of things that that ignorance could be applied to. It would sound something like this: Heck, no one else has done it, I know how things are suppose to work, so we're not even going to try to see if I may be wrong.

2) Not every thing is all about competition que. Maybe back yard days are done just a bit different, and some on here only cook that style?

3) If subtleties like smoke flavor don't really matter or benifit, then why do people use specific types of wood for certain types of meat? Such as a stronger wood smoke like mesquite or hickory for beef, and mellower woods like apple, peach and cherry for poultry and pork?

CarolinaQue
02-10-2011, 07:43 AM
Do you put the rosemary right on the charcoal, the same as you would do with wood chunks?

Or, should I wrap it in punctured foil like you would with wood chips?

CD

Casey,

Yes, I do put the sprigs right on the coals. They do burn relatively fast, but the method is only for a kiss of smoke. I also like to put thighs meat side down on a ges of soaked sprigs when I use my WSM with out the pan. The coals are so far below, it won't burn the sprigs up and gives it a nice long infusion.

It comes down to this, experimentation is the key. Try different things and see if you like the result. Not every one does every thing the same, and not every one likes the same results.

btcg
02-10-2011, 08:12 AM
Two things:

1) Because you never tried it is all that needs to be said that it won't benifit? I wonder if people were saying the same thing when Myron came on the scene with his hot and fast cooking technique? Or any other # of things that that ignorance could be applied to. It would sound something like this: Heck, no one else has done it, I know how things are suppose to work, so we're not even going to try to see if I may be wrong.

2) Not every thing is all about competition que. Maybe back yard days are done just a bit different, and some on here only cook that style?


Myron also told us this in class:

Barbecue is simple food. Do not waste your time with exotic flavor additions. Donít make the cook hard.

And that was his advice for comp, or backyard cooking.

Even wet, it would take a ton of rosemary to smoke chicken.

I think a good point has been made: if it was a good technique, it would be widely in use. But, it's a free country.

CarolinaQue
02-10-2011, 08:17 AM
So that means that people shouldn't try it? All of us taste different things. If you spread it out enough, you could make a bundle of rosemary last an entire cook of grilled chicken.

And my Myron comparison was in reference to the likelyness that many were probably saying that he would never do well using the techniques he did.

BBQ Grail
02-10-2011, 08:17 AM
Myron also told us this in class:

Barbecue is simple food. Do not waste your time with exotic flavor additions. Don’t make the cook hard.

And that was his advice for comp, or backyard cooking.

Even wet, it would take a ton of rosemary to smoke chicken.

I think a good point has been made: if it was a good technique, it would be widely in use. But, it's a free country.

Myron is wrong...

At least on this point. He is popular, he is good, he is famous. But he is NOT the know all, be all of BBQ/Grilling.

Some of the techniques described in this thread are good technigues and are widely in use. When it comes to comp BBQ I will defer to Myron and his techniques. When it comes to turning out a nice meal to share with family and friends in my backyard I will defer to Adam Perry Lang and other well known BBQ CHEFS.

jaxbbq
02-10-2011, 08:24 AM
IMNSHO there is so much resin in the rosemary that no matter how long you smoke it it will burn very quickly. You will get a very quick burst of aroma and it is gone. I have used stems about 1/2" across in BIG bundles. It make for great smelling smoke but the resins gave the meat a slightly bitter taste. Chopped and mixed with garlic and olive oil gives a good flavor when grilling. Just my $0.02

BBQ Grail
02-10-2011, 08:27 AM
IMNSHO there is so much resin in the rosemary that no matter how long you smoke it it will burn very quickly. You will get a very quick burst of aroma and it is gone. I have used stems about 1/2" across in BIG bundles. It make for great smelling smoke but the resins gave the meat a slightly bitter taste. Chopped and mixed with garlic and olive oil gives a good flavor when grilling. Just my $0.02

This is correct. Which is why if you are using rosemary IN the fire you need to use dried rosemary. If you lay it directly on the grates and then place the chicken on top of the rosemary you won't get that bitter flavor, because you aren't burning it.

Phubar
02-10-2011, 08:35 AM
I've tried it once with dried rozemary but I also used smokewood so I can't tell you the results.

btcg
02-10-2011, 08:38 AM
So that means that people shouldn't try it? All of us taste different things. If you spread it out enough, you could make a bundle of rosemary last an entire cook of grilled chicken.

And my Myron comparison was in reference to the likelyness that many were probably saying that he would never do well using the techniques he did.


