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Unread 11-17-2012, 06:21 AM   #4
tjus77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeSmellsLikeSmoke View Post
I am not sure why this in in this competetion forum, but if you want a serious answer, the 140 threshold is when the smoke ring stops forming. A brisket will take on smoke to a diminishing degree well beyond that point

If you want smack, my brisket can take on smoke longer than your brisket can.
I'm with you. Any meat will take on smoke as long as it is exposed to it, that is why you want a small clean fire. If you want proof, take 1/2 of your brisket after it is past 140 and smoke it with a big choked down fire (white smoke) and see if you don't taste the difference.

Also, when I worked for a BBQ restaurant, if we were late getting the meat out of the freezer, it went into the pit semi frozen. When we did this we had a more prominent smoke ring because it took longer to get up to 140. Smoke ring is a chemical reaction, not smoke absorption.
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