The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS.

The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS. (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/index.php)
-   Q-talk (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=5)
-   -   brisket temps (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=70639)

a55bag 10-12-2009 01:31 AM

brisket temps
 
I read that beef is well done around the 165 range but why does brisket cook until 200? just curious because i had been pulling my briskets around 170 mark just to make sure its nice and done all the way through.

Bbq Bubba 10-12-2009 05:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by a55bag (Post 1052749)
I read that beef is well done around the 165 range but why does brisket cook until 200? just curious because i had been pulling my briskets around 170 mark just to make sure its nice and done all the way through.

I'm guessing thats one tough brisket? :shock:

Captain Dave 10-12-2009 05:51 AM

Yep, Tough tuff tuff. It's to break down the calogen?

BBQ Grail 10-12-2009 07:03 AM

Brisket is a tough cut of meat. You have to take it to the 195 - 200 degree mark to enable the collegens in the meat to break down, giving you a tender end result.

kickassbbq 10-12-2009 08:18 AM

It's Beef. You can eat it rare at 120 if you like. But, a more appropriate use for a Brisket cooked to 120-175 would be to wear it as sandles.
200-210 internal temp will get you moist and very tender meat.

Cliff H. 10-12-2009 08:49 AM

I heard it put like this. Cook brisket past done and into tender.

bigabyte 10-12-2009 09:20 AM

The "Beef well done" temps you are speaking of are "food safe" temps, and does not equate to tenderness. Tenderness is more a function of the piece of meat being cooked AND how it was cooked AND what temp it was cooked to.

What makes raw meat tough is connective tissue. The more used a piece of muscle is used by the cattle, then the tougher it is when it is raw because of all of the tough connective tissue. Little used muscles with very little connective tissue are tender even when raw.

Thin sliced beef tenderloin is tender even when raw, because it is jsut muscle with a little bit of fat marbling and very little connective tissue. When you cook it, you are actually making it tougher because as the proteins in the meat are being heated, they coil up and intertwine together. Since a tenderloin is moslty muscle with little fat and connective tissue, this makes for a big tangled mess of proteins that are tough and chewy if you overcook it. This is why these are cooked to lower temps like 165, where it is "food safe", but not overcooked to the point of being tough.

A brisket is tough as nails when raw however, because it is loaded with connective tissue. This is a heavily used muscle by cattle. Cooking it to food safe temps of 165 actually makes it even tougher than when it started because not only is it still tough from all the connective tissue, but you just bound up all those proteins making additonal toughness.

The thing about connective tissues is, when they are heated over an extended time in the poresence of moisture (the moisture in the meat in this case), then the collagen (which is what these connective tissues are made of) breaks down through a chemical reaction caused by the heat+water against this collagen, and it converts from collagen to gelatin. Gelatin as we all know is very, very soft and tender. So converting the tough collagen in a brisket to gelatin will make a much more tender product.

Collagen converts to gelatin at temps higher than 165, so you have to cook the meat past these temps for this process to occur. You will know when this process is occurring in your brisket because this is when you hit the "stall". The "stall" is when your brisket temps stop climbing from when you first started cooking, and stay at this temp for maybe an hour or so before starting to rise again. The reason for this stall is because the heat is being used to convert the collagen to gelatin instead of simply cooking the meat. This is why there is a stall.

Once you are out of the stall, this does not mean the collagen has fully converted yet. It just means that "enough" of the collagen has converted to cause temps to rise again. The brisket is not normally tender until it gets over 190 degrees, but temp is not the true guide to determine when a brisket is done. This is because no two briskets have the exact same amount of collagen. There is a sweet spot where the amount of collagen in the brisket has converted to cause it to be tender. this is not caused by a specific temp, but by the amount of collagen that has been converted. So the brisket might be tender at 195, or 205. Whichever temp it is at when that sweet spot is reached in terms of how much collagen is left. The best way to tell is to probe the brisket and see how tender it is.

I hope this helps.

Cliff H. 10-12-2009 09:45 AM

Dang Chris, way to get it all out there.

a55bag 10-12-2009 04:05 PM

makes sense thanks guys.

leanza 10-12-2009 04:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cliff H. (Post 1053012)
Dang Chris, way to get it all out there.

Chris is the our In House Encyclopedia of BBQ.

HARRYSTOWN 10-12-2009 04:13 PM

Alton Brown couldn't of said it better himself.

BBQ Grail 10-12-2009 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cliff H. (Post 1053012)
Dang Chris, way to get it all out there.

Quote:

Originally Posted by leanza (Post 1053549)
Chris is the our In House Encyclopedia of BBQ.

Quote:

Originally Posted by HARRYSTOWN (Post 1053553)
Alton Brown couldn't of said it better himself.

Chris...please call Shane...

bigabyte 10-12-2009 05:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BBQ Grail (Post 1053623)
Chris...please call Shane...

You can lead a horse to water...

hogwild284 10-12-2009 06:02 PM

Great info Chris. All information here is always appreciated.

Ninesixteen 10-13-2009 12:24 PM

Ok I have a question. What do you do if parts of the brisket are done and other parts aren't(according to the probe test)? How do you prevent the parts that are done from over cooking and drying out while waiting for the other parts of the brisket to cook as well?


(Sorry, I'm still a newb)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:24 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise v2.6.0 Beta 4 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
2003 -2012 BBQ-Brethren Inc. All rights reserved. All Content and Flaming Pig Logo are registered and protected under U.S and International Copyright and Trademarks. Content Within this Website Is Property of BBQ Brethren Inc. Reproduction or alteration is strictly prohibited.