You bring up the question of:

"If subtleties like smoke flavor don't really matter or benifit, then why do people use specific types of wood for certain types of meat?"

Herbs and spices are not wood. They're not compact and dense like wood is: it burns for a long time, and I've found that at least an hour is needed using wood, to impart smokey flavor into my meats.

I think you'd need an awful lot of rosemary to burn for an hour.

As to people trying it or not, as I've said: it's a free country.

But consider: I recently pondered whether I could use my BWS as a stickburner. One of these same brothers advised against it. I considered it, and decided he was correct.

Sometimes, you've just got to weigh the benefits and make a decision on that. That's what this site is for.

btcg
02-10-2011, 08:43 AM
Myron is wrong...

At least on this point. He is popular, he is good, he is famous. But he is NOT the know all, be all of BBQ/Grilling.

Some of the techniques described in this thread are good technigues and are widely in use. When it comes to comp BBQ I will defer to Myron and his techniques. When it comes to turning out a nice meal to share with family and friends in my backyard I will defer to Adam Perry Lang and other well known BBQ CHEFS.

Of course, that's an opinion.

Having taken his class, and watched the man for hours, I can confirm Johnny Trigg's (I'll be taking his class next month) statement:

"Myron is one of the greatest cookers in the world."

Again, it's a free country, and we're all free to experiment.

But Myron's point is a good one, whether it's comp, or backyard:

BBQ is simple food: keep it simple.

Rick T
02-10-2011, 08:45 AM
From a Back yard guy,

After reading all this, it seems to me that what you wish to release from the rosemary or any herb is the oils/resins that make the flavor. To do this most effectively, would making a tea from the herbs placing in a pan (with a few coals) under the pork or chicken be effective or using the tea as an injection. Or would this have a minimal affect?

When roasting, I always sautaee the rosemary in olive oil, first for just a minute or so just till the aroma breaks, then rub the chicken or pork with that oil and rosemary.

Just a thought.
Rick

garyk1398
02-10-2011, 09:09 AM
Can't help ya on chicken but I always use rosemary leaves in my Cookshack smoker when doing a prime rib and think it adds a nice flavor. Good luck and let us know how it goes!

CarolinaQue
02-10-2011, 09:52 AM
You bring up the question of:

"If subtleties like smoke flavor don't really matter or benifit, then why do people use specific types of wood for certain types of meat?"

Herbs and spices are not wood. They're not compact and dense like wood is: it burns for a long time, and I've found that at least an hour is needed using wood, to impart smokey flavor into my meats.

I think you'd need an awful lot of rosemary to burn for an hour.

As to people trying it or not, as I've said: it's a free country.

But consider: I recently pondered whether I could use my BWS as a stickburner. One of these same brothers advised against it. I considered it, and decided he was correct.

Sometimes, you've just got to weigh the benefits and make a decision on that. That's what this site is for.

"But consider: I recently pondered whether I could use my BWS as a stickburner. One of these same brothers advised against it. I considered it, and decided he was correct."



Apples to oranges here IMO. Stick burning is much more involved that throwing sprigs of an herb on a fire.

Did you read the rest of what I said about using rosemary? The part where I lay the thighs on a bed of it in my WSM?

Like I said, it's all personal preferance. If you don't try, you'll never know. There are a # of things people in the BBQ world have thought crazy that have yielded good results. Why not keep an open mind?

btcg
02-10-2011, 10:12 AM
"But consider: I recently pondered whether I could use my BWS as a stickburner. One of these same brothers advised against it. I considered it, and decided he was correct."



Apples to oranges here IMO. Stick burning is much more involved that throwing sprigs of an herb on a fire.

Did you read the rest of what I said about using rosemary? The part where I lay the thighs on a bed of it in my WSM?

Like I said, it's all personal preferance. If you don't try, you'll never know. There are a # of things people in the BBQ world have thought crazy that have yielded good results. Why not keep an open mind?

I read what you said.

But you're ignoring a few basic points:

One of the brothers has told us:

He tried it: it gave his food a bitter taste.

And: if it takes a dense and compact smoke source such as wood a good hour to impart smoke taste, it would take a very large amount of rosemary to burn for an equal amount of time.

CarolinaQue
02-10-2011, 11:06 AM
I read what you said.

But you're ignoring a few basic points:

One of the brothers has told us:

He tried it: it gave his food a bitter taste.

