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-   -   My first brisket (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=85533)

moda253 05-28-2010 02:01 PM

My first brisket
 
Ok so I made an imrpomptu visit to the butcher today and picked up a 7.75lb brisket. I was wondering how long and what I should rub on it? I was thinking of just doing a simple salt, pepper, garlic powder rub and possibly inject some beef broth. However how long do I need that rub to sit on it? Can it be rubbed and put on the UDS right away?

Also I know time and temp don't mean that it's done but ballpark wise about how long do you expect for a brisket. Also I was thinking of cooking until it was ready to pull. For me that seems to be the safest way for me to do it and i like sammies that way.

Foil? Pan it after a certain time?

Also I have pecan and hickory chunks. I was thinking of using both. Good idea? Bad idea?

jgh1204 05-28-2010 02:08 PM

Your rub sounds spot on. Inject if you like. Straight to UDS is fine. Going to depend on your temps. 4 to 8 hours will be my guess. A lot of people like to foil at 160. I've done it both ways. Get a better bark without foiling. Will finish faster with the foil.

At 8lbs, I am assuming it is just a flat?

I often mix hickory and pecan.

moda253 05-28-2010 02:34 PM

heh yeah it looks like it's jsut the flat but the guy at the store said it had the point. I think that he has yet to learn about being a butcher as he looked pretty young. I think he was an apprentice.

landarc 05-28-2010 02:38 PM

I like the rub combo, should work well. I prefer 275F to 300F and would look for being done around 4 hours. But, that is me, you might want to go more low-n-slow and try for 250F and 6 to 8 hours.

moda253 05-28-2010 02:48 PM

Awesome thanks dudes!

jimmyinsd 05-28-2010 03:04 PM

i dont know if my approach was right or wrong, but everybody loves it. i usually splash with worchester sauce and evoo then rub with my beef rub. i let it set in the cooler over night and take it out about 1-2 hours prior. get the pit set to about 190-200 and get it on. take it up to 160 where i put it in a foil pan and splash with worcherster and evoo (not alot, just enough to keep it from burning to the bottom of the pan) run it up too 190.

i have done this a day ahead and left it whole thing in the pan and just reheated back up to 160 or so again the next day, let it sit for an hour o so and then cut at half time, or when ever everybody else eats.:-D good luck.

i am doing about 4 or 5 5 lb chucks this weekend. i will use the same method and get about the same results as my brisket but i dont get the shrinkage and the price per pound was the same.

moda253 05-28-2010 03:36 PM

Skol Jimmy!

PimpSmoke 05-28-2010 03:40 PM

If it's just the flat, I would definately foil after 140 internal so it doesn't dry out. There really isn't much more smoke after it hits that temp, unless your pounding it with smoke.

jimmyinsd 05-28-2010 03:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by moda253 (Post 1295164)
Skol Jimmy!

SKOL brother!!!

barbefunkoramaque 05-28-2010 08:00 PM

Not to be disrespectful... how shall I put this? Do not follow the temp advice here on any type of beef, or pork for that matter.

Sorry If I offended you but I need to draw your attention to the fact I can just about guarantee that if anyone with any credibility says they make a GOOD brisket cooked at 200 degrees they are lying, or do not know what dry and tough means comparatively to a properly cooked brisket.

This Includes the "Legend."

Signed,

Popdaddy

Quote:

Originally Posted by jimmyinsd (Post 1295146)
i dont know if my approach was right or wrong, but everybody loves it. i usually splash with worchester sauce and evoo then rub with my beef rub. i let it set in the cooler over night and take it out about 1-2 hours prior. get the pit set to about 190-200 and get it on. take it up to 160 where i put it in a foil pan and splash with worcherster and evoo (not alot, just enough to keep it from burning to the bottom of the pan) run it up too 190.

i have done this a day ahead and left it whole thing in the pan and just reheated back up to 160 or so again the next day, let it sit for an hour o so and then cut at half time, or when ever everybody else eats.:-D good luck.

i am doing about 4 or 5 5 lb chucks this weekend. i will use the same method and get about the same results as my brisket but i dont get the shrinkage and the price per pound was the same.


jimmyinsd 05-28-2010 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by barbefunkoramaque (Post 1295320)
Not to be disrespectful... how shall I put this? Do not follow the temp advice here on any type of beef, or pork for that matter.

