MMMM.. BRISKET..
The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS.  



Our Homepage Donation to Forum Overhead Smoke Signals Magazine Welocme Merchandise Associations Purchase Subscription Amazon Affiliate
Go Back   The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS. > Discussion Area > Q-talk

Notices

Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, equipment and outdoor cookin' . ** Other cooking techniques are welcomed for when your cookin' in the kitchen. Post your hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures, but stay on topic and watch for that hijacking.


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 11-25-2016, 06:41 PM   #1
dport7
is Blowin Smoke!
 
Join Date: 10-08-13
Location: North East Georgia.
Default Pressure cooker

Anybody cook down their turkey for soup? I bought a new pressure cooker, so,
I cooked down the carcass today, pulled the meat, added the broth back to the cooker. Gonna pressure cook the bones in the broth tomorrow, sift them out, add
back the turkey and veggies, to make turkey vegetable soup.
If you've done this before, any advice would be helpful.
I think with the bones soft, I can feed them to the cat, that way the whole turkey gets used.
__________________
If it turns out good, eat it, if it turns out bad, eat it anyway! Finish Strong!
dport7 is offline   Reply With Quote




Old 11-25-2016, 07:14 PM   #2
yakdung
is One Chatty Farker
 
Join Date: 04-12-10
Location: Houston, Texas
Default

Tradition in the deep south ever since Napoleon was running the show. The key is you need great oysters and Andouille sausage. One of many recipes.

http://www.louisianacookin.com/turkey-gumbo/
yakdung is offline   Reply With Quote


Thanks from:--->
Old 11-25-2016, 07:15 PM   #3
K80Shooter
Full Fledged Farker
 
Join Date: 10-20-12
Location: Hartwell, GA
Default

Not sure where I got this but it's very good.

After Thanksgiving Creamy Turkey and Rice Soup
Make this soup when you have some time to spend in the kitchen it takes a while to make but the results are wonderful!…
The turkey carcass may be cooked a day ahead refrigerated please see instructions, make certain to leave all the leftover meat on the carcass you will remove it after cooking the broth and chop to use in the soup
Servings 4-quarts/16 cups (approx)
Ingredients:
1 leftover turkey carcass (from a 12-15 pound turkey, do not remove any excess meat on the turkey carcass)
1 cup butter, cubed (I would recommend not to reduce the amount of butter)
3 medium onions, chopped
2 large carrots, diced
1 to 2 large celery ribs, diced
4 large garlic cloves, minced (garlic lovers can use more I always do!)
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon chicken bouillon powder
2 cups light cream (such as half and half)
1 cup uncooked white rice (rinsed over well with cold water)
seasoned salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste (or to taste, or can use white salt)
Instructions:—————————————-
Place the turkey carcass in a large pot, then cover with water filling at least 2-inches over the carcass; slowly bring to a boil.
Reduce heat then cover and simmer for about 1-1/2 hours (can simmer more if desired).
At this point you may cool the broth and refrigerate the pot until ready to continue with the recipe (do not remove the turkey carcass from the pot, it will add even more flavor to the broth if left in overnight — remove from fridge heat the pot of broth before continuing with the recipe)
Using long tongs carefully remove the carcass to a bowl and allow to sit until cool enough to handle.
Set aside about 3 quarts of the broth, a little more won’t hurt (you may want to stain the broth
When the turkey is cool enough to handle remove all the meat then chop into bite size pieces.
In the same pot or use another pot or a Dutch (large enough to hold the soup) heat butter over medium heat.
Add in onions, carrots and celery; cook stirring until tender (about 10-12 minutes).
Add in garlic; cook for 2 minutes.
Reduce heat to low then add in flour and chicken bouillon; cook stirring for 1 minute.
Gradually add in 1 quart (4 cups) broth; bring to a simmer stirring or whisking until smooth and thickened (about 2 minutes).
Add in the light cream, rice, remaining 2 quarts of turkey broth and the reserved chopped turkey meat; bring to a simmer over medium heat.
Reduce the heat to low; cover and simmer about 45 minutes, seasoning with salt and pepper about halfway through cooking time
__________________
X-Large Big Green Egg-Hatched 12-15-2011, Custom Assassin 28 In Cayenne Red Pearl 9-12-2015
K80Shooter is offline   Reply With Quote


Thanks from:--->
Old 11-26-2016, 11:31 AM   #4
RL Reeves Jr
On the road to being a farker
 
Join Date: 09-27-12
Location: austin,texas
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yakdung View Post
Tradition in the deep south ever since Napoleon was running the show. The key is you need great oysters and Andouille sausage. One of many recipes.

http://www.louisianacookin.com/turkey-gumbo/
"1. Place turkey carcass in a stockpot, cover with water, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 1 hour."

