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Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, equipment and outdoor cookin' . ** Other cooking techniques are welcomed for when your cookin' in the kitchen. Post your hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures, but stay on topic and watch for that hijacking.


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Old 08-25-2019, 02:29 PM   #31
ulc
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Thanks all! What I love about ribs is it reheats extremely well in the microwave compared to something like brisket which needs to be reheated via sous vide to prevent drying out. We have good bit of leftovers which we'll eat today.

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Originally Posted by charcoalwilly View Post
One of the most educational posts I’ve come across here! Many thanks. Can you share your galbi marinade recipe?
Sure. My wife makes the marinade and it's little different every time as she often adds other ingredients depending on mood. But she uses this as the base marinade. This recipe makes big batch and should be good for more than 10 lbs of meat. What we do is make big batch of marinade and freeze what we don't use so we can have some in stock when mood strikes.

Korean galbi marinade base

Soy sauce 2 cup
White sugar 1 cup
Rice cooking wine 1 cup
Water 2 cup
Minced garlic 1/2 cup
Minced ginger 1/2 tablespoon
Sesame oil 1/3 cup
Black pepper 1 tablespoon
Onion purée; 1 onion
Pear purée; 2 pears
Korean plum extract; 2 tablespoon

You can use a blender to mix everything. Add more soy sauce or sugar/honey/Korean plum extract if marinade taste is too sweet or salty and adjust to taste.

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Originally Posted by Eckie View Post
The perilla...do you buy the leaves or grow it? Wondering what the plant looks like? We have whats called perilla mint on the farm, not sure if it's the same thing. Not good for cows if they eat it, causes respiratory distress and possibly death if they consume enough. We got dry hear the other week, and a farmer in neighboring county lost at least 7 cows from eating perilla. Ive tried looking it up to see if its the same thing before but couldnt really tell.
We grow it. We've been enjoying and eating the leaves all summer so the plants don't have any big leaves left. These are Korean perilla. It's different from Japanese variety even though it may look similar.



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Old 08-25-2019, 02:40 PM   #32
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Heck yes!
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Old 08-25-2019, 03:28 PM   #33
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That looks amazing!! lots of love and attention put into that meal and it shows
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Old 08-25-2019, 03:44 PM   #34
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The perilla we have in the fields is a bit more branchy than that, not as straight. Also tends to have a bit of a darker color on some of the plant. Wish it was something edible and in demand! Thanks for posting the pic
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Old 08-27-2019, 04:41 AM   #35
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Awesome thread. I love Kalbi. Dad was stationed in Korea a couple of times and he introduced me to it and Bulgogi. I'm a picky eater, mostly just meat, so when I go to Korean restaurants, I pass on all the side dishes and just eat meat and rice. When I ran up a bill of $70+ eating Kalbi and Bulgogi one Tuesday at a local Korean restaurant, I decided that I needed to learn how to make both at home.

Thanks for posting the marinade recipe. The one I came up with is similar, but you listed some ingredients that I'll have to try.
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Old 08-27-2019, 09:42 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Demosthenes9 View Post
Awesome thread. I love Kalbi. Dad was stationed in Korea a couple of times and he introduced me to it and Bulgogi. I'm a picky eater, mostly just meat, so when I go to Korean restaurants, I pass on all the side dishes and just eat meat and rice. When I ran up a bill of $70+ eating Kalbi and Bulgogi one Tuesday at a local Korean restaurant, I decided that I needed to learn how to make both at home.

Thanks for posting the marinade recipe. The one I came up with is similar, but you listed some ingredients that I'll have to try.
I'm not a big Bulgogi person. I eat it but I don't love it. The marinade for Bulgogi and Galbi are very similar with bulgogi usually little sweeter. Bulgogi used to be grilled but now most people just cook it in a pan on the stove. I rather eat galbi. And the galbi I prefer is not the marinated kind I made here but plain version with no marinade. But marinated galbi is great too, just not as good as plain IMO. But in order for the plain version to work, you have to grill at table side and eat it right off the grill while it's hot. If you grill outside in big batch and bring it inside to eat, the plain galbi won't be as good since the meat will have cooled and dried out. The marinated ones don't suffer from this problem so it's better for outside grilling.

Most marinade recipe for galbi will have green onions. We tend to leave it out as I find the green onions tend to burn on the grill. We tried blending the green onions in a mixer but it has that slimy sticky feel when blended that I don't like. If I add green onions to the marinade, I just cut in large pieces and take it out of the marinade before I grill.
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Old 08-27-2019, 03:20 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ulc View Post
I'm not a big Bulgogi person. I eat it but I don't love it. The marinade for Bulgogi and Galbi are very similar with bulgogi usually little sweeter. Bulgogi used to be grilled but now most people just cook it in a pan on the stove. I rather eat galbi. And the galbi I prefer is not the marinated kind I made here but plain version with no marinade. But marinated galbi is great too, just not as good as plain IMO. But in order for the plain version to work, you have to grill at table side and eat it right off the grill while it's hot. If you grill outside in big batch and bring it inside to eat, the plain galbi won't be as good since the meat will have cooled and dried out. The marinated ones don't suffer from this problem so it's better for outside grilling.

Most marinade recipe for galbi will have green onions. We tend to leave it out as I find the green onions tend to burn on the grill. We tried blending the green onions in a mixer but it has that slimy sticky feel when blended that I don't like. If I add green onions to the marinade, I just cut in large pieces and take it out of the marinade before I grill.

