MMMM.. BRISKET..
The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS.  



Our Homepage Donation to Forum Overhead Recipes Smoke Signals Magazine Welocme Merchandise Associations Purchase Subscription Amazon Affiliate
Go Back   The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS. > Discussion Area > Q-talk

Notices

Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, equipment and outdoor cookin' . ** Other cooking techniques are welcomed for when your cookin' in the kitchen. Post your hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures, but stay on topic and watch for that hijacking.


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-17-2018, 11:30 AM   #16
Baychilla
Full Fledged Farker
 
Join Date: 02-08-18
Location: San Francisco, CA
Name/Nickname : Joe
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Weld View Post
I watched the video and his other one Texas Style brisket. So texas style you keep the brisket intake and don't use all the sauces and injections, as opposed to non-texas and competition style where you would use injections and sauces?

Why is that the case for comps? If it's to creat flavor, don't you want your brisket to be flavorful all times?
I thought I heard that judges would take a single bite (or a small #) and if you didn't make a great first impression forget it. Hence why some people claim that compQ is fine for that one bite but too much for more. There is such a thing as too much flavor.

I haven't had moisture/flavor issues with properly cooked briskets using just a Dalmatian rub. IMO so long as what you're adding doesn't take away from or overpower the protein then its good. At what point is enhancing something actually overshadowing it?

My $0.02
Baychilla is offline   Reply With Quote


Thanks from:--->


Old 07-17-2018, 11:43 AM   #17
Dr. Weld
Knows what a fatty is.
 
Join Date: 06-24-18
Location: PA
Name/Nickname : Dr. Weld
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Baychilla View Post
I thought I heard that judges would take a single bite (or a small #) and if you didn't make a great first impression forget it. Hence why some people claim that compQ is fine for that one bite but too much for more. There is such a thing as too much flavor.

I haven't had moisture/flavor issues with properly cooked briskets using just a Dalmatian rub. IMO so long as what you're adding doesn't take away from or overpower the protein then its good. At what point is enhancing something actually overshadowing it?

My $0.02
So one bite and that is it? That's stupid in my point. If you can't eat more than a bite, is it really a winning product. Most people don't go out and have one bite, Unless at a tasting resturant, where you can also order more of said item.

Thanks for the response. Once I get some work done around here, I will head to the store and see what I can find in terms of brisket. I will check out prices and see what's what.
Dr. Weld is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 07-17-2018, 01:27 PM   #18
jason&egla
Knows what a fatty is.
 
Join Date: 06-20-15
Location: Salina, Kansas
Default

Yes, competition BBQ is very different than what you feed to your friends and family.

Keep it simple, don't overthink it, just let it go. You'll be fine. BBQ is the one activity where laziness is a virtue. The less you fuss with it, the better the outcome.

I'd actually start with the pork butt first, then move on to the brisket, if possible.
__________________
Smoke from a distant fire
jason&egla is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 07-17-2018, 03:37 PM   #19
Dr. Weld
Knows what a fatty is.
 
Join Date: 06-24-18
Location: PA
Name/Nickname : Dr. Weld
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jason&egla View Post
Yes, competition BBQ is very different than what you feed to your friends and family.

Keep it simple, don't overthink it, just let it go. You'll be fine. BBQ is the one activity where laziness is a virtue. The less you fuss with it, the better the outcome.

I'd actually start with the pork butt first, then move on to the brisket, if possible.
Yes, that's possible. I didn't purchase a brisket yet. I'm doing my research and making sure I have my steers lined up in a row as much as possible. Or pigs if I do a porkbutt. lol
Dr. Weld is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 07-17-2018, 04:12 PM   #20
Rockinar
is One Chatty Farker
 
Join Date: 07-19-13
Location: Houston, TX
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Weld View Post
I watched the video and his other one Texas Style brisket. So texas style you keep the brisket intake and don't use all the sauces and injections, as opposed to non-texas and competition style where you would use injections and sauces?
Yes.

Competition BBQ is all about having every little detail down to a perfect art and science. Thats why they cut the flat from the point, scrape the fat off chicken skin with razor blades, inject everything full of phosphates and coat it with MSGs, loads of salt and other nonsense. It's all about how it looks and that ONE bite. I doubt you could eat a plate of it, its not meant for consumption.

Texas style is just simple backyard BBQ that's meant to eat. You are trying to wow the consumer with the meat, not mask it with sauce, injections, phosphates, MSGs.

Watch the video where Aaron Franklin does a competition. He does not do very well and he jokes in the video "It's kinda funny, because I sorta do this for a living". Theres a video of Harry Soo instructing comp people to add more salt to foods that get turned in later because the judges already have a mouthful of salt, so they need to add more to it to make it even saltier so it will stand out.

Competition BBQ and Texas style are two different worlds. One is meant to wow a judge with a single bite, the other is meant to eat. When was the last time you removed the skin from your chicken and scraped the fat off with a razor? I'm guessing never. It's just not needed. You can if you want, it wont hurt any. But its just not needed. Same with removing the flat from the point on brisket.

Competition brisket.....



Texas style brisket....



Its just not the same.