This will not make a deeply flavored stock. One hour is not enough time to get the collagen out of the bones. I pressure cook on high for at least 75 minutes to get all the collagen out. If I was using a regular kettle I'd simmer the carcass for at least 4 hours.
RL Reeves Jr is offline   Reply With Quote


1 members found this post helpful.
Thanks from:--->
Old 11-26-2016, 01:22 PM   #5
yakdung
is One Chatty Farker
 
Join Date: 04-12-10
Location: Houston, Texas
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RL Reeves Jr View Post
"1. Place turkey carcass in a stockpot, cover with water, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 1 hour."

This will not make a deeply flavored stock. One hour is not enough time to get the collagen out of the bones. I pressure cook on high for at least 75 minutes to get all the collagen out. If I was using a regular kettle I'd simmer the carcass for at least 4 hours.
I agree. Simply a guideline or starting jump off point. Also, never ever use tap
water.
yakdung is offline   Reply With Quote


Thanks from:--->
Old 11-26-2016, 02:25 PM   #6
dport7
is Blowin Smoke!
 
Join Date: 10-08-13
Location: North East Georgia.
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RL Reeves Jr View Post
"1. Place turkey carcass in a stockpot, cover with water, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 1 hour."

This will not make a deeply flavored stock. One hour is not enough time to get the collagen out of the bones. I pressure cook on high for at least 75 minutes to get all the collagen out. If I was using a regular kettle I'd simmer the carcass for at least 4 hours.
I put the Carcass under pressure for 30 minutes, Gonna pull em and see how soft they got. If there's still collagen, I"ll redo for another 40 min.
Thanks for the info!

Quote:
Originally Posted by yakdung View Post
I agree. Simply a guideline or starting jump off point. Also, never ever use tap
water.
Yep, never use tap water on any thing I cook, only filtered.
__________________
If it turns out good, eat it, if it turns out bad, eat it anyway! Finish Strong!
dport7 is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 11-26-2016, 02:41 PM   #7
airedale
is one Smokin' Farker
 
Join Date: 10-19-15
Location: City, MN
Default

The "Instant Pot" is a great cooker. Pressure cooker, slow cooker, rice cooker, and you can saute/brown your meat in it too -- one less pan to wash.

My wife wouldn't make stock any other way. We have also done pulled pork (blasphemy I know), many stews, corned beef, etc. Any of the dishes that take long cooking to tenderize the meat go down to maybe an hour in the pressure cooker. She also steams eggs in the thing and swears that they are much easier to peel.

I think I paid $120 for ours/an Xmas present a couple of years ago. They go on sale once in a while though. Walmart has them on BF special right now for $69. https://www.walmart.com/ip/Instant-P...Mitts/46700672 Really, at that price it's a no brainer.
airedale is offline   Reply With Quote


Thanks from:--->
Old 11-26-2016, 03:25 PM   #8
mchar69
Babbling Farker
 
Join Date: 02-22-14
Location: Kensington, MD
Default

I would put the bones through a grinder just to make it easier on the cat's tummy and intestines.
And yes, a long slow (low and slow?) simmer with the carcass and onions, parsnips, celery, et. al. is excellent soup base.
mchar69 is offline   Reply With Quote


Thanks from:--->
Old 11-26-2016, 03:32 PM   #9
dwfisk
Quintessential Chatty Farker

