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Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, Equipment and just outdoor cookin' in general, hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures... but stay on topic. And watch for that hijacking.


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Unread 06-11-2009, 08:59 PM   #3346
RI-Deadeye
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Default 1st Pork butts on the SS UDS

Finally the SS UDS is fired up @ 250 degrees @ 2100hrs. Put on two pork shoulders for a graduation party on Saturday. The pics are not the best but had to show proof that it is fired up. Smokin D congrats on the recycling mission and saving environment. I will take better pics tomorrow. Off to the culinary room to try and come up with a red sauce for the pulled pork.
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Unread 06-12-2009, 06:12 AM   #3347
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Default UDS questions

1. I keep reading that white smoke is not what we're looking for, it should be the TBS. When starting up (lump or briquettes), I always have quite a bit of white smoke--for about 60 minutes, then it starts settling down. Even after the temp is stabilized, there is till quite a bit of white smoke. Am I supposed to wait until all that smoke is gone before putting the meat on?

2. For those of you using the bung as exhaust--does the orientation of the bung hole in relationship to the open intake have any bearing on fire control. If I remember correctly from my Weber kettle many years ago, the leg went into the wind, and the open exhaust directly opposite.

3. Condensation--when I opened my drum this morning, I found a thin layer of moisture on the walls, underside of the lid. Based on the humidity the last few days, I assume it is condensation from heating/cooling in the sun. Should the drum be stored with the bung open so it can "breathe" and reduce this moisture?

Thanks.
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Unread 06-12-2009, 08:46 AM   #3348
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otis View Post
1. I keep reading that white smoke is not what we're looking for, it should be the TBS. When starting up (lump or briquettes), I always have quite a bit of white smoke--for about 60 minutes, then it starts settling down. Even after the temp is stabilized, there is till quite a bit of white smoke. Am I supposed to wait until all that smoke is gone before putting the meat on?

2. For those of you using the bung as exhaust--does the orientation of the bung hole in relationship to the open intake have any bearing on fire control. If I remember correctly from my Weber kettle many years ago, the leg went into the wind, and the open exhaust directly opposite.

3. Condensation--when I opened my drum this morning, I found a thin layer of moisture on the walls, underside of the lid. Based on the humidity the last few days, I assume it is condensation from heating/cooling in the sun. Should the drum be stored with the bung open so it can "breathe" and reduce this moisture?

Thanks.
GREAT QUESTIONS!!!!

I look forward to the answer to all 3, as I have the same issues
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Unread 06-12-2009, 10:14 AM   #3349
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I'm about 145 pages in, without skipping ahead, but I have to get this question in. I have read where some people have found non-food grade barrels with acetone or oil in them, and the consensus is that a good cleaning-burn-wire wheel combination and they will be good to go.

So here's my question: I have access to free drums that previously contained contact cement. If I clean, thoroughly burn, and wire-wheel it, will they be ok to use?

I'm very anxious to start my first UDS build, but $$ a little tight and free drums would be a good kick-off.

Just gotta say this thread and all the info contained within it is AMAZING!
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Unread 06-12-2009, 10:41 AM   #3350
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I have been told that drums are made from cold rolled steel and that the metal is nonporous. If that's the case, once you clean the surface, all the nasties should be gone. I'm not sure if this is correct or not. Surely we have a brother here in the steel business.
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Unread 06-12-2009, 11:02 AM   #3351
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I am a machinist/welder and I can tell you this...drums weld like cold rolled, cut like cold rolled and deburr like cold rolled thus using the if it quacks like theory..I believe them to be cold rolled.
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Unread 06-12-2009, 01:24 PM   #3352
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otis View Post
1. I keep reading that white smoke is not what we're looking for, it should be the TBS. When starting up (lump or briquettes), I always have quite a bit of white smoke--for about 60 minutes, then it starts settling down. Even after the temp is stabilized, there is till quite a bit of white smoke. Am I supposed to wait until all that smoke is gone before putting the meat on?

