The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS.


Forum Portal Recipes Smoke Signals Magazine Welocme Merchandise Associations Purchase Subscription Brethren Banners
Go Back   The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS. > Discussion Area > Q-talk

Notices

Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, Equipment and just outdoor cookin' in general, hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures... but stay on topic. And watch for that hijacking.


Reply
Thread Tools
Unread 10-31-2007, 09:18 PM   #1
Meat Burner
Quintessential Chatty Farker
 
Meat Burner's Avatar
 
Join Date: 02-22-07
Location: Springfield, MO
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default Help on Small Catering

Would appreciate the Brethren advice for a benefit for a co-worker cancer victim. The company asked me to cook Butt and Brisket for about 100 people for a lunch gathering from 11:30 to 1:30. I was thinking about a pound of raw meat per person and cooking the day before. Would really appreciate some advise from the experienced Brethren about warming, quantities, moisture thoughts. Thanks for any help as this is for a wonderful lady with a big problem. Just want it to be great for her.
__________________
my avatar swiped fatties from the plate....look how sorry he is.
________
Meat.

NB Bandera with mods
Weber 22 .5" x 2, 26.75" x 1
UDS x 3
KCBS CBJ
Created "The Great Spam Revelation of 2011."
www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=111155
Meat Burner is offline   Reply With Quote


Unread 10-31-2007, 10:11 PM   #2
Yakfishingfool
Babbling Farker

 
Yakfishingfool's Avatar
 
Join Date: 10-01-05
Location: Shokan, New York
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

OK, here's what I did for pulled pork sammies...fed 125....cooked 100-110 pounds raw butts, pulled and vaccum sealed then into fridge to keep cool then freeze. If next day, then just cooling to fridge should be ok. Day of service....put in half pans with cherry juice and set in oven, covered to internal temp of 170. Then removed and placed in large coolers, covered with towels to hold temp. transported and served about 5-6 oz sammies using a cookie scoop. served beans and slaw as sides. real brownies for dessert. Turned out great!!!

Addendum: I brought the meats to 40 before going into fridge. As to safe in fridge...I am implying that I would not put into the freezer if serving the next day. Holding the meat under 40 for a day in the fridge should be adequate. sorry for the confusion. S
__________________
Oh It'z BBQ!
6 Kayaks(tarpon 160i, 2 tarpon 120's, a hobie outback, hobie tandem, and a Kaskazi Dorado)
Carolina Skiff J16 - "Calusa Wanderer"
1 Weber Gold Series Grill
1 WSM
1 Smokey Joe Platinum
1 XL Big Green Egg
KCBS Certified Judge #9079

Last edited by Yakfishingfool; 11-01-2007 at 07:53 AM..
Yakfishingfool is offline   Reply With Quote


Unread 10-31-2007, 10:27 PM   #3
big brother smoke
somebody shut me the fark up.


 
big brother smoke's Avatar
 
Join Date: 05-03-06
Location: Ventura, CA
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

Hope thats raw weight (100 pounds of each meat). This still may be more than enough. 200 lbs. of butts and brisket will be approximately 110 - 130 cooked depending on methods, cookers etc.

If you are not profitting then have at it on the weight, so you get some leftovers for later
__________________
Peace and Smoke,
BBS

https://www.bigpoppasmokers.com/stor...nufacturer=314

Powered by the West Coast Offense: Big Poppa Smokers and Simply Marvelous

"Walk with Us"
big brother smoke is online now   Reply With Quote


Unread 10-31-2007, 11:42 PM   #4
shadetreebbq
Knows what a fatty is.
 
Join Date: 07-29-07
Location: JASPER GEORGIA
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

Just the sandwiches figure 4 oz serving size.
shadetreebbq is offline   Reply With Quote


Unread 10-31-2007, 11:45 PM   #5
shadetreebbq
Knows what a fatty is.
 
