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Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, Equipment and just outdoor cookin' in general, hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures... but stay on topic. And watch for that hijacking.


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Unread 06-18-2014, 09:44 AM   #16
viking72
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A whole lot more has changed in bbq other than cookers.
Used to only put salt and pepper on the pig, then later mop with thin vinegar sauce, serve with same sauce. not any more. Still southern Q?
A lot of pig was burned up in the 80s and 90s using those old oil barrel cookers.
Gradual change can be good and still make traditional bbq.

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Unread 06-18-2014, 09:51 AM   #17
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Moderators please forgive me.
The pit in this link is open pit BBQ. The meat is cooked direct. In this case chicken. The type seen in Scotts is closed pit where charcoal embers are loaded in one end or the middle and the meat is cooked indirect with a cover over the pit

http://www.roadfood.com/Restaurant/O...house-of-barbq
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Unread 06-18-2014, 10:36 AM   #18
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Just a little of topic so don't shoot me

The fire at Scott's occurred when the pits where left unattended. Pit fires can happen in any pit at any time under the right conditions. I had a Small one a few weeks ago in my off set because I eyeballed the angle, brisket grease ran to the Firebox instead of the drain, but I was there to catch it and nipped it in the bud. There are way to many on the Brethren that light it up & go to bed for an overnight cook pit on the patio or the deck. Gentlemen and Ladies don't play with fire it is unforgiving...... Now back to our regularly scheduled program .....Off Rant
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Unread 06-18-2014, 11:36 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QDoc View Post
Moderators please forgive me.
The pit in this link is open pit BBQ. The meat is cooked direct. In this case chicken. The type seen in Scotts is closed pit where charcoal embers are loaded in one end or the middle and the meat is cooked indirect with a cover over the pit

http://www.roadfood.com/Restaurant/O...house-of-barbq
I would argue that a cover has nothing to do with the pit being direct or indirect. Scott's feeds their pits at multiple points, not just on one end. Yes, the fire might not be directly under the meat in all parts of the pit, but it is under the meat in general and that is what I call "direct". Would you consider a UDS to be indirect because it has a lid?
scotts.jpg
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Unread 06-18-2014, 11:46 AM   #20
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An UDS, WSM's, and BGE's may be either direct or indirect depending on if a deflector is used or not.
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Unread 06-18-2014, 11:55 AM   #21
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The definition of direct/ indirect needs to be defined so there can be an intelligent discussion on the topic.

I liken it to sun and shade. If the meat has sunshine (fire) shining on it then it's direct and if it has solid shade (a solid object ) in the way or off to the side then it's indirect.

Direct can be grilling (close proximity) or low heat direct which still gives meat the texture it needs but still allows slow cooking.

Even if what i call a "holy diffuser" is used the meat is still seeing lots of fire even though it's partially shaded
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Unread 06-18-2014, 12:00 PM   #22
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And/Or when fat renders directly into the coals. I've never stuck my head into the pits at Scott's but I would assume that in the majority of those pits you have mop sauce dripping into live coals.
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Unread 06-18-2014, 08:43 PM   #23
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Direct heat means suspending the meat directly over live coals without flame so that as the meat is mopped the liquid dripping from the meat causes steam to rise. That being said, it doesn't mean that the meat or coals can't be moved to a side under the meat during the cooking process. In fact, that is a common practice at least at some point in the cook because the meat will usually need to rest and be kept warm.

Cooking 40 whole pork shoulders or a couple of whole hogs mean a lot of residual heat, much more than will be created when cooking one or two pork butts. At the BBQ restaurant I worked at many years ago, we would cook about 40 shoulders a night with direct heat for about 9 to 10 hours. After that, we would close down the cooker to let residual heat continue to cook the meat and keep it warm until service time at about 11am the next day. So, the amount of meat that is cooked can certainly change the process.
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Unread 06-18-2014, 09:22 PM   #24
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Just out of curiosity is there a good "open pit" cooker that one could shovel hot coals into the old school way? Not a UDS but a proper, larger open pit cooker.
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Unread 06-19-2014, 02:04 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdstoll View Post
Just out of curiosity is there a good "open pit" cooker that one could shovel hot coals into the old school way? Not a UDS but a proper, larger open pit cooker.
I haven't seen one of these in action but it has the right configuration for direct heat and open pit barbecue.

http://www.asadorcubano.com/

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Unread 06-19-2014, 03:10 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdstoll View Post
Just out of curiosity is there a good "open pit" cooker that one could shovel hot coals into the old school way? Not a UDS but a proper, larger open pit cooker.
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Unread 06-20-2014, 01:02 PM   #27
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I forgive the use of the word "reconciliation," as this is one of the dastardly finance chores that I prefer not to consider on my own time... :)

With that said, in my mind BBQ is still done the same way. Now we put baffles, tuning plates, offset fireboxes, water pans, etc., where in the past, they used physical space (distance from the coals to the pit), and burned down coals. We still do this today. It works great, but a lot more labor intensive. Also, the cooking temps are basically the same. Our pits today are just more portable, efficient, safer, etc., but the old saying that it's the cook, not the pit still applies.


However, when I see the word "direct," I am thinking of actual flame or heat source in very close relation to the meat. Almost the exact same argument as grilling versus BBQ.
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Unread 06-20-2014, 03:34 PM   #28
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The only difference, Noah, is that all that "new" stuff works to prevent the drippings from the meat to hit the hot coals. That IS the difference in flavor profile between "old style" open pit cooking and all the new closed cookers.
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Unread 06-20-2014, 03:43 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qman View Post
The only difference, Noah, is that all that "new" stuff works to prevent the drippings from the meat to hit the hot coals. That IS the difference in flavor profile between "old style" open pit cooking and all the new closed cookers.

I'm not sure that I would agree with that. Slept too much in Physics class, so I don't know the exact terminology, but I'd think that there is a difference in the type of heating.

Here's my basic thought. Take a 2 inch thick ribeye and stick it in a smoker at 225 well away from the heat source and take it up to 130. You'll end up with a nice roasted piece of Prime Rib.

Take the exact same 2 inch thick ribeye and put it over a direct heat source and you'll have a ribeye steak with a taste and texture that's much different than the Prime Rib.
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Unread 06-20-2014, 04:17 PM   #30
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