2. For those of you using the bung as exhaust--does the orientation of the bung hole in relationship to the open intake have any bearing on fire control. If I remember correctly from my Weber kettle many years ago, the leg went into the wind, and the open exhaust directly opposite.

3. Condensation--when I opened my drum this morning, I found a thin layer of moisture on the walls, underside of the lid. Based on the humidity the last few days, I assume it is condensation from heating/cooling in the sun. Should the drum be stored with the bung open so it can "breathe" and reduce this moisture?

Thanks.
Here is my two cents on #1 when I was using a offset a couple years ago, using KF and Mesquite lump.
Top pic is soon after I got the fire going, this is the nasty smoke guys speak of.
Next is about 30 minutes later, this is what I look for as time to get the meat on if the temps are right.
And third is a hour or two farther into the cook.

#2 I have only a pennys worth. I don't think it makes a difference.

#3 Not a pennys worth. I have not had that problem.
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Unread 06-12-2009, 04:34 PM   #3353
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Default What I did this Summer

Fellow Brethren: Let me begin by saying "WHAT A PHENOMINAL THREAD!!!" When I began my quest for a new smoker, never did I imagine I would be building my own. I discovered this forum while investigating some recipes/comp techniques and was rewarded with a heck-of-a-lot more. I began reading this thread one day early last week and well before the end of the week I was totally stoked. Have now read all 224 pages (many posts more than once -- more on that later); anyone not reading the entire thread is missing a GREAT read -- informative, insightful, incredibly entertaining, often funny, sometimes profound. Thank each and every one of you who have contributed and made this the uncontested best source on UDS. You've done The BBQ Brethren proud! I'd like to especally thank the following brethren who pioneered alot of the recommendations here, from whose experimentation, hard-learned mistakes, and innovative solutions I have greatly benefited. In no particular order, an American Royal size thank you to:

Bigmista - Early trailblazer, respected (and deservedly so) by all. Moink on!

Norcoredneck - For, among alot of other things, designing a great fire ring; and for promoting the preferred drilling method: Step Bit.

Third Eye - a brethren of many talents, and inventor of the wiggle rod

Swamprb - for unselfishly helping newbees with innumerable questions, most asked over, and over, and over again ; for fabulous theme music, for displaying one incredibly beautiful drum cart, and for regularly sharing some hunger-producing pron.

Old Bob - For being old like me, mentoring as well as learning along the way, for his patriotism, and for his service to this great country of ours

N8man - For his laid-back wisdom, for reminding me (and others paying attention) to catch the temp on the way up! ... and best alternative use of a C-Clamp.

Smoking Gator - For some good advise on tending and temperature management, for suggesting garage door handles, and for doing 6 butts at one time

Bottes 'n Bones - For having the coolest, most formidible looking stacks I've even seen on a smoker

MT4Runner - For engineering an alternative solution to vertical intake - the much copied ball valve extender

Meat Burner - For his many, many helpful posts

Dr KY - from across the pond (although he kinda speaks funny ...)

Two Fat Pollacks - for Spicewine Ironworks, and a very cool (no pun intended) thermometer (hope this shameless plug gets me a discount on my next order!)

Mark in St. Peters, MO - A homeboy who has intelligently contributed throughout almost all of the (currently) 224 thread pages

Motley Que - Original founder -- as far as I can tell -- of the St. Louis BBQ Drum Corp

Meat Burner, Napper, Piedmont, Bbq Bubba, Barbarian, JD McGee, Brian in So Cal, Chinese Bob, ... and many, many unnamed others, particularly those who advised to "Keep it Simple!"

One quick question - Should the first grill be 24 inches from the bottom of the fire ring, from the top of the smoke ring, from the center of the bung hole or the front of the wiggle-rod hole, from my back kitchen door, or my garage charcoal store. Oh who cares, I'm going to make it 18 inches anyway because I think I can make it faster, better, cheaper. Thanks anyway everybody. Now, about those plastic liner thingies ...
--------------------------------------
Well, enough about you.

