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Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, Equipment and just outdoor cookin' in general, hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures... but stay on topic. And watch for that hijacking.


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Unread 04-18-2009, 06:20 AM   #16
Big George's BBQ
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If you use Dr. BBQ method is there any problems with freezing the brisket after it is aged
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Unread 04-18-2009, 06:59 AM   #17
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Food Detectives actually did a story on dry-aged beef vs regular beef, with some tastes tests. I couldn't find a link to the actual episode, but I did find the host's blog that talks about. Personally, I like dry aged beef, but I'm more than happy without it. I've had it a few times at the upscale restaurants here in Atlanta. Here is the blog:

"We were here shooting a Food Detectives segment on how dry-aged beef is processed, and why it produces the finest steak-eatin’ experience money can buy—and it was fascinating. The upshot, for those who don’t know: All steak needs to age somewhat before it’s sold and cooked. Even the regular steaks you buy in the grocery store have aged a couple of weeks; this allows some moisture to escape, concentrating the meaty flavor, and allows naturally occurring bacteria in the meat to break it down a little and make it more tender.
In dry aging, though, the meat is allowed to age for another 21 to 30 days, under carefully monitored conditions. The result is meat that looks terrible on the outside—dark, dried-up and crusty. It also drives up the cost of the meat, both because it loses weight and shrinks as it dries, and, of course, because storing it and putting it through the process is expensive. But, man, is it worth it. When that dark, crusty exterior is cut off, what remains is steak that looks as red, juicy and wonderful as any you’re ever seen. And the flavor can’t be beat. To try it, visit a fine steakhouse in your town—and, if possible, bring somebody else’s credit card".
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Unread 04-18-2009, 07:41 AM   #18
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ok, I'm ignoant and to yall this is going to be a dumb question. What exactly is "dry" aging.
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Unread 04-18-2009, 08:45 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baldbill View Post
ok, I'm ignoant and to yall this is going to be a dumb question. What exactly is "dry" aging.
I copied this from ask the meat man.

What is the difference between wet aged beef and dry aged beef?


Wet aging or aging-in-the-bag has become the industry norm, 90% of aged beef is done this way. The beef is vacuum packed in plastic and sits at temperatures of 34-38 degrees for 7-28 days. Inside the plastic, the meat ages and becomes more tender yet there is no flavor development since there is not a concentration of flavor occurring with loss of moisture.

This method has become more popular because it is cheaper and more profitable. Dry aging is more costly due to the approximately 18% loss in shrinkage and extra trim required, time, storage, refrigerator space, and labor.






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Unread 04-19-2009, 06:15 AM   #20
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Dry aged carcases are hung in a cooler at high humidity. During this time natural enzymes and bacteria in the meat do their thing and tenderize the meat. As mentioned, there is some loss of moisture within the meat. Also, the outside of the carcass gets moldy, ugly, and nasty looking.

Dry aging is expensive because of the costs involved in storing the meat for a couple of weeks, then you have to pay someone to cut all the mold off (losing some of the meat in the process), then you have to pay someone to butcher it.

Wet aging costs a lot less because you just slaughter, butcher, cryovac, and ship, plus you don't lose any meat to mold.

I've had dry aged beef and can't understand how a person could prefer wet aged, but supposedly some people do.
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Unread 04-20-2009, 06:35 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chad View Post
I agree with Jason.
Cost and availability are problems.
1. Brisket is not exactly a premium cut of beef. Dry aging brisket is, in the normal world, a monumental waste of time. Then it is slow cooked to "death". That's not to say that it wouldn't taste wonderful.

2. Steaks (all varieties), on the other hand, truly benefit from dry aging. We used to dry age prime rib and other cuts in the restaurant. This was mainly for the managers.

3. We have wet-aged brisket with some success and have been pleased with the results. We usually timed out the aging for 40-50 days.
Chad is that 40-50 day time frame from the date you buy it or from the date you buy it or the date it was packed?

