MMMM.. BRISKET..
The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS.  



Our Homepage Donation to Forum Overhead Recipes Smoke Signals Magazine Welocme Merchandise Associations Purchase Subscription Amazon Affiliate
Go Back   The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS. > Discussion Area > Q-talk

Notices

Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, equipment and outdoor cookin' . ** Other cooking techniques are welcomed for when your cookin' in the kitchen. Post your hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures, but stay on topic and watch for that hijacking.


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-21-2018, 01:54 PM   #1
BeardedCocaire
Wandering around with a bag of matchlight, looking for a match.
 
Join Date: 03-12-18
Location: Galloway Ohio
Name/Nickname : DJ
Post We All Love Rubbing Meat...But With What?

Hey Guys!
So I have a few "signature" rubs of my own but I'm currently working on developing more and perfecting my originals. Not asking for recipes but you are more than welcome to share, I'm asking more of HOW you make yours. What ratios of salt and sugar do you use for different meats? Any spices you prefer over others? Flavor pairings? Simple Rubs with few ingredients or more complex rubs consisting of many? Any tips or secrets you've learned over the years or from competition you'd like to share?

Thanks in advance for the feed back!!
BeardedCocaire is offline   Reply With Quote




Old 03-21-2018, 02:01 PM   #2
BillN
somebody shut me the fark up.

 
BillN's Avatar
 
Join Date: 03-14-16
Location: St David, Az.
Name/Nickname : Bill
Default

I have two primary rubs SPOG and one a friend shared with me. Can't share my buddies since he has not given permission, he worked on it for years and the taste backs up that claim.

My go to SPOG is simple:
2 ounces kosher salt
2 ounces course ground pepper
1 ounce granulated onion
1 ounce granulated garlic

Mnay of the commercial rubs I have used are either too sweet and/or salty for my taste.
__________________
Bill, from Cochise County Arizona
LSG 24 X 36 Horizonatal Offset w/warming oven,
32" fire pit with swinging cooking grate,
PK 360 w/Grill Grates
BillN is offline   Reply With Quote


Thanks from: --->
Old 03-21-2018, 02:06 PM   #3
Big George's BBQ
somebody shut me the fark up.


 
Big George's BBQ's Avatar
 
Join Date: 02-07-08
Location: Phoenixville, PA
Name/Nickname : George
Default

I like S&P
Smoke'n Dudes Chicken and Burger rubs
Plow Boys
and some others
I dont make my own any more
__________________
Large BIG Green EGG- Hatched 8/17/09
Backwoods Extented Party
Weber Genesis Gasser
Mid Atlantic BBQ Association
KCBS
Back Porch BBQ Competition BBQ Team
Proud Member of the Zero Club

When all else fails ask yourself WWGALD
Big George's BBQ is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 03-21-2018, 03:17 PM   #4
Stlsportster
Babbling Farker

 
Stlsportster's Avatar
 
Join Date: 08-09-16
Location: STL
Name/Nickname : Joel
Default

Always a fan of the Oakridge BBQ rubs.

Dominator Rib Rub
Carne Crosta or Santa Maria (for steaks)
Black Ops (for brisket or short ribs)
Habenero Death Dust or Jah Love Jamacian Jerk (for chicken)

Also love Plowboys Yardbird and Loot n Booty Gold Star Chicken rub for Chicken...
__________________
Lang 36 Deluxe, Pit Barrel Cooker, Weber MasterTouch, Blackstone 36 Griddle, Traeger Junior (retired), Char-Broil Gasser, Thermopop Red, Fireboard

Please consider a subscription!

Brisket is sacred, don't **** with brisket!

On a foggy day with stick burners in front of businesses and at houses burping Mesquite, Pecan, and Oak- the thin blue laying hazily near the ground- outstanding. - 16Adams
Stlsportster is offline   Reply With Quote


Thanks from:--->
Old 03-21-2018, 03:22 PM   #5
16Adams
somebody shut me the fark up.

 
16Adams's Avatar
 
Join Date: 01-16-13
Location: USA
Default

Frankenrub
Add coarse black pepper and green Chile powder as needed
__________________
Tiernan SOB 4-34, Primo Oval XL,
ASF Tabletop,Blackstone 1Jet

The scent of a cooker. Amen
16Adams is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 03-21-2018, 03:52 PM   #6
smoke ninja
somebody shut me the fark up.

 
smoke ninja's Avatar
 
Join Date: 01-03-14
Location: Detroit michigan
Default

Simple. Less (ingredients) is more. Too many different spices just get muddy after several hours on the pit
__________________
Let's all just calm down and smoke a fatty

Help us raise funds to feed our Veterans and Homeless HERE

www.gofundme.com/2s8fv5qs
smoke ninja is online now   Reply With Quote


Thanks from: --->
Old 03-21-2018, 04:04 PM   #7
upStomp
Full Fledged Farker

 
upStomp's Avatar
 
Join Date: 05-27-14
Location: North Central MA
Name/Nickname : Jay
Default

I use the same exact SPOG recipe as BillN, and use a similar Salt/Spice ratio in all my rubs. My Wife and I are low-carb, so I don't add any sugars.
__________________
Weber Kettle 22.5 ↑ WSM 18.5 ↑ WSM 22.5 ↑ Assorted Portables

BBQ Brethren 2018 Tri-Tip Master!!!
upStomp is offline   Reply With Quote


Thanks from: --->
Old 03-22-2018, 08:02 PM   #8
Mankite
Knows what a fatty is.
 