Sorry If I offended you but I need to draw your attention to the fact I can just about guarantee that if anyone with any credibility says they make a GOOD brisket cooked at 200 degrees they are lying, or do not know what dry and tough means comparatively to a properly cooked brisket.

This Includes the "Legend."

Signed,

Popdaddy

none taken, but your tone was noted.:roll:

maybe my thermo is off but i have used this several times and i have not experienced a dry piece of meat yet. i have had both exceptional bbq, and crap that i wouldnt feed my dog so i think i have a pretty good idea about whats good or not. or maybe its a pallet thing, but like i said i have not had any complaints registered too date.

i am cooking on a cheap offset that tends to burn fast and hot so keeping the temps down are often a challenge, maybe i have been running hotter than my target more often than i thought. i now have an et-73 so we will see how this differs from the pit thermo temp.

barbefunkoramaque 05-28-2010 09:03 PM

This could be the case, I had a pit that no matter what therm I put on it, it read incredibly low. But once again, anyone who IS cooking their Brisket cooked at truly 200 degrees is making dried out Q. Maybe if they wrap it in foil most of the way or have an EXTREMELY tight pit bordering on a vacuum chamber. Furthermore, for the cooking part (not ring set) zilch happens to brisket under 212.... zilch, (well over a god damn long time maybe something will) and I can count of three hands the restaurants I have advised that did not heed my warning and have since gone out of business because for "timing issues" they chose to smoke at 215, 212, 200.

I have also seen my share of people on this forum and others that have tried the Night Train Experiment (especially those north of the belt) who come to a realization that their palette was the victim of local inexperience.

The tone you notice was one of a guy who knows what the common pitfalls are of people who think they know how to make Q. And, we have all, everyone in this forum, have served our share of crap to those who would never complain.

Nothing at all personal. If I sound like an ******* then add "good judge of people" to your list of skills. :-D

Quote:

Originally Posted by jimmyinsd (Post 1295356)
none taken, but your tone was noted.:roll:

maybe my thermo is off but f thhave used this several times and i have not experienced a dry piece of meat yet. i have had both exceptional bbq, and crap that i wouldnt feed my dog so i think i have a pretty good idea about whats good or not. or maybe its a pallet thing, but like i said i have not had any complaints registered too date.

i am cooking on a cheap offset that tends to burn fast and hot so keeping the temps down are often a challenge, maybe i have been running hotter than my target more often than i thought. i now have an et-73 so we will see how this differs from the pit thermo temp.


NorthwestBBQ 05-28-2010 09:28 PM

Popdaddy,

Vicious,
You hit me with a flower,
You do it every hour,
Oh, baby, you're so vicious! :-P

Johnny_Crunch 05-28-2010 10:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by barbefunkoramaque (Post 1295367)
This could be the case, I had a pit that no matter what therm I put on it, it read incredibly low. But once again, anyone who IS cooking their Brisket cooked at truly 200 degrees is making dried out Q. Maybe if they wrap it in foil most of the way or have an EXTREMELY tight pit bordering on a vacuum chamber. Furthermore, for the cooking part (not ring set) zilch happens to brisket under 212.... zilch, (well over a god damn long time maybe something will) and I can count of three hands the restaurants I have advised that did not heed my warning and have since gone out of business because for "timing issues" they chose to smoke at 215, 212, 200.

I have also seen my share of people on this forum and others that have tried the Night Train Experiment (especially those north of the belt) who come to a realization that their palette was the victim of local inexperience.

The tone you notice was one of a guy who knows what the common pitfalls are of people who think they know how to make Q. And, we have all, everyone in this forum, have served our share of crap to those who would never complain.

Nothing at all personal. If I sound like an ******* then add "good judge of people" to your list of skills. :-D

I like your style but your comments are useless unless you inform us on what should be done. :confused: enlighten me!

michiana mark 05-29-2010 01:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Johnny_Crunch (Post 1295436)
I like your style but your comments are useless unless you inform us on what should be done. :confused: enlighten me!

A first time brisket cook could glean a lot of insight and wisdom from the channelled one of Popdaddy. The man rambles( Pitmaster DonnieT), but he has cooked his share of brisket, and knows of which he speaks. Wisdom comes from experience, and long nights tending a stick burner. i enjoy the musing of the once misplaced Texan, and his quest for bbq nurvana. Preach on brother Donnie T, we await your words of wisdom.:thumb:


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