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-   -   Question About Brisket Stall Temperature (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=64674)

Greg60525 07-05-2009 04:28 PM

Question About Brisket Stall Temperature
 
I always hear that the stall temperature is around 160F.

My question is does the stall temperature depend on the cook temperature?

Lets assume you are cooking at grate temp of 225F, a popular temp. You hit the stall temp and it stays there for a few hours and then rises after that.

If you cook at a lower temp, say 210F, is the stall temp still 160F or does it occur at a lower temperature?

I you cook at a higher temp, say 300F, is the stall temp still 160F or does it occur at a higher temperature? I've heard of people saying that you will blow through the stall temp and not sit in that sweet spot where the collagen is breaking down. I would think that you would hit some other temperature, maybe close to the final temp and the collagen would continue to break down.

What's the science behind this?

Thanks,

thillin 07-05-2009 04:50 PM

It always hits me anywhere between 160-167 if I cook at 220 or 260.

bbqbull 07-05-2009 06:05 PM

Thats normal when I cook at 250 degrees.
My briskets and pork butts stall, may hang there for a few hours then start climbing higher.

When your brisket hits 190, slide a probe into the side of it. If it goes in like butter its done.
If you feel resistance, let it go to 200 degrees and give it the poke test again before pulling off the fire.
The probe must go in very easily, then you know its done.

Kevin 07-05-2009 06:13 PM

Pretty much happens at 160 for me. No matter the cooking temp or cooker. Did an over nighter Friday and the temp hit 160, then dropped a few degrees, took about 2.5 hours before it started climbing again.

ezmuny13 07-05-2009 08:36 PM

y does it do this

Greg60525 07-05-2009 08:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bbqbull (Post 965559)
When your brisket hits 190, slide a probe into the side of it. If it goes in like butter its done.
If you feel resistance, let it go to 200 degrees and give it the poke test again before pulling off the fire.
The probe must go in very easily, then you know its done.

Bull,

When I checked it the internal was 200, but the probe had resistance. The next time I checked it the temp was 207 (about 2.5 hours later) and the probe went in like butter. Pulled it off the pit, foiled it and held in the cooler for about an hour or so.........had to take it to my sister's house. The brisket was very tender and tasty, but it was not juicy. I would'nt say it was dry, but it did lack any extra juice. I probably should have checked it more often, but I hate opening the pit. I was using a multi channel digital T/C (Fluke), so I don't have to open the pit to check the temp.
Do you think if I took it off earlier I would have a juicer brisket?

Thanks,

bbq lover 07-05-2009 09:02 PM

I would say by reading your post if you pulled and foiled right from smoker there is a problem it keeps cooking when you foil next time let it rest to maybe 160 or so then foil this time will have stopped the cooking prossess and now its just foiled to keep temp .. just my to cents hope that helps

Solidkick 07-05-2009 09:04 PM

Some just turn out dry, I've never really understood why.

bbqbull 07-05-2009 09:11 PM

Next time you pull a brisket and foil it, try adding a half cup of beef broth inside the foil.
Do you know what grade brisket was by chance?

I always buy choice, select grade briskets dont have quite as good of marbling.
Ive had choice grade briskets turn out dry before as well.

BBQchef33 07-05-2009 10:19 PM

i never bring a brisket to 200.. if its still tight at 188-190+, I pull it, foil it tight and cooler it.. let it rest a few hours until its tender. IMO, cooking to 200 will start to dry it out.

mbshop 07-05-2009 11:17 PM

i did a high heat brisket sat. i cooked at an avg temp of 325 and noticed very little plateau. i cooked it to 200 and soft when probing and it came out just fine. a little to soft for me as i like a little chew but wife likes it so its a hit.

Greg60525 07-05-2009 11:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bbq lover (Post 965714)
I would say by reading your post if you pulled and foiled right from smoker there is a problem it keeps cooking when you foil next time let it rest to maybe 160 or so then foil this time will have stopped the cooking prossess and now its just foiled to keep temp .. just my to cents hope that helps

That's exactly what I did..........right from the pit, into foil and into a preheated cooler. Three briskets, each wrapped in foil and then a towel and all 3 placed into the cooler..........one large heat mass.


Quote:

Originally Posted by bbqbull (Post 965723)
Next time you pull a brisket and foil it, try adding a half cup of beef broth inside the foil.
Do you know what grade brisket was by chance?

I always buy choice, select grade briskets dont have quite as good of marbling.
Ive had choice grade briskets turn out dry before as well.

Choice from Sam's club. Three small flats..... ~ 6.5 pounds each.


Quote:

Originally Posted by BBQchef33 (Post 965782)
i never bring a brisket to 200.. if its still tight at 188-190+, I pull it, foil it tight and cooler it.. let it rest a few hours until its tender. IMO, cooking to 200 will start to dry it out.

OK, this could be part of the problem. I've done this before, but could not get that competition tenderness........good for sandwiches, but would fail the "pull test". I've been cooking at a target grate temp of 250, swinging between 240 and 260. I throw it on at ~ 350 when the temp is falling from it's initial preheat stage.
Is it possible that I need to cook longer at a lower temperature to avoid drying out?

Thanks,

Desert Dweller 07-06-2009 06:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mbshop (Post 965829)
a little to soft for me as i like a little chew but wife likes it so its a hit.

When mama is happy, everyone is happy...

michiana mark 07-06-2009 07:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bbqbull (Post 965723)
Next time you pull a brisket and foil it, try adding a half cup of beef broth inside the foil.

I'm with Bull on this. I always add back moisture during the coolering process. I believe the "funk" on this is that collegen is broken down and mouister moves it out. The Funkmaster will elaborate more on this when he chimes in.:-D

HeSmellsLikeSmoke 07-06-2009 09:14 AM

In my experience, briskets that are very flexible when you buy them end up being very juicy at the end of the cook. I think the stiff ones are the ones that end up not being juicy like yours.

I ask my butcher for the most flexible brisket he has. Give it a try next time.


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