Join Date: 07-29-07
Location: JASPER GEORGIA
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

You can wrap your butts at 160 with foil then cook till 200 internal save some of the juice and add it to your pulled meat it will help keep the meat moist while reheating.It works with the brisket also don't cut the brisket till ready to serve they dry out fast.
shadetreebbq is offline   Reply With Quote


Unread 10-31-2007, 11:56 PM   #6
Jeff Hughes
is one Smokin' Farker
 
Jeff Hughes's Avatar
 
Join Date: 02-03-06
Location: tulsa oklahoma
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakfishingfool View Post
OK, here's what I did for pulled pork sammies...fed 125....cooked 100-110 pounds raw butts, pulled and vaccum sealed then into fridge to cool then freeze. If next day, then just cooling to fridge should be ok.
"Should be ok" is a big phrase when you are talking about food born illness.

It's not hard to do it right, and your process is not really safe. If he does not know how to do it right, he has no business taking on the job.

I don't mean to be harsh, but BBQ is no reason to lose a guy's house.
__________________
Klose 72" Mobile
Medium BGE
HastyBake Legacy
22" Weber Kettle(10 bucks@garage sale)
Jeff Hughes is offline   Reply With Quote


Unread 11-01-2007, 12:33 AM   #7
backyardchef
Babbling Farker
 
backyardchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: 11-05-04
Location: New York City
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Hughes View Post
"Should be ok" is a big phrase when you are talking about food born illness.

It's not hard to do it right, and your process is not really safe. If he does not know how to do it right, he has no business taking on the job.

I don't mean to be harsh, but BBQ is no reason to lose a guy's house.
Jeff, you're right that people should always be careful when serving the public. Can you explain a little about how you think it should be done so the original poster has a better idea of what's involved and whether they can do it. That seems like it might be helpful, too....

A few questions for you Meat Burner-- do you have the space to safely cool and store all of that meat? That's always a possible problem with home fridges. I think you might want to bag the pulled meat in ziplocks and put the bags in an ice and water bath before you pop it all in the fridge. The next day, the meat will have to be heated to 165. Do you have access to chafers? Otherwise, holding the meat in pans on a low grill or in one of your pits may be a good idea.....
__________________
Matt
Fletcher's Brooklyn Barbecue

The Hampton Smoker Blog: http://backyardchef.blogspot.com

7' Meadow Creek reverse flow w/ a 4' grill on the nose, named Large Marge
48" Klose Backyard Chef named Wubby
Willy the Wonder Grill
Weber Kettle named Georgiette
ECB Spider Web Collector Model
Char-Griller Smokin' Pro Firebrick Supremo
backyardchef is offline   Reply With Quote


Unread 11-01-2007, 01:10 AM   #8
SoEzzy
Full Fledged Farker
 
SoEzzy's Avatar
 
Join Date: 12-02-06
Location: SLC, UT
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

If you cook it and pull it the day before, you can pack it into Ziplocs thinly. Then put onto ice/water mix and chill each bag down quickly, you can then pan it afterwards to go in the fridge over night, the point being to limit the time between, 140 F and 40 F , and cool it down as quickly as possible.

3 servings to a lb is 5.33 Oz per serving 102 servings = 34 lbs at 50% yield you'll need 68 lbs uncooked for exactly 102 servings.

Add back to the pans of meat the juice from the foiling and a cup of apple juice and lid the pans with foil, refrigerate over night, warm with the foil lids on the pans, in either the oven or your pit get the temperature up to 225 F and put the pans in, warm to over 165 F and give them at least 45 minutes with the lids on before checking them, take off the lids, check the temperature and toss the meat in the juice a little to help coat the meat with the juice.
__________________
"There is no such thing as a little garlic." A.Baer
SoEzzy is offline   Reply With Quote


Unread 11-01-2007, 07:38 AM   #9
Yakfishingfool
Babbling Farker

 
Yakfishingfool's Avatar
 
Join Date: 10-01-05
Location: Shokan, New York
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