And: if it takes a dense and compact smoke source such as wood a good hour to impart smoke taste, it would take a very large amount of rosemary to burn for an equal amount of time.

No, I'm not ignoring any thing. I have tried it, and I think that it works and adds something. So, because some one else tries it and it didn't work, no one else should? Maybe other variables are different? And other brethren have said that they have had good results. Do we discount those?

Please, let's not turn this into another charcoal thread!

btcg
02-10-2011, 11:16 AM
No, I'm not ignoring any thing. I have tried it, and I think that it works and adds something. So, because some one else tries it and it didn't work, no one else should? Maybe other variables are different?

Please, let's not turn this into another charcoal thread!

Sorry, don't get your logic.

I stated a few times now, it's a free country, and we're all free to experiment. I've also posed an answer to your position that you seemingly ignore.

This is a site where experienced people weigh in and offer advice.

From my experience, both Jax and Northwest are experienced and very knowledgeable.

Casey will have to weigh the evidence, and decide if he wants to try it.

Phubar
02-10-2011, 11:17 AM
If it works for you and your people...just do it!
I've ignored many things people said or suggested on this forum...just because of my own taste and/or the info people were giving don't made no sense to me.

CarolinaQue
02-10-2011, 11:27 AM
What am I ignoring exactly? I understand that it's a free country, so why tell some one not to even try because some one else didn't like the result? Why ignore the responses that others have tried it and liked the result? Since when is one persons experience the end all be all? Maybe the one that has success has a different variable in the mix than the others that didn't? There are many people with experience that have differing opinions.

I understand that the forum is for all opinions.

Phubar
02-10-2011, 11:36 AM
What am I ignoring exactly? I understand that it's a free country, so why tell some one not to even try because some one else didn't like the result? Why ignore the responses that others have tried it and liked the result? Since when is one persons experience the end all be all? Maybe the one that has success has a different variable in the mix than the others that didn't? There are many people with experience that have differing opinions.

I understand that the forum is for all opinions.


Do Your thang!
Take advice from Brethren/Sistern...or don't.:thumb:

btcg
02-10-2011, 11:39 AM
What am I ignoring exactly? I understand that it's a free country, so why tell some one not to even try because some one else didn't like the result? Why ignore the responses that others have tried it and liked the result? Since when is one persons experience the end all be all? Maybe the one that has success has a different variable in the mix than the others that didn't? There are many people with experience that have differing opinions.

I understand that the forum is for all opinions.

I'm going to answer that because I like you personally.... but this isn't personal, it's in keeping with the subject.

If it takes at least an hour (and I think 2 is closer to it) with wood, it's reasonable to expect it would take as long with rosemary.

And, I think it's reasonable to conclude that it would take a boatload of rosemary to burn for an hour.

Do we want to consider that maybe rosemary is a stronger flavor, and make it might take half that time, maybe 1/2 an hour?

If so, we come back to Northwest's point: let's see some evidence: other websites, written pieces, etc.

Maybe you thought he was dissing you. I didn't take it that way. He simply made a good point: if we're to debate its merits, let's do it on the basis of some hard evidence.

But in the end, it's Casey who will decide what works for him, just as you decide what works for you.

If we wish to leave it at that, then yes, an opinion like "I like using it, it worked well for me" is fine.

If we're to debate, let's do it based on objectivity. Nothing personal in that.

Fat Woody
02-10-2011, 12:03 PM
Do you want the truth or a complementary lie? Try it you might, but I fear, based on my experience, it is not a good idea. Google it, that will tell you what the consensus is...

Channeling Yoda are we?

Then there's this tidbit from http://www.thewhitegoddess.co.uk/herborium/rosemary.asp

"If you wish to receive knowledge or the answer to a question, burn rosemary on charcoal and smell its smoke. Rosemary is also grown to attract elves, and the powdered leaves wrapped in linen cloth and bound to the right arm dispel depression and make the emotions light and merry."

Gotta love Google!

Fat Woody
02-10-2011, 12:05 PM
So Casey - all you need to do is burn some rosemary and smell the smoke to get your answer...hmmmm.

CarolinaQue
02-10-2011, 01:03 PM
I'm going to answer that because I like you personally.... but this isn't personal, it's in keeping with the subject.

If it takes at least an hour (and I think 2 is closer to it) with wood, it's reasonable to expect it would take as long with rosemary.

And, I think it's reasonable to conclude that it would take a boatload of rosemary to burn for an hour.

