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Unread 07-22-2013, 04:46 PM   #5
landarc
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Japanese style...Teriyaki...Tare yaki...

The Japanese actually rarely eat whole steaks at the table, this is largely because knives were never used at the table. So, food was prepared in small portions, for ease of eating in a polite (for Japan) manner. Of course, beef was a rarity, and mostly eaten by Royalty, who had a lot to gain by not having sharp implements anywhere in the house. I digress.

Making a good tare is specific to each cook. I can give you mine.

Bob's Tare:
1 cup good dashi (steep 2 cups shaved bonito, 1 4"x4" bonito sheet in 2 cups 165F water, strain)
2 cups shoyu
1/2 cup Mirin (sweet wine)
1/4 cup sake (or sherry)
1/2 cup to 1 cup sugar, honey, sugar and honey, glucose syrup
2 tablespoons grated ginger
1 tablespoon grated garlic
1/2 teaspoon citrus zest, lemon and grapefruit work great, yuzu if you an get it
2 dried shiitake mushrooms, reconstituted, save water after straining

Some people add Arrowroot (Kuzu) which is a thickener, it adds a great clear glaze to meat.

Reduce dashi to 1/2 cup, add all other ingredients and heat to low simmer. Reduce by half, you are looking for a light, aromatic, syrup. Remove and cool.

Cut steaks into strips, and place on skewers. Fire up grill, you need lump and it needs to be very hot. Place the 'tare' in a deep container, a brush will be needed. Placing skewers a few at a time, sear until halfway done, remove, brush with tare and return to caramelize. Meat should remain rare if you can stand it that way. More well done is not uncommon, but, the Japanese eat a lot of their beef almost raw.
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