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-   -   Rule Question: Deep Frying (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=85801)

jbiesinger 06-02-2010 09:43 AM

Rule Question: Deep Frying
 
I was wondering if anyone has questioned the rule regarding deep frying.

rule 8: parboiling and/or deep frying of competition meat is not allowed.

I would have to assume there is a specific kcbs definition for "deep frying" because it seems legal to cook chicken completely submerged in fat, such as parkay, which to me seems the same.

does anybody know if this rule has been discussed and explained?

bigabyte 06-02-2010 09:46 AM

:pop2:

Lake Dogs 06-02-2010 09:51 AM

with shallow frying you must turn the meat over to get it done on all sides, dont you?
completely different!

:becky:

BoneDaddy's 06-02-2010 10:53 AM

Seems pretty cut and dry to me...don't try to read between the lines!

Ford 06-02-2010 11:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbiesinger (Post 1298793)
I was wondering if anyone has questioned the rule regarding deep frying.

rule 8: parboiling and/or deep frying of competition meat is not allowed.

I would have to assume there is a specific kcbs definition for "deep frying" because it seems legal to cook chicken completely submerged in fat, such as parkay, which to me seems the same.

does anybody know if this rule has been discussed and explained?

Deep frying - oil heated to high temps prior to adding meat and meat totally submerged.

Perfectly legal butter cooking method - not submerged. Butter starts cold not heated.

Nice try but there's clearly a big difference. Have you taken a class so that you understand what the butter method is or are you making assumptions?

Balls Casten 06-02-2010 11:08 AM

Ditto :pop2:

jbiesinger 06-02-2010 11:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ford (Post 1298905)
Deep frying - oil heated to high temps prior to adding meat and meat totally submerged.

Perfectly legal butter cooking method - not submerged. Butter starts cold not heated.

Nice try but there's clearly a big difference. Have you taken a class so that you understand what the butter method is or are you making assumptions?

no, never took a class. I guess I understand the butter method but I don't understand the rules.

I have no intent on deep frying anything, I had an idea that I wanted to try. I checked the rules and my first thought was that my idea could be construed as frying. But then I got to thinking that the butter method is accepted, so cooking in fat was ok. I had to assume it must be more of an oil temp issue, than the oil itself. And I hadn't really thought about the amount of fat and whether the meat is submerged or not.

I always interpreted the butter method as a take on confit. Am I incorrect?

bigabyte 06-02-2010 11:22 AM

What about a high-heat cupcake chicken method? Just as legal as high-heat brisket? Or are we getting into frying there?
:pop2:

BigButzBBQ 06-02-2010 11:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigabyte (Post 1298931)
What about a high-heat cupcake chicken method? Just as legal as high-heat brisket? Or are we getting into frying there?
:pop2:

I think the main difference is the temp at which the food enters the fat, if both are brought up to heat together it is more of a confit style cook than a deep fry. So no matter what temp you end with, in truth as long as both start off together at the same time at room temp or below I don't think it would be considered truly deep frying.

Lake Dogs 06-02-2010 12:16 PM

can we use lard (ala. butter), or any other oil/grease? I mean, seriously. I'm fairly certain that once I take the
pork and beef off the fire, I could probably get this old stick burner up pretty hot and plunk in some chicken covered
in oil and bring that up to a boil (ala. frying) fairly quick. If it's legal, I'll give that a try shortly, on some nice hot
burning oak. I need to work up some crispy skin anyway... Perhaps this is how to do it. Heck, might even pre-heat
the pot, dutch oven style... That way it'll come up fast.

roksmith 06-02-2010 01:00 PM

..not sure what you are trying to accomplish by dropping chicken into cold oil. If it's greasy chicken, you'll likely achieve it.
I always just thought, since it was a BBQ competition, I'd.. um BBQ it..
..but that's just me I guess.

Lake Dogs 06-02-2010 01:49 PM

Apparently judges prefer a bite through or slightly crispy skin. I could bring the temps
up fast and basically fricassee the chicken, then take the chicken off the heat and
set the skin up for about an hour as the temps come down on the stick burner. I'm
pretty certain I can get the back side up to 400+- with the front being only 320, then
immediately let the temps drop back down to 250 and *voila* crispy skin on BBQ
chicken.

The question is, IF I start with oil/lard at the same temps as the chicken, this is legal?

15 minutes or so on a quick bring-temps-up-to-frying-range, then about an hour
back at normal temps should do it. Season on the "flip".

roksmith 06-02-2010 02:06 PM

Don't see any reason why it wouldn't be legal. I have a feeling the oil won't come up to temp nearly as fast as you're thinking it will' but I suppose you could give it a shot. No difference "legally" between that and the butter bath some folks use.

Slamdunkpro 06-02-2010 02:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbiesinger (Post 1298920)
I always interpreted the butter method as a take on confit. Am I incorrect?

To me it's more of a poach method. Let's face it - there isn't a lot of true dry heat BBQing going on in competition (at least around here) A lot of competitors poach their chicken in fat and braise their ribs, butts and briskets (sometimes even poach briskets). It's become more of an outdoor cooking event than a "true" BBQ event.

roksmith 06-02-2010 03:02 PM

not saying there's anything wrong with creative BBQing.. I've been known to utulize the ole Texas Crutch myself.. but as I understand it, the reason most use the butter bath is to get some of the buttery flavor in their chicken.. it doesn't crisp it up from what 've seen. I believe you would achieve the same result with oil unless you throw it in something hot enough to melt steel.. you'll end up with chicken that tastes like grease.

Just a guess...

..and with my stick burner.. I'd be afraid to heat it up as high as you'd need to with oil inside... one grease fire in the smoker was enough to tell me I don't want to super heat it with a pot of boiling oil inside it.


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