Also if I could not find out the pack date is there any rule of thumb on how long I should age it for?

Thanks
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Unread 04-21-2009, 04:52 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eheath View Post
Dry aged carcases are hung in a cooler at high humidity. During this time natural enzymes and bacteria in the meat do their thing and tenderize the meat. As mentioned, there is some loss of moisture within the meat. Also, the outside of the carcass gets moldy, ugly, and nasty looking.

Dry aging is expensive because of the costs involved in storing the meat for a couple of weeks, then you have to pay someone to cut all the mold off (losing some of the meat in the process), then you have to pay someone to butcher it.

Wet aging costs a lot less because you just slaughter, butcher, cryovac, and ship, plus you don't lose any meat to mold.

I've had dry aged beef and can't understand how a person could prefer wet aged, but supposedly some people do.
It's interesting, I have been very surprised to see how many people prefer wet-aged steaks in blind tastings comparing one farm to another. It's striking how much flavor and texture can vary by breed, diet, growing region, plus the type and length of aging (and relative talent of the farm and butcher). That's what makes me so curious about whether some brisket recipes would be better with one "varietal" of steak or another, esp. one that's dry-aged.

I think it would be fun to try a comparison. Yet another reason to find that smoker on Craig's List.
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Unread 04-21-2009, 08:28 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris1237 View Post
Chad is that 40-50 day time frame from the date you buy it or from the date you buy it or the date it was packed?

Also if I could not find out the pack date is there any rule of thumb on how long I should age it for?

Thanks
Chris
Aging is based on the kill/packing date which is found on the case. You must have this date or trust your butcher. I use a lot of different butchers and don't trust a single one of them to give me the correct date (sometimes they don't know, sometimes they think they know, sometimes they guess, and sometimes they outright lie). For me, I have to see the label on the case to believe it.

If you shop at Sam's or Costco, ask if you can go through their case stock in the back. The Sam's near me labels determines the expiry date on their labels by adding 30 days to the pack date. I still don't trust it though because I've watched them mislabel pieces before.
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Unread 04-21-2009, 09:18 PM   #24
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I'd like to try some dry aged beef one day...for the most part I get choice cuts from Costco or my local butcher. For comps I only cook brisket flats from Costco...though I did a Wagyu a few months back that was killer. Not sure of a local source out here in the boonies for dry aged beef...maybe next time we're out and about I'll pop in to a shop that carries it.
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Unread 04-21-2009, 09:27 PM   #25
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I don't know of anyone that has used dry aged beef in a comp although I'm sure it's been done. Wet aging is the norm for all the reasons listed above. My understanding of "true" dry aged beef is a little freaky to say the least. Controlled temp and humidity and creating a crust that has to be removed before packaging (mold and fungus). I have eaten a dry aged steak and they are fantastic although I have doubts about the fact that it would help a brisket! These guys use to offer a line of dry aged products to the food service industry...http://www.buckheadbeef.com/products.htm...I assume they still do.
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Unread 04-22-2009, 09:42 AM   #26
Big George's BBQ
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If you do not mind paying a lot of $$ check out Allen Brothers in Chicago
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Unread 04-25-2009, 09:12 PM   #27
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I would love to get my hands on a brisket that was from an aged carcass. I honestly wouldn't know what to expect, exciting.
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Unread 05-13-2009, 08:09 AM   #28
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Hello All,

I have been looking around for this answer, but no luck. Can you dry age beef that came from a vac-pack?

I have heard from unreliable sources that you cannotm and that vac-pack beef has a salt in the liquid surrounding the meat.

Can anyone verify if this is so?

Thanks,

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Unread 05-13-2009, 09:11 AM   #29
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i have a tutorial on how to dry age your own beef if anyone is interested. just pm me your email.


and yes, you can dry age cryovac'd meat.
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Unread 05-14-2009, 08:43 AM   #30
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PM sent... thanks a lot

I'm setting up a dry aging refrigerator as seen in this thread.
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