I kind of cheat and use the same marinade for Kalbi and Bulgogi. Basically, the difference to me is only in the cut of meat. Sacrilege? Perhaps, but I don't know enough about it to know the difference.


I like to do bulgogi over coals on my Weber (added crossed grate) when possible, but I often do it in a pan right at the table. My setup looks similar to this one




I sit down at the dinner table with the butane stove and that "Korean BBQ pan", a huge mixing bowl with 3 or 4 lbs of marinated meat in it, my Zoji rice cooker, some tongs and whatever accompaniments others might want, like seaweed squares, leaf lettuce, gochujang, cabbage kimchi, or whatever else.

After that, it's a free for all of sorts. Anyone can grab pieces of raw meat from the bowl and put it on the pan to cook. Each piece is kind of cooked to order. When a piece of meat is ready, grab it off the pan, add whatever you want and eat. While chewing, throw more meat in the pan.

This works for both Kalbi and Bulgogi. Bulgogi is what we usually do simply out of cheapness as top round or eye of round is often $3 per lb. Ribs around here are $6 to $8 per lb. Factoring in the amount of bone, top/eye of round is much more cost effective. It's the same when we go out to a Korean restaurant. We'll load up on 4 or 5 orders of bulgogi with 1 or 2 orders of Kalbi


Yeah, it's cheating. Definitely "Americanized" or "cheaped out" so to speak, but it works for me.
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Old 08-27-2019, 03:23 PM   #38
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BTW, brilliant call on simply using a hacksaw to cut those rib plates down. I never thought of that. I had considered buying an electric meat saw off of FB Marketplace to do my own. A danged hacksaw is a much simpler solution.
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Old 08-27-2019, 04:02 PM   #39
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I guess I misplaced my invitation to this dinner.

Looks fantastic!
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Old 08-27-2019, 05:03 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Demosthenes9 View Post
I kind of cheat and use the same marinade for Kalbi and Bulgogi. Basically, the difference to me is only in the cut of meat. Sacrilege? Perhaps, but I don't know enough about it to know the difference.


I like to do bulgogi over coals on my Weber (added crossed grate) when possible, but I often do it in a pan right at the table. My setup looks similar to this one




I sit down at the dinner table with the butane stove and that "Korean BBQ pan", a huge mixing bowl with 3 or 4 lbs of marinated meat in it, my Zoji rice cooker, some tongs and whatever accompaniments others might want, like seaweed squares, leaf lettuce, gochujang, cabbage kimchi, or whatever else.

After that, it's a free for all of sorts. Anyone can grab pieces of raw meat from the bowl and put it on the pan to cook. Each piece is kind of cooked to order. When a piece of meat is ready, grab it off the pan, add whatever you want and eat. While chewing, throw more meat in the pan.

This works for both Kalbi and Bulgogi. Bulgogi is what we usually do simply out of cheapness as top round or eye of round is often $3 per lb. Ribs around here are $6 to $8 per lb. Factoring in the amount of bone, top/eye of round is much more cost effective. It's the same when we go out to a Korean restaurant. We'll load up on 4 or 5 orders of bulgogi with 1 or 2 orders of Kalbi


Yeah, it's cheating. Definitely "Americanized" or "cheaped out" so to speak, but it works for me.
You're doing it right! I do lot of indoor tabletop cooking as well. Especially in the winter. I have two tabletop electric grills and one butane stove with dome lid setup just like in your picture. I also have Weber Smokey Joe, Weber Go Anywhere, and Lodge Hibachi grill I use for camping and outdoor tabletop cooking. Cooking indoors do create bit of smoke but we just open the windows and cook away at the table. It's just fun way to eat and everyone at the table interacts with each other.

Like I mentioned, I prefer grilling unseasoned meats when cooking table side. Here's me cooking samgyeopsal (grilled pork belly).
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=265607

Here's another thread of me grilling chadolbagi (grilled beef brisket) and boneless galbi.
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=257515

Pork belly, beef brisket, and short ribs were all grilled naked with zero seasoning. Not even salt and pepper. I use various dipping sauces with the cooked meat as I eat it. This way I can have different flavor profile with every bite instead of just having one taste of the marinade.
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Old 08-27-2019, 05:19 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ulc View Post
You're doing it right! I do lot of indoor tabletop cooking as well. Especially in the winter. I have two tabletop electric grills and one butane stove with dome lid setup just like in your picture. I also have Weber Smokey Joe, Weber Go Anywhere, and Lodge Hibachi grill I use for camping and outdoor tabletop cooking. Cooking indoors do create bit of smoke but we just open the windows and cook away at the table. It's just fun way to eat and everyone at the table interacts with each other.

Like I mentioned, I prefer grilling unseasoned meats when cooking table side. Here's me cooking samgyeopsal (grilled pork belly).
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=265607

Here's another thread of me grilling chadolbagi (grilled beef brisket) and boneless galbi.
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=257515

Pork belly, beef brisket, and short ribs were all grilled naked with zero seasoning. Not even salt and pepper. I use various dipping sauces with the cooked meat as I eat it. This way I can have different flavor profile with every bite instead of just having one taste of the marinade.


Thanks for the links! I'll have to give some of those a try. And yeah, cooking at the table is awesome. Meat right off the grill and as you said, the interactive aspect of it is great. Its funny when someone new to it is kind of reserved at the start. They just want to sit back and let me or someone else put the meat on, tend to it, hand it to them when it's ready. Then, as the night goes on, they start getting adventurous and will grab cooked meat off the pan. Next thing you know, they are diving in the raw bowl and doing it all themselves.
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