 
Join Date: 08-01-12
Location: Fairfield, Florida
Name/Nickname : Dave
Default

This is a "stick to your ribs" alternative to soup that is pretty tasty:
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=221475
__________________
I'm Dave
Got a bunch of cooking toys and a custom metal fabrication shop where I spend my time building all sorts of smokers & outdoor cooking gear.
dwfisk is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 11-26-2016, 06:09 PM   #10
roncoinc
Full Fledged Farker
 
roncoinc's Avatar
 
Join Date: 01-14-16
Location: Barrington NH
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yakdung View Post
Tradition in the deep south ever since Napoleon was running the show. The key is you need great oysters and Andouille sausage. One of many recipes.

http://www.louisianacookin.com/turkey-gumbo/
No,,dont ruin good turkey soup with oysters and sausage,,,now i LOVE both but NOT in turkey soup.
__________________
Medicated for YOU'R protection. %100 DAV
roncoinc is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 11-26-2016, 06:15 PM   #11
roncoinc
Full Fledged Farker
 
roncoinc's Avatar
 
Join Date: 01-14-16
Location: Barrington NH
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yakdung View Post
I agree. Simply a guideline or starting jump off point. Also, never ever use tap
water.
WHy ????

the "tap" water from my artesian well is better than anything you can buy in a store and it dont come in a PLASTIC container !!
__________________
Medicated for YOU'R protection. %100 DAV
roncoinc is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 11-26-2016, 06:28 PM   #12
roncoinc
Full Fledged Farker
 
roncoinc's Avatar
 
Join Date: 01-14-16
Location: Barrington NH
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RL Reeves Jr View Post
"1. Place turkey carcass in a stockpot, cover with water, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 1 hour."

This will not make a deeply flavored stock. One hour is not enough time to get the collagen out of the bones. I pressure cook on high for at least 75 minutes to get all the collagen out. If I was using a regular kettle I'd simmer the carcass for at least 4 hours.
SEVENTY FIVE MINUTES AT 15 psi ????

are you serious ???

75 minits would make a brick dissolve at 15 psi !!
__________________
Medicated for YOU'R protection. %100 DAV
roncoinc is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 11-26-2016, 06:50 PM   #13
SDAR
Quintessential Chatty Farker
 
Join Date: 09-20-11
Location: Texas
Default

Wow. Just wow.
SDAR is offline   Reply With Quote


Thanks from:--->
Old 11-26-2016, 06:56 PM   #14
yakdung
is One Chatty Farker
 
Join Date: 04-12-10
Location: Houston, Texas
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by roncoinc View Post
WHy ????

the "tap" water from my artesian well is better than anything you can buy in a store and it dont come in a PLASTIC container !!
Tested it? Know the breakdown? Just a thought. Only suggesting not to use local municipal tap water for food prep and consumption. I grew up in NOLA, any idea where the municial water comes from? The Mississippi River. Countless sets of intestines it has traveled before it hit our drinking glasses. My father as a child had Kentwood Spring Water delivered to the house to be used used only for cooking and drinking. Everything else was everything else. Folks in NOLA will swear up and down they have the best water on the planet. Not me.
yakdung is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 11-27-2016, 07:14 AM   #15
roncoinc
Full Fledged Farker
 
roncoinc's Avatar
 
Join Date: 01-14-16
Location: Barrington NH
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yakdung View Post
Tested it? Know the breakdown? Just a thought. Only suggesting not to use local municipal tap water for food prep and consumption. I grew up in NOLA, any idea where the municial water comes from? The Mississippi River. Countless sets of intestines it has traveled before it hit our drinking glasses. My father as a child had Kentwood Spring Water delivered to the house to be used used only for cooking and drinking. Everything else was everything else. Folks in NOLA will swear up and down they have the best water on the planet. Not me.
Ok,,municipal tap water,,,i agree with you.
tho i have had some pretty good city water from their own wells.
__________________
Medicated for YOU'R protection. %100 DAV
roncoinc is offline   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


Forum Custom Search: Enter your Search text below. GOOGLE will search ONLY the BBQ Brethren Forum.
Custom search MAY not work(no display box) in some configurations of Internet Explorer. Please use compliant version of Firefox or Chrome.







All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
2003 -2012 © BBQ-Brethren Inc. All rights reserved. All Content and Flaming Pig Logo are registered and protected under U.S and International Copyright and Trademarks. Content Within this Website Is Property of BBQ Brethren Inc. Reproduction or alteration is strictly prohibited.
no new posts