View Single Post
Unread 11-05-2012, 02:30 PM   #15
jfletcherMD
Got Wood.
 
jfletcherMD's Avatar
 
Join Date: 08-02-12
Location: Greenville, NC
Downloads: 0
Uploads: 0
Default

^^^ I agree with Ole Man Dan - if the wood has been well dried and seasoned, and there's no obvious mold or discoloration on the bark itself, it's fine to leave it on. Along with Boshizzle's example above, I can tell you that the legendary Skylight Inn here in NC uses split oak with the bark on. Most of the restaurants I grew up eating in back in GA also used Oak and/or Hickory with the bark left on.

Of course, no one's gonna fault you for taking it off, especially if you're concerned...but definitely relegate any wood with discolored/moldy/spotty bark to the woodpile for your living room fireplace or outdoor fire pit.

If you've got a good sized load of wood, why not do one cook "bark on" and one cook "bark off" and let us know your experience?
__________________
"Without deviation from the norm, progress is impossible." - Frank Zappa
jfletcherMD is offline   Reply With Quote