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Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, Equipment and just outdoor cookin' in general, hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures... but stay on topic. And watch for that hijacking.


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Unread 06-01-2013, 10:47 AM   #166
landarc
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I left off the 'z' for the sake of the children
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I'm feeling bearish, and I'm packing a Wusthof Grand Brisket slicer from MABA

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Unread 06-01-2013, 04:45 PM   #167
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Limp Brisket View Post
Have you considered an Oyler pit?
http://www.jrmanufacturing.com/brochures/OylerBar.pdf

Comparo thread on Oyler vs Ole Hickory: http://www.thesmokering.com/forum/vi...c30f8b24091a41

Based on your above post the Ole Hickory may be better for your goal(s), but an Oyler is worth a look at least.
I did look at the Oylers. Their standard pits are just way too big for what I need, so the only real option was the little red smokehouse for my capacity. When I was looking at another building that was tight on space, I was leaning toward that. Now, with space not being much of a problem, and the much higher cost of the Oyler, it fell out of favor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bbq Bubba View Post
Have you been to this Michigan BBQ destination? http://www.lockhartsbbq.com/

Dont short sell yourself on what we Yankees know about bbq.
I haven't been to Lockhart's yet, unfortunately. I don't get over to the east side of the state very often. But my sister lives in Warren so next time I go visit her I will make it a point to stop in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by landarc View Post
I'll just add, I would posit that when operated properly and with good flavor profiles and proper tenderness, most people, and I mean even those who think they are BBQ purists, would not be able to pick out BBQ cooked on a Southern Pride or Old Hickory from other, more acceptable, pits. Consistency and the ability to enjoy your day will matter more. If you can teach a couple of other people to run your cooker, you will love the business a whole lot more. If you are the only person who can consistently produce your food, then you are going to have a much harder time.

In fact, in the restaurant business in general, consistency of product and service is the number one thing you must have, people must be able to rely on you to provide a good product, and good service, every single time. Great food and great service are bonuses, reliability is the key.
You hit the nail on the head. I want consistency, and I want to be able to achieve it without the entire business being a ball and chain tied to me and my ability to manage a pit. I want to serve people good food and be able to spend time with the customers, not spend all day and all night trying to wear too many hats and living on three hours of sleep only to get burned out.

And the ability to do overnight cooks without me being there, or paying staff to sit around all night tending a fire (and stressing out about whether or not they are doing it properly while I sleep) will yield a less stressful work environment for me, which is priceless.
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Unread 06-01-2013, 05:44 PM   #168
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marubozo View Post
Dirty words they are, but this isn't Texas. Partly, it's because the BBQ up here is so far and few between, people aren't going to thumb their nose based on the cooker used, let alone even know the difference. Second, getting the HD to approve a custom pit, outdoor cooking, etc. hell, I've got better things to do with my time and would find another way to make money.

And a lot of it comes down to planning for the future. Teaching somebody how to cook BBQ is hard enough as it is, and when you factor in learning how to manage a fire, or multiple fires, 24 hours a day, that's hard enough for the owner to do, let alone try to find reliable people to replicate for you. Having a system in place that doesn't require as much training means you can replicate if needed, or at the very least, maintain consistent quality even without the savviest help.

Bottom line is I'm not trying to replicate BBQ at the Salt Lick, or any long standing institution down south. Clearly, different methods of cooking yield different results, and often can't even be replicated. But up here, it's largely a business proposition. There's a need for BBQ, and the goal is to turn out consistent product day after day, regardless of who's manning the pit. If people enjoy the food and keep coming back, and enough money is made to keep the doors open, that's all that matters. It's not about being the biggest, best, most authentic, etc. My brisket might be quite good, but I'll still tell people to go down to Austin and have Aaron Franklin's.
Very well articulated. It sounds to me like you'll make quite a bit of 'luck' happen for yourself
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Unread 06-01-2013, 06:06 PM   #169
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No matter what you do, there will be some people who will eat your que and say, "This ain't real (Texas, Carolina, St. Louis, whatever) BBQ."

You mentioned the Salt Lick. I like the place, but there are Texans who say it is crap.

If some BBQ expert cleans his plate and says your que isn't "real," he's blowing smoke (pun intended). If you have people taking a few bites asking for a refund. Then you have a legitimate problem.

"Good" BBQ is somewhat subjective. Bad BBQ is pretty hard to sell. If your que is moist, tender and has good flavor, it doesn't have to taste like the que at my favorite BBQ joint for me to like it.

It is good to listen to your customers -- up to a point.