Last edited by Rockinar; 07-17-2018 at 04:27 PM..
Rockinar is online now   Reply With Quote


Old 07-18-2018, 11:14 AM   #21
Dr. Weld
Knows what a fatty is.
 
Join Date: 06-24-18
Location: PA
Name/Nickname : Dr. Weld
Default

Thanks for the reply.

I will be going texas style ( Keeping it simple) for brisket, at least the first few. That bottom brisket looks slamming and I'm ready to eat now. .

That box has 8 pieces of brisket and only 7 burnt ends, what gives? One jump ship or get eaten along the way?
Dr. Weld is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 07-21-2018, 01:10 PM   #22
BigThicket
Full Fledged Farker

 
BigThicket's Avatar
 
Join Date: 03-04-18
Location: East Texas/West LA
Name/Nickname : Brad
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockinar View Post
Competition BBQ and Texas style are two different worlds. One is meant to wow a judge with a single bite, the other is meant to eat. When was the last time you removed the skin from your chicken and scraped the fat off with a razor? I'm guessing never. It's just not needed. You can if you want, it wont hurt any. But its just not needed. Same with removing the flat from the point on brisket.
Couldn't agree more.
__________________
There is enough love in this world for everybody, if people will just look. - Vonnegut
BigThicket is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 07-21-2018, 01:45 PM   #23
OklaDustDevil
is one Smokin' Farker

 
OklaDustDevil's Avatar
 
Join Date: 10-13-17
Location: SoCal, by way of Oklahoma & Texas
Name/Nickname : Ray
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockinar View Post
My opinion....


1. I would start with a grocery store prime brisket. Creekstone is nice but you are probably going to ruin your first few brisket. If you live in a neck of the woods where the local stores dont normally sell brisket, then yeah you gotta do what you gotta do...get the Creekstone.

2. Do NOT separate flat from point. They cook differently. But you ignore the point. Your focus is all on the flat. If the flat is done, the point will be too.

3. I would not inject. Keep it simple. Injection is to enhance a properly cooked brisket. You CAN inject if you want, but injection wont save an poorly cooked brisket.

4. I like to wrap cause it offers some protection from the heat and cooks faster. Its a personal choice.

5. Make sure you know how to properly slice the flat and point once its cooked. Slicing it wrong can kinda ruin the texture. Also resting is important. I would not worry a whole lot about trimming. You can kinda get away with a hack trim job. Watch an Aaron Franklin trim video and give it a shot. There's lots of videos that give terrible trim advice. Watch Aarons. He keeps it simple.



If you simply are confused and unsure about it all. I would simply cook it at 250-275* till the the thick part of the flat (center of the brisket) is 200 and then pull it. Then let it rest at least an hour. It wont be perfect but should at least be a start and edible. Over cooked is better than under cooked. Over cooked will be dry, but still edible. Undercooked will be rubbery and not really edible.

Only way to learn is just go for it. Each one you cook you will learn more.
I agree with all this except wrapping. Even on my woodburning pits I’ve never needed to wrap, but I do cook low and slow. Wrapping ends up braising the brisket and the texture turns out differently. So I suggest you first try it au natural, without wrapping, then on later cooks try wrapping and see which you prefer.

I also agree with Rockinar that cooking to a temp might be helpful the first few times. I know folks on this site are all about cooking to a feel, but I’ve had success cooking low and slow at 225 to an IT of 203, and the certainty of a goal temp might be helpful the first few times.

Finally, Rockinar is correct that slicing against the grain is absolutely critical for brisket. The grain runs in different directions (which is why folks separate the point and flat before slicing). If you search YouTube you’ll find videos on slicing; slicing it wrong can seriously impede the edibility of brisket.

Some additional suggestions specifically about smoking on a pellet smoker. In order to maximize smoke flavour, IMHO you should: 1- put the meat on cold, from the fridge, 2- put the meat on wet, which it will be anyway if you use some sort of binder to hold your rub on the meat (water, hot sauce, mustard, whatever), 3- program your pellet smoker initially at the lowest possible temp for the first 4+ hours (pellets burn more cleanly and generate less smoke at higher temps).

So, for example, my Mak has a “Smoke” setting that is 180-200, so I use that for the first 4 hours of a butt or 6-8 hours of a brisket. Even when I raise the temp later in the cook, I still have it at 225-250 so the pellets are putting out some smoke. If you raise it to 300 or beyond, you’ll seriously diminish the smoke from the pellets.

Just my pov, good luck and I’m sure you’ll do great!
__________________
Red Weber Ltd Ed 22"
Weber 18"
Mak 1-Star Pellet Smoker
Chuckwagon Cookers Horizontal Offset Stickburner
Southern Cookers Vertical Stickburner
OklaDustDevil is offline   Reply With Quote


Thanks from:--->
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


Forum Custom Search: Enter your Search text below. GOOGLE will search ONLY the BBQ Brethren Forum.
Custom search MAY not work(no display box) in some configurations of Internet Explorer. Please use compliant version of Firefox or Chrome.







All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
2003 -2012 © BBQ-Brethren Inc. All rights reserved. All Content and Flaming Pig Logo are registered and protected under U.S and International Copyright and Trademarks. Content Within this Website Is Property of BBQ Brethren Inc. Reproduction or alteration is strictly prohibited.
no new posts