It is definitely something to consider in handling a large quantity of meat after cooking and serving at a later time. I certainly wouldn't take it lightly. But it is something to consider to be safe. Scott
__________________
Oh It'z BBQ!
6 Kayaks(tarpon 160i, 2 tarpon 120's, a hobie outback, hobie tandem, and a Kaskazi Dorado)
Carolina Skiff J16 - "Calusa Wanderer"
1 Weber Gold Series Grill
1 WSM
1 Smokey Joe Platinum
1 XL Big Green Egg
KCBS Certified Judge #9079
Yakfishingfool is offline   Reply With Quote


Unread 11-01-2007, 07:40 AM   #10
Yakfishingfool
Babbling Farker

 
Yakfishingfool's Avatar
 
Join Date: 10-01-05
Location: Shokan, New York
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

OK, I went out to get some details....

Cooling Methods
Fact Sheet
The Food Code requires that all cooked foods not prepared for immediate service shall be cooled
as quickly as possible to eliminate the possibility of bacteria development. There are two
methods to cool potentially hazardous foods: the two-stage method (preferred) and the one-stage
method.
·
The two-stage method reduces the cooked food’s internal temperature in two steps. The
first step is to reduce the temperature from 140ºF to 70ºF within two of preparation
and

from 70ºF to 41ºF or colder within an additional four-hour period. Total cooling time
should never exceed six hours.
·
The one-stage method is designed to reduce the cooked food’s internal temperature from
140ºF to 41ºF or colder within four hours of preparation. This method should only be
used if the food is prepared from ingredients at ambient temperature, such as
reconstituted foods and canned tuna.
When deciding how best to cool potentially hazardous foods, keep in mind the following factors:

·
The size or amount of food being cooled;

·
The density of the food – a broth is less dense than a casserole; and

·
The container in which the food is being stored – shallow pans cool foods faster than
deep pans.
In order to facilitate the rapid cooling of cooked foods, the following methods are recommended
by the Food Code:

·
Placing the food to be cooled in shallow pans;

·
Separating the food to be cooled in smaller or thinner portions;

·
Using rapid cooling equipment, such as ‘blast chillers’;

·
Stirring the food to be cooled in a container placed in an ice bath;

·
Using containers that facilitate the transfer of heat;

·
Adding ice as an ingredient to the cooked food; or

·
A combination of the above methods.
The most important thing to remember about cooling foods is that the temperature of all cooked
foods should be reduced to 41ºF or colder as quickly as possible. The cooling time, however,
should never exceed the maximum time allowed for the selected method (either four hours for the
one-stage method or six hours for the two-stage method). Simply placing a cooked food item in a
refrigerator to cool may not be sufficient to reduce the threat of bacterial growth. In addition, a
warm or hot food item placed into a refrigerator may actually raise the temperature inside the unit
and jeopardize the safety of other stored foods. Once the food item has been properly cooled, it
should be stored properly – covered and labeled with the date the product was prepared. When
preparing foods using cooked ingredients, always use the older products first.

For more information about operating a food establishment,
contact your local health department.
__________________
Oh It'z BBQ!
6 Kayaks(tarpon 160i, 2 tarpon 120's, a hobie outback, hobie tandem, and a Kaskazi Dorado)
Carolina Skiff J16 - "Calusa Wanderer"
1 Weber Gold Series Grill
1 WSM
1 Smokey Joe Platinum
1 XL Big Green Egg
KCBS Certified Judge #9079
Yakfishingfool is offline   Reply With Quote


Unread 11-01-2007, 07:46 AM   #11
Yakfishingfool
Babbling Farker

 
Yakfishingfool's Avatar
 
Join Date: 10-01-05
Location: Shokan, New York
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

and from the virtual bullet site...