While waiting to be accepted into the Order of Breathren, and having experienced 223 pages of BBQ foreplay, I couldn't hold back any longer and went out this past Monday to buy a brand new, 55 gal, unlined, lid-unencumbered, steel (no I didn't say SS -- I'm mad at my money, but not that mad) drum. Cost - $52.50 (excluding tax, and plus about 3 1/2 gallons of gas RT to pick it up. It made my nipples hard (where have I heard that before???). Note: having read about the crop circles remaining after one, or four eyebrow-fringing burnouts and not wanting to kill my weed-ridden lawn and resident little critters, I opted for the "brand-spanking new, right off the showroom floor model (sans lid, since the only tool in my arsenal worthy of an attempt at removing the top is a rarely used - yet badly rusted, nonetheless - hacksaw. Neither I nor my toolbox were up to the challenge.

The following day (Tuesday, for those of you keeping track) I scored two slightly used (well, 1 was actually VERY used) Weber kettles off of CraigsList -- Note: "scored" is probably not the best word choice here, since I paid a staggering $30 apiece for them. Could've, should've, ought've waited --but much like my sex life, and growing impatient and exasperated with "maybe later" -- when I'm ready, I'm ready. Drove around with the two Webers Tuesday night and all of Wednesday, not wanting to expose my new purchase to my suspicious wife (nor did I want to incur her wrath, since I already have a perfectly good Weber kettle).

Finished the last of the 223 page thread on Wednesday, went to Lowes and picked up parts and tools (1/2 inch Unibit and 1 inch saw bit) and, oh yeah - more lump charcoal). It was time to expose myself - figuratively speaking. I unload the 4Runner of kettles, and parts, and tools - found my trusty Dewalt variable-speed drill, and commenced to work.

Removing the sealing band, I smiled as I gazed upon the silver, shiny, bare metal (not orange, not red, not rusty, not smeared with goo, but sparkling silver goodness). My pulse raced. I positioned the Weber lid on top of the drum. Fit: Miserable!!! About an inch shy of covering the top. Damn! (Oops, sorry I meant Ugh!) Thought about possibly changing my smoker plans to include a flat top. Repositioned the flat drum top onto the barrel. I was instantly puzzled at how the top could be so warped when I just moments ago had removed it from its sealing band. I stepped on it, then stood on it in order to flatten it out once again. No luck - this would have to be a problem for another day. I had other work to do.

Measuring oh so carefully, I marked off my drill holes: 4 precise, unsmearable dots 2 inches from the bottom of my majestic ebony drum; next, 25 inches above those (remembering that my fire ring would have 4 1/2" X 3" carriage bolts for legs) I marked off another 4 carefully calibrated dots; wanting to maximize the size and girth of the meat awaiting placement on the lower grill, I measured a scant 1 1/2 inches from the top of the barrel and marked off 4 dots (notice how I avoid using technical terminology here) for the upper grill mount. Deciding which side of the drum looked most impressive, I selected it for the front and place a miniscule mark for the surface-mounted (candy) thermometer. Now it was time to punch and drill (the handles and the lid would come later).

With great skill that would make my father proud and impressionable young women squeal, I punched out starter holes for the three iron intake pipes
and one incredibly costly ball valve. Locating my 1 inch hole saw, I quickly fastened it to my fully-charged Dewalt and eyed the placement of my first hole. Throbbing inside, yet pressing the bit down ever so gently, then "SNAP". The guide-bit broke halfway down the hollow of the 1 inch saw, and rolled off onto the concrete patio making a sound much like the heart-breaking sound of the telephone ringing in a distant room just when you were ready to get it on ... and you just know it's your mother-in-law (but that's another story for another day). I pressed on with my mission, lightly pressing the sawblade to the smooth, factory-painted surface of the drum. And again, and again, and again ... each time the drill bit erraticaly spinning away from the intended target. I pondered. I could run to Lowes and buy another bit. Sunset and thunder clouds were looming in the evening sky. Better that I not waste time, and drill some other, smaller holes.

