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Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, equipment and outdoor cookin' . ** Other cooking techniques are welcomed for when your cookin' in the kitchen. Post your hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures, but stay on topic and watch for that hijacking.


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Old 09-24-2009, 12:11 PM   #16
bigabyte
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OK, good link, but who here cooks for 48 hours? If they do, then i guess the sugar may turn a light yellowish color and take on an off flavor. I'm not sure that qualifies as burnt though. My original experiment cooked just plain granulated cane sugar on a tray in an oven overnight to see if it changed. It did not have a flavor or color change. Just thought I would point that out is all. Not debunking the link, just trying to put it in proper context.
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Old 09-24-2009, 03:01 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh Jorgan View Post
Over a long period of time, at temperature of around 100 C, sugar will discolor and take on bad flavors.

http://sciencelinks.jp/j-east/articl...07A0208743.php
Thanks for the link, and it does make sense. Heat can be absorbed and incrementally increased within an object without adding higher temperatures. This is why you can fry an egg on asphalt when it is 100* F. More importantly to us here on this forum it explains why resting meat will raise the temperature 5* or better.

But I agree with Bigabyte, who smokes at 100*C (212*F) for 48 hours. Also the article said the sugar discoloured it mentioned nothing about taking on bad flavours.

I do think it is remarkable that 2 different brands of sugar demonstrated a 15*C (59*F) difference in melting points. That is quite a bit and does offer the possibility that the brand of sugar could be the greater culprit.

So let the debate continue! It is good to know that the search for the perfect Q goes on.
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Old 09-24-2009, 03:04 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigabyte View Post
It wasn't hard to come up with at all. It was there in the pantry when I was checking for more stuff to test. Actually, before that I had tried a rib rub with cherry Kool-Aid powder in it, so when i saw the packet I figured I better go ahead and put it in the test too. I heard about using the Kool-Aid while chatting with a guy who was trying to duplicate a Cherry Rub he really liked. The Kool-Aid does not duplicate the same cherry flavor as the rub he was trying to duplicate, but a cherry flavor that is not at all offensive is right there front and center!
Well that makes sense. So when do you test Gator-ade? It has the salts and the sugars! Betcha the texture would be pretty good but I couldn't even fathom the taste.

Thanks for all the research and hard work. If you decide to try the Gator-ade let me know the results.
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Old 09-24-2009, 03:12 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by RubMeTender View Post
I've spoken on this before. Paprika has a lower burning point than sugar, and actually contains quite a bit of natural sugar. Certain types of paprika will also get bitter if it's cooked too high too long.

Thanks for that info, I didn't realize that. Do you know what types of Paprika are recommended for low and slow? I imagine that Smoked Paprika would be one since it has already been exposed to some heat. But I am only guessing on that, based on my experience growing up when I was making a Chicken Cacciatore. I was sauteing the garlic and onions in olive oil and it smoked like crazy, turned an ugly black and had a very offensive smell. I realized that I had used Extra-Virgin Olive Oil and not plain Olive oil as I usually did. The final product was edible but everything had a dark burned look and and a charred taste. Won't do that again.
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Old 09-24-2009, 03:15 PM   #20
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Take a look at the ingredients I tested for a guideline. The quality of each ingredient makes a big difference. for example, using Penzeys or Szeged Sweet Hungarian Paprika had far, far better results than standard Tones Paprika.
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Old 09-24-2009, 04:26 PM   #21
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We use good quality sweet smoked paprika from a local spice trader shop. smoked sweet is pretty much hungarian paprika you buy at the grocery store, but there is a huge difference between grocery store spices and specialty shop spices. you'll only pay a bit more for it as well.
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Old 09-24-2009, 08:03 PM   #22
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I have found that the larger proportion of chili powder of any sort in my rubs, including paprika, the darker my meats get. Particularly in my ribs.
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