Do we want to consider that maybe rosemary is a stronger flavor, and make it might take half that time, maybe 1/2 an hour?

If so, we come back to Northwest's point: let's see some evidence: other websites, written pieces, etc.

Maybe you thought he was dissing you. I didn't take it that way. He simply made a good point: if we're to debate its merits, let's do it on the basis of some hard evidence.

But in the end, it's Casey who will decide what works for him, just as you decide what works for you.

If we wish to leave it at that, then yes, an opinion like "I like using it, it worked well for me" is fine.

If we're to debate, let's do it based on objectivity. Nothing personal in that.


I never took it personally. I didn't think Northwest was dissing me either. I think that he came across a little snide, but what ever.

I don't know that I agree that you need an hour or more of smoke on chicken or other small custs though. Larger ones, yes. But things like thighs and tenderloins I think benifit in as little as 30 minutes.

I agree in debating objectively. But I also think that it is relative to a degree to say it works or doesn't work.

Backyard cooking is very different from competition cooking and different methods are used.

An example:

In Norwalk, we cooked some rib eyes and made an herb mop of rosemary, thyme and oregano. We had a small amount of melted butter that we dipped the mop into and then brushed the meat with it. The steak came out great. You could taste all of the herbs, and it was exposed for a very short amount of time.

The same could work for chicken I am sure. But again, what I do for home and competition are 2 different things.

I say let Casey do what he wants and see where the chips fall.

CarolinaQue
02-10-2011, 01:15 PM
Do Your thang!
Take advice from Brethren/Sistern...or don't.:thumb:


That's what I've been trying to say all along!!!:thumb::clap2:

Wampus
02-10-2011, 01:26 PM
Pretty good thread, I think. (not that MY opinion means anything special:heh::wink:)

I agree with BBQ Grail on this one. I'll never take anyone's sole opinion as some kind of gospel for anything. It's all about perception and what works for YOU. I've seen Myron work on TV and personally, I think he's kind of an arrogant arse. Doesn't mean he doesn't know what he's talking about with comp 'Q, though.

btcg: You claim that you need 1 or 2 hours of smoke to make a difference. If you read Paul Kirk's BBQ books, he tells you that you should always use the MINIMUM smoke possible. He gives a guideline of 1/4 total smoke time on the smoke and that's it. Anything more is oversmoking and bitter (according to him).

Again....it's OPINION. My brother has preached this time and time again to me and said, "You sure you're not smoking it too much? That's a lot of chunk you're putting on there!" My reply is usually, "Well, you let me know what you think come dinner time."

Does that mean we should never post here for advice? Hell no! This place is a WEALTH of information, but STILL....it's opinionated information.

caseydog posted and asked opinions on this. Several Brethren have offered theirs. It's up to him to take away what he wants to. Period.

I posted a thread last year about beechwood and if it was a good smokewood. I got PLENTY of opinions. Everything from, "It's a waste of time, don't use it." to "I use it all the time, it's GREAT!"

Can't say one way is wrong or right based on anyone's opinion.

There's been a post on this very thread that rosemary doesn't work for BBQ. I've used it in a rub on turkey, used whole sprigs under the legs on whole chickens and turkey, used it as a rub on pork loin, etc. I LOVE rosemary on BBQ. I think it compliments pork and poultry PERFECTLY. I'm NOT going to tell that brother that he's WRONG though.



Casey......try it. Let us know how it works for you. Or don't......up to you.:thumb:


I dig the debate, but don't see the need to get all worked up over it.
Sorry for the lengthy post......but then I do that, don't I?:laugh:

btcg
02-10-2011, 04:18 PM
Pretty good thread, I think. (not that MY opinion means anything special:heh::wink:)

I agree with BBQ Grail on this one. I'll never take anyone's sole opinion as some kind of gospel for anything. It's all about perception and what works for YOU. I've seen Myron work on TV and personally, I think he's kind of an arrogant arse. Doesn't mean he doesn't know what he's talking about with comp 'Q, though.

btcg: You claim that you need 1 or 2 hours of smoke to make a difference. If you read Paul Kirk's BBQ books, he tells you that you should always use the MINIMUM smoke possible. He gives a guideline of 1/4 total smoke time on the smoke and that's it. Anything more is oversmoking and bitter (according to him).

Again....it's OPINION. My brother has preached this time and time again to me and said, "You sure you're not smoking it too much? That's a lot of chunk you're putting on there!" My reply is usually, "Well, you let me know what you think come dinner time."