Holding Cooked Meat At Serving Temperature

It's 11:30am. You've just finished cooking a brisket overnight, but your guests won't be arriving until 2:00pm. The oven is off-limits because it will be used to cook other food. What will you do?
According to the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), meat must be held above 140° in order to be safe. You can hold cooked meat above this temperature for 2-4 hours or longer by using an ice chest. Just follow these steps:
  • Insert a Polder probe thermometer into the meat so the internal temperature can be monitored from outside the ice chest.
  • Wrap the meat tightly in wide, heavy-duty aluminum foil.
  • Place a thick layer of dry towels or crumpled newspaper in the bottom of the ice chest as insulation between the meat and the interior. Ice chests have been known to crack during contact with a hot brisket or pork butt.
  • Place the meat into the ice chest.
  • Cover with additional towels or newspaper for insulation (optional).
  • Close the lid and monitor the meat temp to ensure it stays over 140°F.
To keep meat warm even longer, preheat the ice chest first. Here are several ideas on how to do this:
  • Pour a gallon of hot tap water into the ice chest. Close the lid and slosh the water around. Allow the water to heat the interior for several minutes, then discard the water and dry thoroughly.
  • Wrap several fireplace bricks in heavy duty aluminum foil. Heat in a 500°F oven for 30 minutes. Place a thick layer of dry towels in the bottom of the ice chest, then add the hot bricks, then a thin layer of moist towels. This method was described by Alton Brown on an episode of "Good Eats."
  • Place an electric heating pad inside the ice chest. This method was described by Big Al in a post on The Virtual Weber Bulletin Board.
  • Turn the ice chest upside down over a heater vent. This method was described by Keri C. in a post on The Virtual Weber Bulletin Board.
The length of time you can hold meat above 140°F depends on:
  • Whether the ice chest is preheated or not.
  • The volume of meat and how hot it is going into the ice chest.
  • Whether insulation is placed on top of the meat or not.
  • The efficiency of the ice chest.
  • How often the ice chest is opened.
As noted in the Brisket - Midnight Cook topic, I held a brisket above 140°F for 3 hours and 15 minutes using this method--but without preheating the ice chest or placing additional insulation over the meat.
Does Barbecue Stand Up To Storage And Reheating?

Some foods just seem to taste better after being refrigerated and reheated, while other foods don't. Whether barbecue belongs in the former or latter category is a matter of personal opinion and probably varies from meat to meat. Here's my take on the "big four" barbecue meats:
  • Brisket tastes great as leftovers, but the "bark" gets soft during storage and reheating, so enjoy the bark when the meat is freshly cooked. Brisket refrigerates and freezes well, but you have to take care to not dry it out during reheating.
  • Pork butt performs much like brisket. It tastes great as leftovers and it refrigerates, freezes, and reheats very well. "Mr. Brown" (the chewy exterior meat) will soften during storage and reheating. The fat content of pork butt helps keep it moist during reheating.
  • Pork ribs are best enjoyed right out of the smoker. I refrigerate and reheat ribs, but never enjoy them as much as the first time around. I don't freeze ribs, but some people do and say they reheat just fine.
  • Chicken is another meat that's best fresh from the smoker. The meat itself sometimes tastes better after refrigerating and reheating, but the skin softens up and really suffers. As with ribs, I don't freeze chicken, but some people do and say it freezes and reheats quite well.
The bottom line is that most barbecued meats can be refrigerated, frozen, and reheated with success.
__________________
Oh It'z BBQ!
6 Kayaks(tarpon 160i, 2 tarpon 120's, a hobie outback, hobie tandem, and a Kaskazi Dorado)
Carolina Skiff J16 - "Calusa Wanderer"
1 Weber Gold Series Grill
1 WSM
1 Smokey Joe Platinum
1 XL Big Green Egg
KCBS Certified Judge #9079
Yakfishingfool is offline   Reply With Quote


Unread 11-01-2007, 07:49 AM   #12
Yakfishingfool
Babbling Farker

 
Yakfishingfool's Avatar
 
Join Date: 10-01-05
Location: Shokan, New York
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

