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-   -   Ancho Chili Powder (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=40287)

hd4me 04-03-2008 10:31 AM

Ancho Chili Powder
 
I see a lot of recipes that call for Ancho chili powder???? I cant find it anywhere. Is it something I need to find, does it have a different taste than regular chili powder? Please advise.

Thanks
Mark

Westexbbq 04-03-2008 10:33 AM

Check out Mild Bills.
I think the link is www.mildbills.com

ZBQ 04-03-2008 10:39 AM

Here is a link to where I buy it.

There is a good description there too.

They are the base for most commercial chili powders (McCormicks, Durkee etc.), which are actually a mixture of several ingredients.

Pretty mild. Only 3,000 units as compared to a jap at about 25,000.

From the link above:

Ground Ancho Chili Pepper
Ancho pepper is the most popular chili pepper for Mexican cooking. They are not hot, just richly flavorful with a beautiful purple color. From New Mexico.
To make your own chili powder: Start with 3 TB. ground Ancho, add 1 tsp. cumin and Mexican oregano, along with garlic, onion and hot peppers to taste. Use 1-2 TB. per quart of chili.

TOPS BBQ 04-03-2008 10:43 AM

There are very few Ancho Chili products out there are "pure" (no added ingredients). You can purchase some here as well: http://http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bi.../shophome.html

billm 04-03-2008 11:09 AM

you can try this place..been getting it from Jane for years now..good stuff and her prices are great
www.letsspiceitup.com

DOHCFOX 04-03-2008 11:21 AM

I use home made ancho chile powder in soups, chili, rubs, etc. Dried Ancho chiles are easily found in Mexican tiendas and a coffee grinder will make quick work of them. Make sure to remove the stem, vain, and seeds first. Cut them into manageable sized bits before grinding in the coffee grinder.

Ancho chiles are not terribly spicy. They do add a considerable amount of depth and richness to whatever they are used in though, and are certainly a kick ass addition to any BBQ sauce one might make. When making sauces, I prefer to make up an Ancho chile paste first. I toast them quickly under the broiler and then boil them until tender in a sauce pan. Again, the chiles need to be de-vained and all that first. Toss the tender chiles into your blender and add a small amount of reserved water from the sauce pan before blending, as the resulting paste can be quite thick. Add the paste to your sauce, soup, marinade, or whatever you like.

Yeah! My first post! :biggrin:

Plowboy 04-03-2008 11:45 AM

Like has been said, most commercial chili powders are mostly ancho. Depending on the recipe, I wouldn't worry too much about finding pure ancho. I've got straight ancho from a local spice store and can't tell much difference from a McCormick's dark chili powder.

Mark 04-03-2008 11:55 AM

You've gotten good replies, Really nothing else I can add except maybe grow your own. And also consider pasilla peppers (similar). I grow and smoke dry both. However, smoke dried would be redundant for rubs. Here's a batch I brought to Greg's last bash and stuffed with sausage.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/gallery/...urd_production

Jorge 04-03-2008 11:58 AM

penderys.com is another quality source.

Brian in So Cal 04-03-2008 01:37 PM

I sometimes in a pinch will can get it at Vons. But it is really expensive. Nice to see some links to other places to buy.

Kevin 04-03-2008 05:32 PM

Many of the larger grocery stores around here have dried Ancho chili powder available in the produce aisle. Look for the bulk spices that they bag and label "in store". Usually fresh and inexpensive here.

hd4me 04-04-2008 01:41 PM

As usual a brother can get all the help he needs here. What a great place!

Thanks guys!!!!!!!!!!

nmayeux 04-04-2008 07:49 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mark (Post 605105)
You've gotten good replies, Really nothing else I can add except maybe grow your own. And also consider pasilla peppers (similar). I grow and smoke dry both. However, smoke dried would be redundant for rubs. Here's a batch I brought to Greg's last bash and stuffed with sausage.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/gallery/...urd_production

Great advice, and then you can tweak the ingredients and make a much better powder than you can buy! I love comparing my homemade powder with the store bought stuff.

Bearbonez 04-04-2008 08:23 PM

Check the produce area at Wally World. Ours has a variety of dried chiles, including anchos which are dried poblanos. But if you can grow yourself, even better. Poblanos make great moles, salsas, rellenos, and some really great GIANT ABT's.

Westexbbq 04-04-2008 10:28 PM

My WW doesn't but you are right on about poblanos.;
love it when I find 'em.


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