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Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, equipment and outdoor cookin' . ** Other cooking techniques are welcomed for when your cookin' in the kitchen. Post your hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures, but stay on topic and watch for that hijacking.


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Old 06-17-2019, 11:25 PM   #16
SlowmotionQue
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Originally Posted by SonnyE View Post
The one that was FUBARed by a previous turd.
And I've had better luck with Vice Grips because they can hold better. Until I have to drill and use an appropriate Easy-Out, left handed drill bit, Drill and tap to remove the trashed bolt, or repair it with a Helicoil. Short of resorting to welding to repair the part.
My Channel Locks are used for conduits and pipes.

My point is, and was, you are berating others and using an uncalibrated tool as your reference.

Of course if you are drinking Scotch, that would explain a whole lot of your attitude. I'd sooner drink Paint Thinner than Scotch.
And if it wasn't FUBARed, but in perfect condition and you could get a wrench on it vs a pair of pliers or Grips?

You are confusing "berating" with "poking fun at". Lighten up. I actually own a pellet grill, just like I own Channel Locks and Vise Grips. And use my pellet grill around 5 times per week. I know it's limitations.

What would you have me "calibrate" by laser tool against? A blast furnace? If it's practical, well then I'll do it.

When I first started playing golf years ago, I used to play the entire course with a driver, an iron of my choosing for that particular day, and a putter, because no one ever told me that the other clubs had a use for specific circumstances and distances.

I used to play 150yd par threes by choking down on that driver.

Had a buddy who would "play a slice". Aligned himself way far left and would hit the ball from about a 10 or 11 o'clock position, depending upon how wide the fairway was, hit the ball and let it "slice" it's way onto the fairway.

One day he drove the ball smack dab into a tree to his left, the tree being in the way before the ball had a chance to break and slice right.

I laughed my ass off. I tried to hold it.... didn't want to laugh. Got all the way back to the cart so that we could look for the ball that struck that big oak tree dead solid...... Didn't want to "berate" him.......but after a few seconds, well, after giving it my all, I lost it. I laughed. But it was "with" him, not at him. It wasn't mean spirited or "snarky". None of that.

I look back on those days now and laugh. Laugh at myself. Laugh at him. But back then, I didn't know any better. Neither of us did.

Were you to rib me about that now, I would hardly look at it as "berating".
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Old 06-17-2019, 11:46 PM   #17
SlowmotionQue
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991* is another level. I’m no pellet guy but we’ve got several pellet guys here who have turned out some excellent cooks complete with good sear on their pooper. Guess they did it with something shy of 991*. In any case, I bet your steak was good.
It was, for what it was. An impromptu snack from a pack of 3 such steaks after seasoning my grates, and griddles yesterday.
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Old 06-17-2019, 11:51 PM   #18
SlowmotionQue
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I cooked a tbone in cast iron on the stove Saturday that looked almost exactly like yours as far as coverage goes. If you put enough fat (butter, oil) into the pan to maintain contact with protein you can often work around an inconsistent surface due to curvature or a bone. But once you lose that contact or let water build up between the metal and meat surfaces, its hard to overcome.

I'm not saying my way is THE right way, but I have found some methods that work for me.
This was olive oil, but I do get what you're saying and thanks for the tip.
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Old 06-18-2019, 12:04 AM   #19
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And if it wasn't FUBARed, but in perfect condition and you could get a wrench on it vs a pair of pliers or Grips?

You are confusing "berating" with "poking fun at". Lighten up. I actually own a pellet grill, just like I own Channel Locks and Vise Grips.

What would you have me "calibrate" it against? A blast furnace?

When I first started playing golf years ago, I used to play the entire course with a driver, an iron of my choosing for that particular day, and a putter, because no one ever told me that the other clubs had a use for specific circumstances and distances.

I used to play 150yd par threes by choking down on that driver.

Had a buddy who would "play a slice". Aligned himself way far left and would hit the ball from about a 10 or 11 o'clock position, depending upon how wide the fairway was, hit the ball and let it "slice" it's way onto the fairway.

One day he drove the ball smack dab into a tree to his left, the tree being in the way before the ball had a chance to break and slice right.

I laughed my ass off. I tried to hold it.... didn't want to laugh. Got all the way back to the cart so that we could look for the ball that struck that big oak tree dead solid...... Didn't want to "berate" him.......but after a few seconds, well, after giving it my all, I lost it. I laughed. But it was "with" him, not at him. It wasn't mean spirited or "snarky". None of that.

I look back on those days now and laugh. Laugh at myself. Laugh at him. But back then, I didn't know any better. Neither of us did.

Were you to rib me about that now, I would hardly look at it as "berating".
You Sir are full of bananas.
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Old 06-18-2019, 12:10 AM   #20
SlowmotionQue
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You Sir are full of bananas.
Perhaps

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...To what did you calibrate your Infrared? And who's to say it is accurate at all?
What would you have me calibrate it against? The sun?

Better yet, what temperature do you think that fully lit lump charcoal can reach?

Here you go:

https://www.finecooking.com/article/...uette-charcoal

"......Lump charcoal burns hotter than briquettes. A briquette fire can get up to 800 to 1000 degrees, while lump can get up to 1400° F."

https://betterhomesteading.com/homes...lump-charcoal/

'.....At best, a briquette fire can go up to a maximum of about 1000 degrees F. Lump charcoal can go to temperatures as high as 1400 degrees F."

That was fully lit and stoked Royal Oak Lump as stated in the first post. As far as charcoal goes, it is all that I use. In this case, I was using about 1.5 plus Kingsford Chimneyfulls of it. Closer to 2 full chimneys. Inside of a ceramic Kamado, with the bottom and top vents wide open until the dome temperature had just reached 800°F.