Replacing my saw bit with the newly acquired step drill bit, I was re-invigorated by how easily and with what great accuracy the bit did my bidding. Holes for the grill mounts -- finished, slick as snot; opened up the therm hole -- again, absolutely no farkin problem.

Next, went to work on the fire ring. Secured two 12X24" sections of expanded metal together, then wrapped it and secured it around a rusty but sturdy Weber grate (I hardly noticed the slight gash I put into my hand from the razor-sharp expanded metal. No time for disinfectant nor bandaids now - I wiped off the stream of blood onto my sweat-soaked t-shirt (did I mention it was 92* and humid outside), then begain fashioning a stocky length of metal rod into a basket handle for the fire ring. Like a blacksmith I hammered on the two ends of the rod against the hard surface of the concrete patio, gradually bending them enough to exchange the hammer for a different tool ... heavy duty pliers, channel locks, vise grips. The heavy metal rod fought nobly, but was no match for my relentless persistence. At last, I bend the rod around the top of the caverness fire ring. Fire ring - Check.

Went back to the intake marks mocking me from the bottom of the barrel. Step bit drill in hand, I attacked. First one hole, then two, then three, then four. Easier than smoking a fattie. I gleamed. Maybe I can widen the holes with this majical drill bit. Bit whirling, I pressed against one side of the hole, then the other. No progress. I tried again. Same story. I conceded. I went back to the hole saw. First I roughed up the surface around one of the (now) half-inch holes and bore down with the hole saw. It wouldn't catch. Then -- inspiration. With little to lose and running out of daylight, I angled the hole saw into the hole and began augering away. The bit tore at the metal, shaping an enlarged crescent shape at one end of the circular half-inch hole. Slowly and gradually I raised the saw bit toward vertical -- until at last the bit submerged beneath a nearly perfect 1 inch hole. Three more to go. And three more times I ended up with nearly perfect 1 inch holes.

I dragged the drum beneath the patio overhang as rain was beginning to fall. Now to insert the threaded iron pipe fittings. With minimum effort the drum yielded to the hardness of the pipe and soon three fittings and the ball valve were in place. Filled with breathren wisdom, I secured each firmly with conduit nuts.

The rain grew in intensity (all right, it was a real storm!), but I was not going to be deprived of the moment. I screwed on the pipe caps, uprighted the drum, and lowered the fire ring into place. I hardly noticed the years of grime on the two Weber grills as I positioned them on their mounts. Next, I annointed the drum with the radius-challenged Weber topper -- settling at a slight tilt. As a finishing touch, I inserted the Taylor candy thermometer into it's snugly fitting hole.

9:00 p.m. Exhausted. Hungry. Wet. Grimey. Smiling . I basked in the glory of a more-than-marginally-successful evening.

Time for a shower, some grub, and a well-earned evening's rest.

(to be continued ...)
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Unread 06-13-2009, 03:17 AM   #3354
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Default Day 2 - Beginning with the Night Before

My head reeled with thoughts about what remained to be done on my Drum Smoker 1.0. I wanted to be ready for the weekend ahead, yet something back in the recesses of my 2-Martini nightcap mind, something I couldn't quite place, kept me from falling asleep. The weather forecast for the next 5 or so days included rain in each one of them. That would certainly dampen my efforts to be ready to fire up the Sumo Pig Smoker this weekend. Only a couple of days away ... What was it? Then it struck me. The lid. The damn misfit lid. What page or pages did I read in this BBQ Brethren thread that dealt with fitting a misfit lid? Two hundred and twenty-three pages; studied, analyzed, catergorized, consumed. But so much information. So many details. So many approaches, always with a slight variation. Who can remember? I could've been more methodical. I could've taken notes. But how was I to know I'd be the victim of a non-standard dimensioned drum. It was brand new. It was supposed to fit. Could I hack the top of the drum off like so many suggested? Should I turn it upside down and hack off the bottom? Who am I kidding? I've got a rusty hacksaw and a self-inflicted wound from the expanded metal. Cutting anything other than a juicy slice of slow cooked pork loin just wasn't likely to happen. Solution-less, I fell into an uneasy sleep.

