oink
The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS.


Recipes Smoke Signals Magazine Welocme Merchandise Associations Purchase Subscription Brethren Banners
Go Back   The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS. > Discussion Area > Q-talk

Notices

Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, Equipment and just outdoor cookin' in general, hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures... but stay on topic. And watch for that hijacking.


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-05-2013, 08:53 AM   #16
The_Kapn
Moderator Emeritus

 
The_Kapn's Avatar
 
Join Date: 04-08-04
Location: Marianna, FL
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by caliking View Post
I may be wrong, but if you use canned juice, I don't know if you still get the tenderizer action. The enzymes may beinactivated by the heat f the canning/pasteurization process. I think the tenderizing action only comes from using raw pineapple or its juice.
What he said!

Also, there are folks on the WWW that will declare that their way is the only way.
If that were true, there would never have been any progress in BBQ.
Improvements come from folks who are open minded and willing to experiment, even when others blast their ideas.

So--go ahead and try it if you wish.

I would be interested to see the results.

TIM
__________________
"Flirtin' with Disaster" BBQ Team (RETIRED)
FBA and KCBS Cook and Judge.
Former owner of a WSM, a Smokey Joe, a Charbroil Commercial gasser (junk), the legendary "StudeDera", a FEC100, a Fast Eddy PG500, and Sherman the Wonder Trailer.
Now cooking with a Yoder YS640
Proud Pellet guy cooking on real wood.
The_Kapn is online now   Reply With Quote


Old 01-05-2013, 10:29 AM   #17
j20832
On the road to being a farker
 
Join Date: 06-30-10
Location: Olney, MD
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wampus View Post
The only experimenting with pineapple juice I've done was on NYE a few days ago when I mixed with ice and Malibu Rum and drank it. It sure was GOOD but I don't think it did anything to tenderize my meat.
I believe that is called a "poor man's pina-colada" (seriously, not making that up or trying to be humorous).

With regards to the brisket experiment, people use pineapple a lot of the time making teriyaki beef dishes, so why not brisket? My only concern would be the same as injecting with a papain tenderizer (which has been brought up before) and that is, you don't want to end up with mush. Maybe in a hot and fast application to lessen the time for the enzymes to work? As has been said, go for it and please report back afterwards, it's your meal and your money, so give it a shot!
__________________
Brinkmann SnP, Weber Kettle, 30" Masterbuilt Electric, lonely gasser, Red Thermapen
j20832 is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 01-05-2013, 09:58 PM   #18
Ole Man Dan
is one Smokin' Farker
 
Join Date: 07-24-11
Location: Gadsden, Alabama
Default

My partner is from Hawaii and he uses lots of pineapple.
He uses it in all kinds of pork smokes, some Chicken too.
I've never had it in Beef, just in Butts and Hams.
Kind of an Islander taste. Different, but good.

I second the idea of mixing Pineapple, Coconut milk, and '151'. Very good.
(Ya gotta do something while the meat's smoking)
Ole Man Dan is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 01-05-2013, 11:18 PM   #19
martyleach
Babbling Farker

 
martyleach's Avatar
 
Join Date: 12-17-10
Location: Pleasanton, Ca
Default

You could also simply use a diluted mixture of Bromelain, which is the enzyme in the pineapple that causes the tenderizing. It is quite available online and is used in many of the available meat tenderizers you would get at the grocery store. This way you don't get the pineapple flavor...

I would try injecting immediately before smoking. For more information on Bromelain see below.

bromelain, a natural mixture of two proteases (protein-digesting enzymes) found in pineapples. They discovered that bromelain is quite effective at dividing proteins such as the collagen in meat.
Although bromelain is found in every part of the pineapple, it's most plentiful in the stem. Most commercially grown pineapple is sliced, canned or juiced. The remains are rich with this corrosive substance, which is then extracted.
Bromelain works in these capacities due to its ability to separate amino acids. Amino acids are organic compounds within living cells. Amino acids join by forming peptide bonds, a link that connects one amino acid's amino group with the carboxyl group of another amino acid. When amino acids join through peptide bonds, they form proteins. These proteins then carry out numerous functions in the structure and operation of cells, tissues and organs.
The compound separates the all-important peptide bonds that link the proteins in collagen. Since the collagen gives the muscle tissue its shape, once it's broken down, the muscle tissue begins losing firmness. If you left meat for a day or two covered with bromelain, it would be noticeably mushy, so much so that you wouldn't want to eat it. When used shortly before cooking, however, bromelain efficiently softens the steak for chewing, but leaves it firm enough to enjoy its taste. The enzymes are neutralized by heat of about 158 degrees Fahrenheit (70 degrees Celsius), so they stop working once cooked.
__________________
Large BGE, Cold smokehouse, Kamado Joe Jr,
Santa Maria pit, Backwoods Chubby,
26.75" Weber OTG, Weber Performer, WGA
MAK One Star, Smokey Joe, Jumbo Joe Gold, Custom wooden handles for BBQ's made by Marty Leach (oh, that's me)

www.amlwoodart.com
martyleach is offline   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


Forum Custom Search: Enter your Search text below. GOOGLE will search ONLY the BBQ Brethren Forum. If it doesnt find results at first, hit search a few times more.





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
2003 -2012 © BBQ-Brethren Inc. All rights reserved. All Content and Flaming Pig Logo are registered and protected under U.S and International Copyright and Trademarks. Content Within this Website Is Property of BBQ Brethren Inc. Reproduction or alteration is strictly prohibited.