MMMM.. BRISKET..
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Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, equipment and outdoor cookin' . ** Other cooking techniques are welcomed for when your cookin' in the kitchen. Post your hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures, but stay on topic and watch for that hijacking.


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Old 06-15-2016, 01:31 PM   #31
hammb
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Originally Posted by Cat797 View Post
I think you'd be hard pressed to find a truly "all grass-fed" beef in this country. I don't buy it......

I have buddies who raise Angus cattle, that are on the pasture every day, but they are also fed grain and corn stalks, alfalfa hay and so on. Most all dairy and feed lots I've been on in the last two years do the same. My understanding (and I'm not a farmer) is that in order to have a truly grass-fed beef, would take too long to get it ready for market, and you can short circuit this by feeding them grain. That's why commodity beef is raised on mostly all grain and some fiber. Eating grain puts weight on faster, and also causes the cow to be fatter, though not intramuscular fat (marbling).

So, all that to say my preference is for farm-raised beef, not commodity beef. Most farm raised beef in my experience is grass fed to some extent. I think it tastes better, is usually a little leaner, and therefore needs more care to cook it correctly. It's just different, but IMHO, better!

Ed
The farmer I bought a 1/4 beef from (again haven't yet taken delivery) is supplemented with zero grain. It's grass pasture fed, and supplemented in the winter months with hay that is cut on the very same farm.

As you alluded to, though, he slaughters his cattle at 24-30 months old depending on birthdate, weight, etc. Most of the cattle that go through standard commercial production are slaughtered at closer to 14 months old.

The 1/4 I bought is also a Dexter breed, which is a much smaller (about half the weight) breed than an Angus which seems to be the most common commercial breed.
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Old 06-15-2016, 02:23 PM   #32
ibanda
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat797 View Post
I think you'd be hard pressed to find a truly "all grass-fed" beef in this country. I don't buy it......

I have buddies who raise Angus cattle, that are on the pasture every day, but they are also fed grain and corn stalks, alfalfa hay and so on. Most all dairy and feed lots I've been on in the last two years do the same. My understanding (and I'm not a farmer) is that in order to have a truly grass-fed beef, would take too long to get it ready for market, and you can short circuit this by feeding them grain. That's why commodity beef is raised on mostly all grain and some fiber. Eating grain puts weight on faster, and also causes the cow to be fatter, though not intramuscular fat (marbling).

So, all that to say my preference is for farm-raised beef, not commodity beef. Most farm raised beef in my experience is grass fed to some extent. I think it tastes better, is usually a little leaner, and therefore needs more care to cook it correctly. It's just different, but IMHO, better!

Ed
I buy it, I have done it. Get to know your rancher, or raise it yourself. There are some people who raise cattle on pasture and the cattle never see a feedlot. Here is an example from a ranch I have been on that is 100% grass fed, no you cannot buy this in the grocery store: http://www.burgundypasturebeef.com/public_home.php
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Old 06-15-2016, 02:36 PM   #33
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You can definitely buy all grass-fed beef. My friends at Stemple Creek Ranch in Marin County run a 100% all-grass operation, and their beef (and lamb) is spectacular. I'll be cooking one of their briskets for Father's Day.
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Old 06-15-2016, 03:10 PM   #34
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With all due respect, what does this even MEAN?
My family has eaten a whole grassfed Hereford steer every year for the last 10 years, and I can't count how many deer I've killed, butchered, and eaten. They both taste like a slice of heaven, but not like each other.

To the OP's question, treat it like.....a brisket! Sure, grassed is a little less forgiving than commodity beef, but the taste pays in dividends if you know how to cook it. If your brisket technique isn't quite perfected yet, go with the Bludawg method, it's more forgiving. Honestly, I really don't care for commodity beef anymore after being spoiled on the intense true beefiness of grassfed. Let us know how it goes!
The OP was concerned he might have made a mistake, the yellow fat on the brisket tells me this is truly a grass fed animal just like the fat I encounter when I field dress a deer, I love wild venison, grass fed lamb and grass fed beef as well as pastured hogs however many folks have not had it and the richer flavor is off putting. I was letting the poster know that if he likes wild game he will like grass fed beef. Also you can not compare a grass fed Hereford to a grass fed dairy breed for taste and texture they are different animals and lay down fat differently. No disrespect taken.
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Old 06-15-2016, 03:36 PM   #35
BillN
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I don't know if I'd go that far; Bill's a good guy, just maybe had some funky venison and/or grassfed beef along the line somewhere. Maybe what he meant is since they eat the same grass, they should taste similar.

The "gamey" taste usually attributed to venison is nothing more than spoiling meat. People tend to hang their deer in a tree to age, and it warms up in the sun, then freezes overnight, and repeats for a few days until it tastes off. I kill mine, clean immediately, rinse out the cavity, then skin while its warm and easy, quarter it, and wrap in butcher paper to let it age properly in a 38 degree frig for 4-6 days to complete the rigor mortis and muscle relaxing cycle. The result is some of the most incredible meat you can have (I've instantly converted venison naysayers), but it tastes completely different than our beef.
I agree a properly processed game animal is not "Gamey Tasting" the browse and grass found in a wild animals diet has a high beta carotene content which gives the characteristic yellow hue to the fat. Also how quickly the animal is dispatched leads to a more tender mild tasting meat. I have passed up many opportunities to shoot an animal if I was not confident I would drop him in his tracks. I have eaten deer from the corn fields of Illinois, the Sonoran Desert of Arizona and the forest of the Rocky Mountains and all have their own distinct flavor. Grass fed cattle also vary based on their diet, I have had certified grass fed beef from South Dakota and Certified range fed from Az. and there is no comparison. My experience is folks that do not like venison or grass fed lamb tend to find 100% grass fed beef to funky for their taste. Maybe I am weird but I like the flavor nature imparts on game and domestic critters I enjoy eating.
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Old 06-15-2016, 06:23 PM   #36
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.....Maybe I am weird but I like the flavor nature imparts on game and domestic critters I enjoy eating.
Hear, hear! If you're weird, I guess I'm in good company
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Old 06-16-2016, 12:10 PM   #37
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Thanks for all the great comments. I plan on cooking it this weekend. I'll keep you updated. It's crazy to see all the emotional responses when people talk about local grass fed vs commercial processed.
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