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Unread 01-23-2013, 12:57 PM   #1
cirk
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Default Recipe Colaboration Needed

I LOVE ramen soup the spicier the better!! But I have no clue how to make the broth, flavor wise I'm thinking lemon grass, Ponzu, and Chili. I want to do maybe smoked pork belly or pulled pork on the sweet side then add it to the spicy broth with noodles and veg. Need help please. I hope it looks like the bellow picture.

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Unread 01-23-2013, 06:11 PM   #2
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I don't know, maybe start with a base of chicken broth/stock or vegetable stock, and then add the flavors you like to it
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Unread 01-23-2013, 06:13 PM   #3
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I bet Brother Bucc's or Brother landarc can help out with this.
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Unread 01-23-2013, 06:15 PM   #4
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I hope so I need the help!
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Unread 01-23-2013, 06:29 PM   #5
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All good broths start with a good boil up. The traditional ramen has beef marrowbones and usually a number of pig's trotters. Of course it needs the usual aromatics such as onions, carrots, celery, etc. I am on holidays so cannot provide a precise recipe now. If you enjoy a laugh and can cope with subtitles the movie Tampopo is the best food movie ever (my opinion). It is all about how to make a ramen broth with lots of amusing distractions. It is available on DVD. I have watched it so many times I do not read the subtitle!
John
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Unread 01-23-2013, 06:32 PM   #6
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a guy i work with is vietnamese. he makes the asian style best soups i've ever had.

tomorrow i'll ask for a recipe. just remind me if you don't see me post.

oh, BTW, the recipe ain't gonna be without some labor.
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Unread 01-23-2013, 06:52 PM   #7
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I got nothing
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Unread 01-23-2013, 06:53 PM   #8
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well, there is this...
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Unread 01-23-2013, 06:58 PM   #9
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Okay, I made an entire post on this, and now have no idea where it went. Here is an excerpt from my blog on how the whole dashi/broth/tare was made.

First, I need to make a few basics. I need a dashi, which is nothing more than a flavored broth, usually this is either fish or fowl based and fairly light in flavor and texture. Then, there is the tare, this is the intense flavoring that defines the dish, often this is miso, shoyu or salt. Finally, there is a third item that most folks in the U.S. do not understand, or even realize is a part of traditional ramen, which is the fat.

Yes, the fat, often dressed over the dish, sometimes actually blended with the noodles first. I opted for a smoked brisket and bacon dashi, the tare will be a smoked brisket, bacon and shiitake infused shoyu, the fat is going to be a curried bacon/garlic infused smoked brisket, bacon fat skimmed from the broth, this was inspired by the work of Chef Danny Bowien at Mission Chinese Foods.
The whole success of this dish will rest on the 1/4 pound of smoked brisket point, 1/8 pound of uncured apple wood smoked bacon and the aromatics of 1/2 yellow onion and 1/2 of a large carrot. These were steeped along with a sheet of konbu in three cups of water at 150F for one hour. It must not boil. I then removed the konbu and all but 1 cup of broth. At this point, the remaining one cup was boiled hard for 20 minutes, I had to add a little water, until the meats and vegetables were completely reduce and the broth was milky with protein. I cut the heat, returned the reserved broth and added 1/8 cup of fish sauce and several turns worth of ground Phu Quoc black pepper. This was strained and refrigerated overnight.

The fat was skimmed, reheated with some more bacon (man gotta eat breakfast) and then the fat was turned off and 3 teaspoons of curry powder and some slivered garlic was added. This was allowed to cool. I will toss a teaspoon or so of this with the ramen noodles just after boiling.

Shiitake mushrooms were rehydrated and added to about 1/2 cup of the brisket broth, a shot of sherry, 1/8 cup of shoyu, 1 tablespoon of sugar and a few shots or so of fish sauce. This was reduced by half to create a thick syrup. This would be my tare.
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Unread 01-23-2013, 07:11 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnHB View Post
All good broths start with a good boil up. The traditional ramen has beef marrowbones and usually a number of pig's trotters. Of course it needs the usual aromatics such as onions, carrots, celery, etc. I am on holidays so cannot provide a precise recipe now. If you enjoy a laugh and can cope with subtitles the movie Tampopo is the best food movie ever (my opinion). It is all about how to make a ramen broth with lots of amusing distractions. It is available on DVD. I have watched it so many times I do not read the subtitle!
John
With all due respect to John, don't do anything like this unless you are making a Euro/British stock.
The reason I caution with quotes is it is so natural to follow our cooking principles from the food we were raised on.
There are many fundamental differences in making a french stock to a Japanese broth.
Tonkotsu Ramen stock:
4kg gelatinous pork bones like shanks and calves and knuckles
5 1/2 litres water.
Head of garlic
The broth is a beige color and quite transparent so the process to do that is counter intuitive.
Place bones in pot and cover with cold water and bring to the boil for 5 minutes/
Drain water and cool meat, then scrape off everything that isn't coloured white or beige, and poke out the marrow.
(If you wish to, keep and cook the marrow separately and add as flavourings)
Over high heat, blacked the onion slices and garlic and add to the stock pot.
Place cleaned bones back into the pot and fill with water measurement and boil, then keep at a boil and skim for 8-12 hours, add boiling water as it reduces and intensifies.
You can add the pork belly 2 and a half hours to finishing time but I recommend you put it in the fridge under a weight to set it then slice it cold.
The broth needs to be double strained.
Ramen has two distinctive elements, the broth and the flavourings.
This volume of broth can be flavoured with Kikkoman soy @ 50grams or 1 tsp per bowl.
You can use chili bean paste if you like at the same 1 tsp bowl.
You will need 6 scallion finely sliced and an option to the boiled pork belly is char siuw or roasted pork belly slices, about 3 slices per bowl.
Half a boiled egg per bowl.
! pack or ramen noodles serves 2 bowls and they only need 2-3 minutes boiling in the broth to be ready.
Packet instructions may vary but taste or squeeze between fingers because overcooked noodles make a spoiled dish!