What, are you doubting the dome temperature now too?

And yet you're somehow doubting that a piece of solid cast iron sitting over top of that fully stoked lump charcoal, capable of burning at up to 1400°F, in a ceramic Kamado, arguably the best vehicle for burning lump charcoal in if we're talking about cooking with it, that this piece of cast iron can't reach 991°F?

It's looking like I'm not the one full of bananas.

Oh, and BTW, cast iron is said to melt at 2100°F-2190°F. I'm well short of that.
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Old 06-18-2019, 05:51 AM   #21
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[QUOTE
Of course if you are drinking Scotch, that would explain a whole lot of your attitude. I'd sooner drink Paint Thinner than Scotch. [/QUOTE]

i bet that would result in a helluva buzz... while it lasted
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Old 06-18-2019, 07:10 AM   #22
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I think your IR may be broken cause I sear steaks that look like that waaaaay below 991°
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Old 06-18-2019, 07:30 AM   #23
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The IR reading is likely fine. I have checked mine with a high temp thermocouple and my Kamado can easily exceed 1000 F.

I agree with the general premise of right tool for the job, and that a pellet grill is not the best tool for searing, but you lost me with the cast iron grates and the picture of an uneven/incomplete sear.

The right tool for the job is the thinnest practical grate set close to the coals. You want to maximize the surface of the meat exposed to hot air, IR, and flame. If your heat source isn’t hot enough, cast iron pans and griddles are a great crutch that can absorb heat over time and then rapidly transfer it to your steak, but their place is not on a Kamado. Wrong tool or combination of tools for the job.

And yes, you can get a good sear at 450, 650, 850, or 1050, but they aren’t all the same. At lower temps, the sear takes longer and the amount of internal meat impacted is higher. A piece of preheated cast iron or carbon steel can speed up the heat transfer and offset that some, but it is still a different kind of sear than you get with a super hot charcoal fire or a salamander.
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Old 06-18-2019, 08:43 AM   #24
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The IR reading is likely fine. I have checked mine with a high temp thermocouple and my Kamado can easily exceed 1000 F.

I agree with the general premise of right tool for the job, and that a pellet grill is not the best tool for searing, but you lost me with the cast iron grates and the picture of an uneven/incomplete sear.

The right tool for the job is the thinnest practical grate set close to the coals. You want to maximize the surface of the meat exposed to hot air, IR, and flame. If your heat source isn’t hot enough, cast iron pans and griddles are a great crutch that can absorb heat over time and then rapidly transfer it to your steak, but their place is not on a Kamado. Wrong tool or combination of tools for the job.

And yes, you can get a good sear at 450, 650, 850, or 1050, but they aren’t all the same. At lower temps, the sear takes longer and the amount of internal meat impacted is higher. A piece of preheated cast iron or carbon steel can speed up the heat transfer and offset that some, but it is still a different kind of sear than you get with a super hot charcoal fire or a salamander.

I agree and could have used my grates, cast iron or stainless steel, and at a lower level and have done so on occasion. Many Kamado owners, myself included, have successfully used cast iron on them. So I respectfully disagree that cast iron has no place on a Kamado.

Could have done a reverse sear, could have used my Sous vide. Could have done a few things differently

This was literally a $7.00 steak. Three in a pack, 21.00 and some change I think I paid. It was already dark and I was mainly just putzing. This steak was not my best effort, I bought it maybe a half hour before putting it on and after seasoning my grates and griddle and decided to take pics of my new Father’s Day gift in use.

The point of the pics was to show how hot a well heated cooker such as a Kamado, using lump charcoal can get for searing purposes, vs most pellet grills in the $2,000.00 and less range can.
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Old 06-18-2019, 09:06 AM   #25
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The point of the pics was to show how hot a well heated cooker such as a Kamado, using lump charcoal can get for searing purposes, vs most pellet grills in the $2,000.00 and less range can.
I don't really ever see anyone making that argument though...
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Old 06-18-2019, 09:13 AM   #26
SlowmotionQue
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I don't really ever see anyone making that argument though...
It’s out there in one form or another.

The most common form that it exists in is the position, usually sales related, that one cooker, namely the latest and greatest pellet cookers, can do it all and do it all well.

I love pellet cookers. Own one. But I cringe every time one of these manufacturers touts their searing capabilities.
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Old 06-18-2019, 09:17 AM   #27
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I enjoyed the post.
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Old 06-18-2019, 09:21 AM   #28
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It’s out there in one form or another.

The most common form that it exists in is the position, usually sales related, that one cooker, namely the latest and greatest pellet cookers, can do it all and do it all well.

I love pellet cookers. Own one. But I cringe every time one of these manufacturers touts their searing capabilities.
Maybe I should have been more specific and said "here".
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Old 06-18-2019, 09:30 AM   #29
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Bro, do you even Beefer? If you're talking right tool for the job then you should practice what you preach.

https://us.beefer.com/shop/the-beefer/


Haha. Seriously though I agree about using the right tool for the job, but unfortunately you don't look like an expert when you post a picture of a steak which has a sear on about 30% of the surface. Not to mention the cocky attitude in the original post about you laughing at other people.

Oddly enough I never really used my kamado for searing steaks...I've got a really nice cast iron that has been seasoned perfectly with tallow, and I use that on my stovetop for cooking steaks. I like to bake it at 350° until I hit about 110° internal, and then reverse sear in my cast iron. For me that's the perfect flavor where I can sear it really well without worrying about burning the crust.
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Old 06-18-2019, 09:30 AM   #30
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Maybe I should have been more specific and said "here".
People here, shop “out there”.

I’m just giving them a heads up.
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