Morning came too early as I fought away the fact that I had an employer who could care less about my BBQ problems and aspirations. Contrary to the weather forecast (I live in the midwest, where life is always contrary to the prevailing weather forecast), the storm was over, the sun was out. It was going to be a great day ... but I had to go to work. This would have been a great day to work on the Sumo Pig Smoker!

Coffee thermos in hand, I made one parting glance at my work-in-progress project before trudging off to work. Maybe I could squeeze in some time to quickly scan the volume of forum postings for a glimmer of hope, a solution to my misfitting lid problem. Did any of the postings have recommendations for someone as totally inept as me for fixing this project-stopping problem without using a welding torch, a (doesn't everyone own a steel metal drum ...) edge grinder, a Weber lid elonnnnger??? Years of schooling; a lifetime of arguably some very cool life experiences; above-average intelligence (well yeah, that's admittedly a somewhat biased opinion) -- where was the post about just whacking the holy heck out of the drum lid (or was it the kettle lid?) and I don't even own a sledge hammer. Maybe I could use a really heavy office stapler; or a Hollerith keypunch machine; or a PC Junior -- not much use for those things these days!

Arriving at work, I knew I had to rapidly, and ever so discreetly, wade through over 200 pages of Brethren postings in hopes of finding that all-important answer. Injections, mustard slathers, closely guarded rubs. None of it mattered if I couldn't finish my drum. You can't maintain a constant 220* for 10 hours on a Weber kettle or a Remco toaster oven.

Post by post I weeded thru the stories; the successes; the failures; the great new ideas; the ideas -- not so great. Fixing the misfitting lid - a litany of solutions, they were all there; some requiring the exacting knowledge of a mechanical engineer; some, the tool arsenal of McDonnell-Douglas (oh yeah, I remember, it's Boeing now); some, the fortuitous discovery of an old John Deere spare part waiting to be discovered in a friendly neighbor's storehouse of treasures barn. In the end, it all came down to this: rip-sawing, torching, grinding, chiseling, bending and smashing ... and all for the love of a juicy, smoked, succulent, secret filling inside, fattie. Not much of a decision when you come down to it -- at least not for me. I drove by Rolla School of Mines a few times in my life -- I'm sure I could drink as much, and as fast, as anyone attending school there -- but I never have had, nor do I have to this day, that kind of enviable aptitude. I've used a soldering gun a few times -- but had I gone to welding school, I'm certain I would've flunked (and probably injured myself in the process!). Grinding and chiseling: sounds like a lot of work -- and I'm over budget after dropping over a hundred dollars on parts and tools at Lowes yesterday. Sometimes life can be amazingly simple. The obvious path for me was bending and smashing. Primitive to be sure but, in my life experience, has had acceptable results more often than not.

Despite the ominous weather forecast, the sun burned bright. Even in the shade ou could fry a slab of bacon on the hood of your (insert vehicle of choice here). The local (dare I say overpaid, given their occasional-at-best accuracy) meteorolgists continued to guarantee more storms -- later in the day (just after work, I presumed). Looking ahead to a evening of pounding and slamming, and pulverizing my Weber lid into blissful submission beckoned me -- but like so many late night innings at Busch Stadium -- my victory threatened to be -- rain-delayed.

Time crawled as I silently cursed my decision not to take a day of overdue vacation time. Each nano-second found me checking my watch like someone who just can't keep from lifting the lid and checking the appearance and internal temperature of a competition-worthy boneless butt roast only 45 minutes into the cooking process.