CD
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Unread 06-01-2013, 06:11 PM   #170
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So on another note. I just ate at a new place just down the street from me. I probably won't go back there again. I had their fried chicken, which they had pre-cook and then fried to warm it up. My breast was cold. I also ordered a baked potato and it was cooked in a microwave. For 2 pieces of chicken, a baked potato and two pieces of their "famous vegetable toast... $10... Not including their $2 sodas... I have no problem with the cost. the chicken tasted good, but I will not go to a place that microwaves a bake potato..
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Unread 06-03-2013, 12:27 PM   #171
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I think anyone hoping to open a restaurant should watch a few episodes of Kitchen NIghtmares, Bar Rescue, and Restaraunt Impossible. I think they should also get with a friend who owns one and see how thing
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Unread 06-03-2013, 12:29 PM   #172
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I think anyone hoping to open a restaurant should watch a few episodes of Kitchen NIghtmares, Bar Rescue, and Restaraunt Impossible. I think they should also get with a friend who owns one and see how things work behind the scenes. Being a great cook is one thing. Trying to run a restaraunt is something else. I'm still shocked from watching the Pollard's episode of Restaunt Impossible. How can someone who claims to be passionate about BBQ not know you use a rub on BBQ ribs. Has he never watched BBQ Pitmasters or any show like that or visited with someone who is a BBQ competition cooker?
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Unread 06-03-2013, 02:32 PM   #173
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My wife and I stay at a bed and breakfast (not my idea) in the New Buffalo area to celebrate our anniversary every year... we'll stop in when we do!
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Unread 06-03-2013, 02:49 PM   #174
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Limp Brisket View Post
Have you considered an Oyler pit?
http://www.jrmanufacturing.com/brochures/OylerBar.pdf

Comparo thread on Oyler vs Ole Hickory: http://www.thesmokering.com/forum/vi...c30f8b24091a41

Based on your above post the Ole Hickory may be better for your goal(s), but an Oyler is worth a look at least.
Quote:
Originally Posted by marubozo View Post
I did look at the Oylers. Their standard pits are just way too big for what I need, so the only real option was the little red smokehouse for my capacity. When I was looking at another building that was tight on space, I was leaning toward that. Now, with space not being much of a problem, and the much higher cost of the Oyler, it fell out of favor.
Here's a Bewley for sale:
http://dallas.craigslist.org/dal/for/3822054253.html
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Unread 06-03-2013, 03:00 PM   #175
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Limp Brisket View Post
Have you considered an Oyler pit?
http://www.jrmanufacturing.com/brochures/OylerBar.pdf

Comparo thread on Oyler vs Ole Hickory: http://www.thesmokering.com/forum/vi...c30f8b24091a41

Based on your above post the Ole Hickory may be better for your goal(s), but an Oyler is worth a look at least.
I lust for an Oyler, but if the guy running the Old Hickory gives a damn they can turn out the goods.
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Unread 06-03-2013, 03:07 PM   #176
landarc
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I cooked with a guy that had a smoker like that Bewley, a lot like a JR, in that you have to feed the beast every few hours. They cook up some great food, for sure. (and yes, I know that at times it seems like I am saying I have seen or done it all, I assure you, over 35 years+, I have been around ). If it is truly in good shape, that would be a great cooker to base a restaurant off of. I still think a Southern Pride or Old Hickory can be a valid choice.

Marubozo, sounds like you have a good handle on things, I sure hope you succeed. For me personally, being able to talk with the pitmaster really adds to the experience, even if the BBQ is great, I still like to chat with the guy running the pit, if you are exhausted, that takes away from it. I think interaction with your customers is vitally important for a restauranteur to keep his business shiny side up, you can read the plates, but, that only tells you that they didn't like it, talk to them, and you will find out why. And you will find out what they do like, and you can push that as well. Being up all night takes away from that.
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I'm feeling bearish, and I'm packing a Wusthof Grand Brisket slicer from MABA

Whip It Off, Chambers!

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Unread 06-03-2013, 03:10 PM   #177
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Some Oylers

http://saltlakecity.craigslist.org/app/3793486993.html
http://kansascity.craigslist.org/bfd/3818125277.html
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Unread 06-03-2013, 03:24 PM   #178
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JR Manufacturing has a new model out, that holds about 600lbs of meat and takes up very little floor space on the line. Its the 250 RFS. I've talked to folks that own both and both say they produce an awesome product.

While the products produced in lots of Texas establishments are done the old school way, there are plenty of places / chains with Ol Hickory's, and Southern Prides. I'm not a fan but they seem to have cars out front when I drive by.

As most everyone here knows you can produce quality Que on anything as its the pitmaster and not the pit. I know guys who compete on Southern Prides with no gas and I've had their products and found it to be quite good.

I'm trying to figure out a way to get this done myself and wish you the best of luck!

I'll leave you with some wisdom that Amy Mills of 17th Street BBQ recently shared with me. "Always keep in mind that the loudest voices you will often hear are the bloggers and food critics and they set the tone in many corners of the country. You must be able to distinguish their {louder} voices from the voices of your actual customers."

Again, best of luck!
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Unread 06-04-2013, 12:30 PM   #179
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Our local hometown BBQ emporium has an Oyler with multiple rotisserie racks. They build the fire just past noon every day and cook briskets for 22 hours at 225 and they sell out of the 250 - 300 pounds every day. The briskets are black as coal when they come off but they trim most of the bark and the inside is pretty darn great. The Oyler is fired with pecan, but they cook their chickens and turkeys over KBB. According to the owner, the KBB is more consistent than the RO lump they used at one time.
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Unread 06-04-2013, 12:32 PM   #180
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Quote:
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Our local hometown BBQ emporium has an Oyler with multiple rotisserie racks. They build the fire just past noon every day and cook briskets for 22 hours at 225 and they sell out of the 250 - 300 pounds every day. The briskets are black as coal when they come off but they trim most of the bark and the inside is pretty darn great. The Oyler is fired with pecan, but they cook their chickens and turkeys over KBB. According to the owner, the KBB is more consistent than the RO lump they used at one time.
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