One thing I don't see is that I believe in reheating, bringing the temp of the food to 165 degree's for 16 seconds will kill most food borne organisms that cause problems. I brought mine to 165-70 and then into pre heated coolers and was able to maintain a temp in the 150's for a couple of hours easily until served. Scott
__________________
Oh It'z BBQ!
6 Kayaks(tarpon 160i, 2 tarpon 120's, a hobie outback, hobie tandem, and a Kaskazi Dorado)
Carolina Skiff J16 - "Calusa Wanderer"
1 Weber Gold Series Grill
1 WSM
1 Smokey Joe Platinum
1 XL Big Green Egg
KCBS Certified Judge #9079
Yakfishingfool is offline   Reply With Quote


Unread 11-01-2007, 04:27 PM   #13
Meat Burner
Quintessential Chatty Farker
 
Meat Burner's Avatar
 
Join Date: 02-22-07
Location: Springfield, MO
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

Thanks for all the help here. Fortunately, I do have plenty of room to cool the meat quick, vacumn seal, and refrig space. My work has several chafers I will use for serving but will keep them on the smokers for reheating and then bring in as needed. I certainly will be careful and do appreciate your comments and sharing suggestions.
__________________
my avatar swiped fatties from the plate....look how sorry he is.
________
Meat.

NB Bandera with mods
Weber 22 .5" x 2, 26.75" x 1
UDS x 3
KCBS CBJ
Created "The Great Spam Revelation of 2011."
www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=111155
Meat Burner is offline   Reply With Quote


Unread 11-02-2007, 01:12 AM   #14
thenewguy
Full Fledged Farker
 
thenewguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: 10-23-07
Location: Norwalk,Iowa
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

Instead of using ice to cool down, would it be acceptable to set in a freezer to cool down rapidly?
thenewguy is offline   Reply With Quote


Unread 11-02-2007, 09:54 AM   #15
backyardchef
Babbling Farker
 
backyardchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: 11-05-04
Location: New York City
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thenewguy View Post
Instead of using ice to cool down, would it be acceptable to set in a freezer to cool down rapidly?
I wouldn't try that with a residential model. It could work, in theory, but it could also put too much demand on the compressor and may not efficiently cool the meat, which means that at the core it could be at the danger zone too long while the outside is getting frozen. In restaurants they have blast chillers for this purpose, but they're much more powerful than a home freezer. The ice bath helps cool the meat to a low enough temp that the fridge or the freezer doesn't have to work overtime.

Also, putting something piping hot in the fridge (not the freezer, neccesarily) can put other items near by it at risk of being compromised by raising their temps....
__________________
Matt
Fletcher's Brooklyn Barbecue

The Hampton Smoker Blog: http://backyardchef.blogspot.com

7' Meadow Creek reverse flow w/ a 4' grill on the nose, named Large Marge
48" Klose Backyard Chef named Wubby
Willy the Wonder Grill
Weber Kettle named Georgiette
ECB Spider Web Collector Model
Char-Griller Smokin' Pro Firebrick Supremo
backyardchef is offline   Reply With Quote


Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Starting up Small Catering gig - Cooker advice Smokin' Frenchman Catering, Vending and Cooking For The Masses. 30 02-23-2010 11:38 AM
small catering job nightmare grillfella Catering, Food Handling and Awareness 16 06-24-2009 02:51 AM
Small birthday Party Catering Don Marco Q-talk 17 07-13-2008 02:36 AM
Small catering gig today. Pics for y'all... Hawgsnheifers Q-talk 22 04-02-2007 10:21 PM
Small time catering chad Q-talk 32 01-13-2007 10:14 AM

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Loading



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise v2.6.0 Beta 4 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
2003 -2012 © BBQ-Brethren Inc. All rights reserved. All Content and Flaming Pig Logo are registered and protected under U.S and International Copyright and Trademarks. Content Within this Website Is Property of BBQ Brethren Inc. Reproduction or alteration is strictly prohibited.
no new posts