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Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, equipment and outdoor cookin' . ** Other cooking techniques are welcomed for when your cookin' in the kitchen. Post your hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures, but stay on topic and watch for that hijacking.


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Old 04-14-2011, 04:12 PM   #16
Mark
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PS: From Wikipedia

Cement board

Water resistance


The category of construction material known as cement board includes both water resistant and waterproof board. Each has its own best use.

Typically water resistant cement board is composed of a treated gypsum core with a non organic fiber reinforced covering, either on one or both faces. This type of board requires fastidious sealing of all cut edges and penetrations to maintain the manufacturer's warranty for wet area installations. Gypsum core "cement" board panels are ideal for moist but not truly wet installations of tile and/or stone walls.

There is a class of cement board strictly constructed of a Portland cement based core with glass fiber matt reinforcing at both faces. This type board is truly waterproof. These panels can be immersed in water without any degradation (excluding freeze thaw cycles). These panels do not require the sealing of edges and penetrations to maintain their structural integrity. These Portland cement based products are smaller in size compared with the gypsum core based products. Typically they range in size from 30" x 48" to 36" x 60". They are, as one would expect, considerably heavier than the gypsum core type panels.

Portland cement based panels are ideal for truly wet locations like shower surrounds and for locations where a Portland cement based thin-set material is used for bonding tile and stone surfaces to a substrate. They are also ideal for floor tile and stone installations over a structural subfloor.
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Old 04-14-2011, 04:22 PM   #17
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Yours looks like our deck, lol.

You win, lucky for me my daughter seen my deck fire otherwise it could've been worse
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Old 04-14-2011, 04:28 PM   #18
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I actually had this question a few weeks ago. To me the issue is heat, not from the smoker, but from the summer sun. Any metal you put down will absord a lot of heat. Several people said tile would have the same issue.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=102967
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Old 04-14-2011, 08:36 PM   #19
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I actually had this question a few weeks ago. To me the issue is heat, not from the smoker, but from the summer sun. Any metal you put down will absord a lot of heat. Several people said tile would have the same issue.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=102967
Your right about the sun, my temp was running fine and then the sun came around the house and beemed on my cooker, temp jumped 100 F
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Old 04-14-2011, 08:57 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Mark View Post
PS: From Wikipedia

Cement board

Water resistance


The category of construction material known as cement board includes both water resistant and waterproof board. Each has its own best use.

Typically water resistant cement board is composed of a treated gypsum core with a non organic fiber reinforced covering, either on one or both faces. This type of board requires fastidious sealing of all cut edges and penetrations to maintain the manufacturer's warranty for wet area installations. Gypsum core "cement" board panels are ideal for moist but not truly wet installations of tile and/or stone walls.

There is a class of cement board strictly constructed of a Portland cement based core with glass fiber matt reinforcing at both faces. This type board is truly waterproof. These panels can be immersed in water without any degradation (excluding freeze thaw cycles). These panels do not require the sealing of edges and penetrations to maintain their structural integrity. These Portland cement based products are smaller in size compared with the gypsum core based products. Typically they range in size from 30" x 48" to 36" x 60". They are, as one would expect, considerably heavier than the gypsum core type panels.

Portland cement based panels are ideal for truly wet locations like shower surrounds and for locations where a Portland cement based thin-set material is used for bonding tile and stone surfaces to a substrate. They are also ideal for floor tile and stone installations over a structural subfloor.
Densglass is what you're referring to. Good stuff.
http://www.gp.com/build/product.aspx?pid=4674

Air will be your best friend, because it will instantly dissipate the heat. Instead of lifting it on fire bricks, I wonder if lifting it up on rubber wheel castor's would be better. My thinking is that the bricks will just absorb the heat from the drum and eventually heat up to the same temp as the drum and then transmit that heat to the deck. But, if you bolt on some big wheels that you get at harbor freight, they won't hold the heat like the bricks and will radiate off the heat quicker. You should be able to get 4" high wheel. That should work well. But the higher the better.

I use two of these fixed wheels, and then a 3/4" bolt for the third leg (so it can't move without being lifted, but it is a little wobbly)
http://www.harborfreight.com/3-inch-...ter-96407.html


Here is a 5" swivel, just find a way to keep it from moving on you.:
http://www.harborfreight.com/5-inch-...ter-38711.html

With wheels like that, I would feel safe with a grill mat under it... but of course, I have no clue about how much extra protection you need from a drunk roommate.
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