Join Date: 12-16-16
Location: Chambersburg, PA
Default

Killer Hogs
Mankite is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 03-22-2018, 08:16 PM   #9
WareZdaBeef
is One Chatty Farker
 
Join Date: 02-25-12
Location: PA
Default

For ribs, I am going to start dehydrating my go to bbq sauce and turn it into a dry rub. My theory is when the bark is set, i can add a little more of the dehydrated bbq sauce, wrap it in paper and when its done, it will already be sauced.
WareZdaBeef is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 03-22-2018, 08:21 PM   #10
AWilliams
Full Fledged Farker
 
Join Date: 03-13-18
Location: Ramona,Ca.
Name/Nickname : SoCal
Default

I like John Henry Pecan Rub on my butts....but have since resorted to Memphis Dust due to price. For beef tri-tip I like Loot-n-Booty
AWilliams is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 03-22-2018, 08:31 PM   #11
Cook
Babbling Farker
 
Join Date: 12-23-10
Location: Mount Pleasant, SC & Harkers Island, NC
Name/Nickname : Jay
Default

I like to use my palmmmmmohyeahspices!

Seriously, I'm in the less is more camp. I don't do competitions. Some of those guys will layer two or three different blends on each meat. Whatever it takes to win, man.

But I'm a home cook (happen to be in the restaurant business as well) that attempts to respect tradition when possible. I have done the whole "dry rub" thing with multiple ingredients, but I always go back to just salt...or s&p...or spg. And I rarely stray away from that these days.

Everyone has a preference...no one is right. With that said...traditions are being lost & they are being lost to what people see on television. With all the competition cooking shows on, many folks think THAT is how it's done. The unfortunate thing is they actually believe that. Traditional methods (and that includes seasoning) are going away fast. When I cook I can't go 100% traditional (it's whole hog in my region...hard to do when you only have a WSM), but I can give it a nod & put out a pretty dang good replica.

At the end of the day...it's barbecue...and when done well, it's all good.
__________________
"Barbecue...it's just heat & meat" - Circa 5/10/11 - Quote by Cook
Cook is offline   Reply With Quote


3 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-24-2018, 01:52 PM   #12
Rib Rub
Full Fledged Farker
 
Rib Rub's Avatar
 
Join Date: 02-19-18
Location: Cape May NJ
Name/Nickname : Dave
Default

For Ribs and Butts, my main rub is Killer Hogs The BBQ Rub. I also like Malcoms The Hot Rub. Oddly enough the mail just came and I had ordered some Oakridge Dominator and it just showed up. I picked up some plowboys and it was just to salty for my taste. I would probably use less next time, but I really like to give a good shot of rub. I have quite a few rubs up there now. Wife has been picking them up, however it is tough to try the others when you have one you like.
__________________
MAK 2 Star General Pellet, Camp Chef WW pellet with sear box,Pit Barrel Cooker Weber Genesis
Rib Rub is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 03-24-2018, 02:57 PM   #13
IamMadMan
somebody shut me the fark up.

 
IamMadMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: 07-30-11
Location: Pemberton, New Jersey
Default

I made rubs for years never reaching the Apex I was reaching for. After many years I tried a commercially produced rub from Oakridge BBQ Rubs, it was an eye opening experience. I no longer make my own rubs...

However, individual tastes are too subjective to have a "one rub fits all". If everyone had the same taste and preference we would find only one rub on the shelves.

The like or dislike of any rub is a matter of personal taste. Taste is very subjective to so many influential factors;

Culture - Our nationality and culture defines specific types of cooking which uses specific flavors and spices. (IE: Italian, Asian, Spanish ect)

Region - In the United States, as well as around the world, different regions are know for different tastes (IE: Cajun, Southwest Tex-Mex, ect)

Personal - Personal tastes are as diverse as the day is long. Some like sweet, some like salty, some like heat, and others in combinations.

Personal tastes and like are the most subjective factors in creating a good rub. Because personal tastes are so diverse, you may love the rub, but others may dislike it.

I also understand that some make their own rubs for health reasons; no-sugar rubs for a diabetic or no-salt rubs for those who can't have salt. There are even others who have allergies and have to have complete control over what ingredients can and cannot go into the rub. There are a multitude of these types recipes on the web as many share the same health issues throughout the world. Some like to make rubs because they want specific ground peppers and higher heat levels in their rub. There are others that grow their own spices, grind them to specific screens, and and make pure organic rubs. There are a few here who do just that and I admire them for their commitment to purity.

