The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS.

The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS. (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/index.php)
-   Q-talk (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=5)
-   -   Creosote? (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=56151)

SmokinRoo 02-02-2009 09:32 PM

Creosote?
 
Hey there - I posted recently on whether my charcoal was any good and it was suggested that creosote is what's giving my cooking a bitter, tarry taste.

I opened the lid of the kettle the other day and found that there was a clear yellowish, brittle substance settled in water pan that took some chipping off with a screwdriver...

Could this be the creosite?

Also, regarding process, I usually get the charcoal going under the lid and bring the temp up to desired. I usually only throw in a chunk of hickory when i place the meat in (so as to not waste smoke...). Could this be part of the problem?

http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n...t/DSC01284.jpg

http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n...t/DSC01285.jpg

http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n...t/DSC01287.jpg

HeSmellsLikeSmoke 02-02-2009 09:36 PM

If you still have or can get some more to test. Try lighting it on fire. If it is creosote, it will easily ignite and puff up as it burns.

Norcoredneck 02-03-2009 05:39 AM

Looks more like grease/Fat to me.

HeSmellsLikeSmoke 02-03-2009 05:41 AM

I had the grease thought too. All the creosote i have seen is black.

Desert Dweller 02-03-2009 07:18 AM

I always get the fire going with lid off. Don't know that is makes a difference re: creosote; But oxegen is fuel, and the more fuel the quicker it will be ready for cooking I guess...

ZBQ 02-03-2009 07:41 AM

My only thoughts are:

1.) are you sure that the wood is hickory, not pine? (yellowish stuff, pine tar resins?)

2.) is the wood seasoned, not green?

3.) Your not using that Pinion wood they sell for chimineas are you?

I'm with Pat though, yellowish stuff looks kinda like grease......but it should be
soft enough just to scrape up with a spoon and not require chipping.

SmokinRoo 02-05-2009 12:02 AM

The wood is hickory - have to buy the Charcoal Companion pre packs, cos we dont have hickory growing here.

I ran a cigarette lighter over the "stuff" and it fizzled and left a crusty ash.
It burned pretty easily.

With the chunks, I'm wondering how others do it - am i in danger of getting some nasty flavour from placing the chunks in at the same time as the food?
I wouldnt have thought so, but I'm thinking, just maybe this could have something to do with it.

Norcoredneck 02-05-2009 04:09 AM

How about some close up pictures of this "Hickory".

HeSmellsLikeSmoke 02-05-2009 04:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SmokinRoo (Post 844240)
I ran a cigarette lighter over the "stuff" and it fizzled and left a crusty ash.
It burned pretty easily.

That is what creosote does and the crust is considerably thicker than the creosote layer.

bigabyte 02-05-2009 08:21 AM

That is definitely creosote. You will get this built up because the wood is not buring clean. You need one or more of more air, more heat or less fuel. A small clean burning fire can give you the same temps of a large smoldering fire, but with less gunk coming off in the smoke.

SmokinRoo 02-05-2009 09:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigabyte (Post 844327)
That is definitely creosote. You will get this built up because the wood is not buring clean. You need one or more of more air, more heat or less fuel. A small clean burning fire can give you the same temps of a large smoldering fire, but with less gunk coming off in the smoke.

Thats great, thanks for that.

So, so you think the creosote would be coming from the wood or the charcoal?
As i posted, I usually put the chunks in when i put the food in so as not to waste the smoke. I find I usually get about an hour per chunk of hickory (or thereabouts) and I usually throw another chunk in when theere's no more smoke.
Do you think I should let it smoke a while before I put the food in?
What about replenishing chunks? How many pieces all up is a good amount to use per cook (say for a butt)?

bigabyte 02-05-2009 09:14 PM

Most likely the wood, but it could come from the charcoal, epsecially if the charcoal was not fully cooked.
How big is your firebox? I have an offset Brinkmann Smoke N Pit Deluxe which I have to refuel and when I refuel I add about 3 or 4 fist sized chunks.

HeSmellsLikeSmoke 02-05-2009 09:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SmokinRoo (Post 844860)
. I find I usually get about an hour per chunk of hickory (or thereabouts) and I usually throw another chunk in when theere's no more smoke.

I think this may be your problem. You don't actually want to see a lot of smoke -- especially white or yellowish smoke. What you want is "sweet blue smoke" which is not all that perceptible.

I think your chunks are too big and/or your fire is too small if they last an hour. Try smaller chunks and a hotter fire. Also, don't soak the chunks in water if you are doing that.

SmokinRoo 02-05-2009 10:58 PM

Thanks so much - this is making sense now.

When I first get it going the smoke billows out, spilling under the lid.
I'm using a kettle at this stage just to get it right.

I'm thinking that I should throw in 2-3 chunks and let 'em smoke down and then put the food in

SmokinRoo 02-07-2009 10:43 PM

so i shouldn't add any hickory chunks during the cook? but just rely on what I throw in initially?


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:07 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
2003 -2012 BBQ-Brethren Inc. All rights reserved. All Content and Flaming Pig Logo are registered and protected under U.S and International Copyright and Trademarks. Content Within this Website Is Property of BBQ Brethren Inc. Reproduction or alteration is strictly prohibited.