At long last, as with all days in my life experience, this (work) day came to an end. As I drove home it occurred to me that my wife didn't even raise a complaint or eyebrow about the parts, the tools, or my time spent last night on the backyard patio. Life is good.

Hello my darling wife. Now -- first order of business. Rummaging through my scarely-ever-used toolbox I found what I was looking for. Sure, I owned a claw-hammer; a magnetic one too; even a heavy duty one I used to chip away faux-stone for a garden retaining wall; but, before I resorted to barbaric means, I sought -- and found -- a more elegant solution: I can't remember the last time I used it; or why I even owned it, for that matter; but there it was, a civilized, elegant, dare I say refined, approach to the problem -- a humble, un-pretentious, hardly-ever-considered for truly manly work, rubber mallet. So I thought, why not -- I can always bring out the heavy duty smashing and slamming tools later if I have to.

I chose the worse-for-wear lid from the two Webers I recently acquired figuring: If I screw this one up, I've stil got another I can persuade or pay someone more skilled than I to customize. And so I began, not without trepidation, to flatten the neatly rolled edge of the Weber lid with ... a rubber mallet. To my total amazement, and great relief, the soft metal of the kettle lid easily, and with very little coaxing, flattened against my solid, anvil-serving concrete patio. Around the circumfrence of the Weber lid, quickly ... skillfully, I tapped -- and smashed the kettle lip flush to the patio surface below. All the worry, all the concern, all the dread, and for what? This was child's-play. So easy, a caveman could do it. Head tilting and level to the ground, I scrutinized the hammered surface for slight imperfections. At last satisfied, I placed the newly-fashioned lid onto the waiting steel drum. Sevens. A perfect fit. Not even the slightest crevice for unwelcome air to pass through. But hey, says I -- let's go the Full Monty and bend the flat edge of the Weber lid evenly around the solid rolled edge of the waiting-to-be-Christened solid steel drum. A dicey move for someone as mechanically challenged as me -- yet my confidence urged me on. And once again I was rewarded. Snugging up the lid around the lip of the drum was as easy as scoring on prom night. With only but a minimum of effort, a civilized tool, and a gentle approach, the problem that haunted me the night before was laid to rest. Quickly, near effortlessly, another seeming challenge was overcome. Brethren pearls of wisdom echoed in my mind - "keep it simple." And simple it's been. Even me, mechanically challenged (that's putting it lightly), ill-equipped (instead of Sears, I spent all my extra change on booze, chasing women -- unsuccessfully, for the most part, and the latest kitchen and, yes, computer gizmos and gadgets that bent, broke, or became obsolete long before a reliable Craftsman or Stanley began to show early signs of wear (sorry for the lame commercial references -- it's just not my thing). The important thing about this rambling paragraph is that "You CAN do it!" It's easy ... it's gratifying ... it's fun ... (myself excluded) it's cheap ... and it's personal. Your very own "I built it myself" highly efficient, super capcity, ugly as sin, drum smoker.

And you can change or modify it any way you like. To my point, a modest and all-together unnecessary, yet chance to make it my own, modification yet remained. Quickly I eyeballed the placement of two shiny garage door handles to install onto my now nearly-complete (version 1.0) Sumo Pig Smoker. Dewalt and Unibit in hand, handles (and my modest, first customization is in place -- did I mention I purchased some honker motorcycle muffler extensions to use as exhausts for version 2.0?).

Plenty of daylight left (and, no rain happening or eminent). After a quick downsizing of the mounts for the upper grill (I knew that someday I would rely on that bulwark hacksaw). Then, down to the laundry room to cop a handful of Tide and a bucket of water. A thorough washing, rinsing, and air drying with my handy leaf-blower (Gee, I never realized how many useful and versatile tools I own!) and it's "seasoning time." My thoughts flashed back to the years of my early (well, maybe not so early) teens as I heavily smeared on globs of Crisco to the inside walls of the anticipating, virgin steel drum. And then, SHOWTIME!!!