Does that mean we should never post here for advice? Hell no! This place is a WEALTH of information, but STILL....it's opinionated information.

caseydog posted and asked opinions on this. Several Brethren have offered theirs. It's up to him to take away what he wants to. Period.

I posted a thread last year about beechwood and if it was a good smokewood. I got PLENTY of opinions. Everything from, "It's a waste of time, don't use it." to "I use it all the time, it's GREAT!"

Can't say one way is wrong or right based on anyone's opinion.

There's been a post on this very thread that rosemary doesn't work for BBQ. I've used it in a rub on turkey, used whole sprigs under the legs on whole chickens and turkey, used it as a rub on pork loin, etc. I LOVE rosemary on BBQ. I think it compliments pork and poultry PERFECTLY. I'm NOT going to tell that brother that he's WRONG though.



Casey......try it. Let us know how it works for you. Or don't......up to you.:thumb:


I dig the debate, but don't see the need to get all worked up over it.
Sorry for the lengthy post......but then I do that, don't I?:laugh:

Well, if it's on TV, it must be true, eh? :-D

OakPit
02-10-2011, 06:04 PM
I like to take rosemary and garlic in melted butter and brush on the chicken. I do it several times while cooking.

Great tip! Much love for the compound butter.

landarc
02-10-2011, 06:19 PM
But he is NOT the know all, be all of BBQ/Grilling.
Okay, I am here cause Larry summoned me :becky:

I have tried various forms of using herbaceous materials and miscellaneous smaller forms of wood with little effect, in general, the smaller pieces burn up too fast for direct use on the fire.

Rosemary is highly resinous in nature, however, there are many types, some with significantly less aromatic resin than others. You still have the issue of a lack of reliable smoke generation over a period of time. If you can get your hands on some rosemary stump wood, you have a different animal altogether. You can impart a strong rosemary smoke using stump wood. However, it easily overpowers most meats and if it is not the correct rosemary, it can impart a bitter resinous flavor. Pine is an easier material to use to impart this effect. One of the issues is that rosemary has both aromatic resins and aromatic oils, the oils have the pleasant flavor. The resins are similar to pine and are not easily released using basic culinary methods, however, long direct heat can and will release these resins into the smoke.

I do like rosemary in BBQ and would not hesitate to season my board with it a' la Perry. It is also an excellent use in any method that encourages the release of the aromatic oils (not the aromatic resins) onto the food to be or in the process of being cooked. I think the better use for rosemary is as am applied flavor process and not an infused process such as smoking.

btcg
02-10-2011, 06:25 PM
Good post Bob.

I like rosemary on chicken a lot, in the manner you describe. I agree with the other brother, too, to me, it's better roasted. But that's me.

btcg
02-10-2011, 06:58 PM
I didn't mean to start an argument... that was a bonus. :laugh:

CD

I don't think anyone was arguing. I think it was a misunderstanding.

I mentioned once to a brother here that my Grandfather earned 3 Bronze Stars (the medal for bravery in battle) in WW2. Tim (Carolina) is a great guy, and an american hero who has served his country with honor. Had occasion to talk with him, and he's terriffic.

Learning a lot from this thread.

seattlepitboss
02-11-2011, 07:34 AM
I have used rosemary stalks over charcoal to add smoke to pounded marinated chicken breasts. The rosemary smoke for sure adds a dimension to the flavor. It only takes a few seconds to try it if you have a rosemary bush. And what yard shouldn't have a rosemary bush? Any foodie BBQ nut or not should grow their own herbs!

landarc
02-11-2011, 12:59 PM
Actually, we should all be growing our own herbs, especially basil, sage, rosemary, cilantro and bay. Well some of you can't have bay trees.

Q-Dat
02-11-2011, 01:40 PM
Thread.......

officially............


DERAILED..............................:tsk:


:laugh::becky::rolleyes::becky::laugh:

I guess I'll take the blame for it :D

Getting back on track though, If you had or knew someone with a pellet mill, and made some pellets out of dried rosemary or some other herb and used them in an FEC or some other pellet pooper, that might tell the truth as to the effectiveness or lack thereof.

Maybe some pellets made from a mixture of Oak and dried Rosemary, or Sage, or, Some other herb.


Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk

BobBrisket
02-11-2011, 07:38 PM
Q Talk = ON TOPIC!

Thanks,

Bob