Yes it's true. with a commercial rub, it was mixed in commercial environment, BUT with much higher quality control standards. The main difference is that commercial processors order specific varietal types of spices from specific areas/regions of the world to achieve an apex of flavor. To use a simple example I'll refer to cinnamon; Most people who buy cinnamon from the store probably have no idea where it comes from and how it compares to other types of cinnamon, especially in flavor. There are four major varieties of cinnamon - Ceylon, Cassia, Saigon, and Korintje; each having a unique flavor, these varieties can also change in potency and in flavor depending upon the area they are grown, thus creating additional types of cinnamon (Each also varies drastically in Coumarin Content and essential oil). Cinnamon purchased at the store is most likely the common Cassia cinnamon, which comes from the plant "Cinnamomum Cassia" that is widely and commonly grown throughout China, but your bottle is just labeled as "Ground Cinnamon". Different types are available from some providers, but they cost more because they are revered for their specific qualities. https://www.spicesinc.com/t-searchre...words=cinnamon

The bottom line is that making multi-layers of flavors in rubs at home is not an easy task. But as long as one is happy with the final product that is all that matters.
IamMadMan is offline   Reply With Quote


Thanks from: --->
Old 03-24-2018, 03:42 PM   #14
jasonjax
is Blowin Smoke!

 
jasonjax's Avatar
 
Join Date: 12-20-07
Location: Jax, Fl.
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IamMadMan View Post
I made rubs for years never reaching the Apex I was reaching for. After many years I tried a commercially produced rub from Oakridge BBQ Rubs, it was an eye opening experience. I no longer make my own rubs...

However, individual tastes are too subjective to have a "one rub fits all". If everyone had the same taste and preference we would find only one rub on the shelves.

The like or dislike of any rub is a matter of personal taste. Taste is very subjective to so many influential factors;

Culture - Our nationality and culture defines specific types of cooking which uses specific flavors and spices. (IE: Italian, Asian, Spanish ect)

Region - In the United States, as well as around the world, different regions are know for different tastes (IE: Cajun, Southwest Tex-Mex, ect)

Personal - Personal tastes are as diverse as the day is long. Some like sweet, some like salty, some like heat, and others in combinations.

Personal tastes and like are the most subjective factors in creating a good rub. Because personal tastes are so diverse, you may love the rub, but others may dislike it.

I also understand that some make their own rubs for health reasons; no-sugar rubs for a diabetic or no-salt rubs for those who can't have salt. There are even others who have allergies and have to have complete control over what ingredients can and cannot go into the rub. There are a multitude of these types recipes on the web as many share the same health issues throughout the world. Some like to make rubs because they want specific ground peppers and higher heat levels in their rub. There are others that grow their own spices, grind them to specific screens, and and make pure organic rubs. There are a few here who do just that and I admire them for their commitment to purity.

Yes it's true. with a commercial rub, it was mixed in commercial environment, BUT with much higher quality control standards. The main difference is that commercial processors order specific varietal types of spices from specific areas/regions of the world to achieve an apex of flavor. To use a simple example I'll refer to cinnamon; Most people who buy cinnamon from the store probably have no idea where it comes from and how it compares to other types of cinnamon, especially in flavor. There are four major varieties of cinnamon - Ceylon, Cassia, Saigon, and Korintje; each having a unique flavor, these varieties can also change in potency and in flavor depending upon the area they are grown, thus creating additional types of cinnamon (Each also varies drastically in Coumarin Content and essential oil). Cinnamon purchased at the store is most likely the common Cassia cinnamon, which comes from the plant "Cinnamomum Cassia" that is widely and commonly grown throughout China, but your bottle is just labeled as "Ground Cinnamon". Different types are available from some providers, but they cost more because they are revered for their specific qualities. https://www.spicesinc.com/t-searchre...words=cinnamon

The bottom line is that making multi-layers of flavors in rubs at home is not an easy task. But as long as one is happy with the final product that is all that matters.
Great post, and IMHO dead-on.
jasonjax is online now   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
bbq, BBQ rub, bbq rubs, help wanted, ingredients, rub help, rubs, smoking beef, Smoking Fish, Smoking Pork

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


Forum Custom Search: Enter your Search text below. GOOGLE will search ONLY the BBQ Brethren Forum.
Custom search MAY not work(no display box) in some configurations of Internet Explorer. Please use compliant version of Firefox or Chrome.







All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
2003 -2012 © BBQ-Brethren Inc. All rights reserved. All Content and Flaming Pig Logo are registered and protected under U.S and International Copyright and Trademarks. Content Within this Website Is Property of BBQ Brethren Inc. Reproduction or alteration is strictly prohibited.
no new posts