First, I started a half-full chimney of brickets, then unscrewed the caps of the iron intake pipes, adjusting the ball valve to full open. Next, I dumped 10 pounds of Kingsford (that I was looking for an excuse to get rid of) into my fire ring and lowered it into the drum. Waiting for the coals in the chimney to flame and glow, I wire-brushed more of the grime and crud off of the less-than-shiny-new grills soon to be positioned on their mounting bolts. Coals glowing, I dumped the contents of the chimney into the center of the fire ring (sparks flew as I was reminded of the suggestion to employ a length of removeable stovepipe to funnel hot coals to the fire ring below). Proudly I put the lower, then upper grills in place and seated the custom-fitted lid on top of my creation. The seasoning, and the beginning, had just begun.

So yeah, I've read it a hundred times before ... and I don't aim to disappoint ... Where are the pictures???

It's 3:00 a.m. (St. Louis time) and the photos have been uploaded to my laptop (I'm on my desktop ... and did I mention, it's 3:00 a.m.???) so pictures will be posted with my next post. Meanwhile, I've got to get up early because, earlier, I slathered and rubbed a 12 pound pork loin and a 10 pound brisket for Sumo Pig Smoker's innaugural cook. (I should mention that during the seasoning I monitored the temps, and she held steady at 220* as long I liked ... then I let her rip to a blistering 500+ (buried the gauge) before shutter her down for the night).

So tomorrow morning (today, actually) will come early, and needless to say, I'm so pumped I'll probably have a hard time falling asleep (despite the assistance of a six-pack and an open half bottle of cheap red wine which I blame for any typos or misspellings in this post).

I'll post photos soon (did I fail to mention that Sumo Pig Smoker is fairly ugly?) along with some pron from todays first trial.

I'll be seeing y'all soon, wranglers!
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Unread 06-13-2009, 04:35 PM   #3355
mr_congeniality
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Default Out of round barrel

Has anyone experienced their barrels warping out of round after a burn off? Any suggestions besides besides "sit your fat @ss on the high spot"?
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Unread 06-13-2009, 05:31 PM   #3356
Skidder
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Join Date: 02-02-08
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Yeah the top lip on mine did a little bit. I'm going to slice down about a half inch with a Saw-Zal every one inch or so then tap it in a bit with a rubber hammer or a real hammer if that don't work. One way or the other it will move.
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Unread 06-13-2009, 06:48 PM   #3357
The Bengal Thing
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Join Date: 07-01-08
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barbarian View Post
Here is my two cents on #1 when I was using a offset a couple years ago, using KF and Mesquite lump.
Top pic is soon after I got the fire going, this is the nasty smoke guys speak of.
Next is about 30 minutes later, this is what I look for as time to get the meat on if the temps are right.
And third is a hour or two farther into the cook.

.

Great info on the pics..... I made the mistake today of putting on my bird and then adding the wood. I prob should have let the wood start burning a bit before i put on the bird. It was a touch "smokey" flavored, but not as bad as my first smoke! ha
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Unread 06-13-2009, 07:19 PM   #3358
ON THE FARM
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Great info on the pics..... I made the mistake today of putting on my bird and then adding the wood. I prob should have let the wood start burning a bit before i put on the bird.

bird?

NEVER MIND................. IM SLOW TODAY!!!!
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Unread 06-13-2009, 07:21 PM   #3359
lfc-montana
Got rid of the matchlight.
 
Join Date: 06-08-09
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Holy C&^P!! 170 pages read, only 54 to go!! Almost finished!! Only 4 days so far....maybe one of these days I'll get around to the build phase.....!!
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Unread 06-14-2009, 02:42 PM   #3360
Skidder
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Did abt's yesterday but this was my 1st smoke for real. One rack of spares done in 5.5 hours. UDS held at 225 to 245 all day. I threw in a pic of one of my comp. sponsors.


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