If you think you can speed up the process by using a pressure cooker, forget it.
I and many others have tried, it does not work.

Bon appetite bro!
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Unread 01-23-2013, 07:22 PM   #11
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Incidentally, ramen broths really come in 5 varieties, with variation within each style.

1. shio - literally salty kelp water
2. shoyu - salty kelp water with shoyu added
3. miso - salty kelpy water with miso added
4. fatty - salty kelpy water with pork fat added
5. tonkotsu - pork milk broth

Typically, ramen is composed of three elements, noodles and garnishes, dashi (broth) and tare (flavoring), each is added to the bowl to create the overall dish. The dashi and tare should complement, but, each of them brings it's own character. I prefer a thin dashi, a very thick tare and lots of garnish. The recipe I posted above is quite different from what I was brought up on, as the dashi is quite enhanced, which would not be typical. Now...

For a spicy ramen dashi, there are several ways to get there, but, I would recommend a miso dashi, with chile added to create a base heat. The miso dashi has a little richer flavor. Failing that, go with a fatty dashi, as the fat will help carry the heat. It all starts the same.

1. Take 8 quarts of water, bring to 150F, add sheet of konbu, turn off heat and let steep for 5 minutes. Add 2 to 3 ounces of katsuoboshi (shaved bonito) and cover again for 10 minutes. Strain through a fine colander. This is your basic dashi.

2. After straining, return to pot and bring to moderate boil, boil until reduced by 1/4 of total volume. This concentrates the flavor. Boiling the konbu or katsuoboshi solids add bitter and sour tones to the flavor. Dashi should be like fishy brackish water.

3a. Add equal parts of white and red miso, I prefer to start with 1 cup of each and adjust saltiness as needed. I use the two miso's, as it gives more depth of flavor. I also dose in a little sake, sugar and soy sauce (Japanese if possible) to adjust depth of flavor. You could add a couple of red Jalapeno or Fresno chiles at this point, generally I would not.

3b. For a fatty dashi, after the boil, reduce to a low flame and add 1/2 pound of bacon trimmings. Let sit at this temperature for 30 minutes to render the fat and smoke from the bacon. A good quality smokey bacon is best.

4. Either way, you now have a serviceable dashi for ramen. For the Tare, I like to take 2 cups of this dashi and make a tare.

5. For a real good tare, take 6 dried mushrooms (shiitake are fine, so are any other dried mushrooms, porcini work fine too) and soak in the hot dashi until mushrooms are soft. Remove and chop mushrooms. Filter the dashi through a fine sieve to remove sand. Add one strip of bacon and chopped mushrooms to the dashi, I like to add a little white scallion and garlic to this. Reduce by 2/3 to 3/4. You want a syrupy consistency.

6. Other things to add...charred onions, charred scallions, fish sauce, charred carrots, ginger, garlic...either to the broth or the tare. These add great depth and color to the dashi.

7. For heat, many places add the chile to the dashi, or use chile flakes or Sriracha to the broth when heating. I prefer a thing called Rayu, and it variations, which is a Japanese chile oil, usually includes garlic, charred scallion, sesame oil and chiles. The stuff I use is smooth and dark brown, and a few drops will really punch up a bowl. This is the proper way to add heat to ramen.
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Unread 01-23-2013, 07:25 PM   #12
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Ooo, a real treat, if you can get enough marrow from pork bones, render it down to a liquid and then let it cool. You can add a small spoon of it over the noodles before you pour the dashi over the noodles. It really adds to the overall dish.
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Unread 01-23-2013, 07:27 PM   #13
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Flavouring broth
1 litre water
2 carrots chopped 1 8 "piece kombu wiped with damp cloth
4 slices ginger
1/2 cup bonito flakes-katsuobushi
1/2 cup dried sardines
1/2 cup dried ****ake mushrooms
Bring to 185F and no higher or you have to ditch it if it boils.
Strain and add as last water top up when cooking is coming to an end.
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Unread 01-23-2013, 07:28 PM   #14
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^^^Oops, landarc and I doubled up!
Well, you can't have too many options!
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Unread 01-23-2013, 07:31 PM   #15
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I don't use the dried sardines, but, they work great too.
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