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-   -   Bark Bark Bark???? (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=26504)

Meat Burner 04-25-2007 09:50 PM

Bark Bark Bark????
 
I love bark! If you foil and cooler, how do you get the crispy bark? It is so good!

MilitantSquatter 04-26-2007 05:16 AM

Either foil later in the cook, don't foil at all or you can try foiling as usual, coolering as usual and then putting back on the grates to firm up after a long rest in the cooler..

Brauma 04-26-2007 05:29 AM

I foil by creature of habbit mod and I dont get the bark. Since the first time Ive done butts Ive always done them the same way and they turn out great and Im just the type that doesnt fark with whats working. Ive seen the pics of the burnt looking bark and Ive meant to try it without foiling but never have.

VitaminQ 04-26-2007 07:26 AM

Yeah, I never foil brisket or butts- at least not while cooking. I prefer not to foil and cooler for holding afterward, but my timing is not always spot-on. Bark is da bomb!

CarbonToe 04-26-2007 07:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Meat Burner (Post 385497)
I love bark! If you foil and cooler, how do you get the crispy bark? It is so good!

That's the main reason I don't use foil.

I love the Bark as well....and burnt ends........need BBQ :smile:

Puppyboy 04-26-2007 08:52 AM

Yesterday was the first time I did not foil my brisket and butt during the cook. I had real bark like never before. The bark was still crunchy after being foiled and rested in a cooler for two hours.

kickassbbq 04-26-2007 09:22 AM

You can foil at 150, cook to 180 internal, unfoil, crank the heat on your smoker and go to 195-200 internal. That will get you the Bark Back.
I don't want no stinking meat, I just want the Bark!!!!!!!!!!
Smoke On!!!!!!

Mooner 04-26-2007 09:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kickassbbq (Post 385653)
You can foil at 150, cook to 180 internal, unfoil, crank the heat on your smoker and go to 195-200 internal. That will get you the Bark Back.
I don't want no stinking meat, I just want the Bark!!!!!!!!!!
Smoke On!!!!!!

Exactly what KickAss said. IMO to really get tender competition meat you have to foil, this is really what helps break down connective tissue and collagen. When your meat gets to a certain temp, usually within 10-15 degrees of it being fully cooked just take it out of the foil and let the heat dry out the outside again. Your bark will be back!

spicewine 04-26-2007 11:07 AM

What he said!!!

backyardchef 04-26-2007 12:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BadBoysBBQ (Post 385659)
Exactly what KickAss said. IMO to really get tender competition meat you have to foil, this is really what helps break down connective tissue and collagen. When your meat gets to a certain temp, usually within 10-15 degrees of it being fully cooked just take it out of the foil and let the heat dry out the outside again. Your bark will be back!

Excellent post, Jordan. :eusa_clap

The_Kapn 04-26-2007 12:56 PM

I get really confused about bark and descriptions.
Never really sure what the descriptive terms mean to different folks. :oops:
Here is what little I think I know.

For thick bark, I use lots of rub. For less bark, I use less rub.
I have even got a "bark" on brisket using just salt/pepper/sugar for a minimalist sort of rub. That was nice.
For a bit of firmness in the bark, I add more sugar.
If I want it even firmer, I add even more sugar.
If it is "crisp" or "hard" and tough to bite--I use less sugar.

I foil when the color is right and cook till tenderness is (hopefully) correct then cooler. I take it out of the foil and slice or pull as desired.
I describe my bark as "firm" but it not "hard" or "crispy". I do not feel like I will chip a tooth eating it.
I have never produced bark I considered "Mushy". I may be just lucky.

For ribs, I have tried a lot of sugar in the rub/glaze.
That gives a shiny smooth finish that looks really good.
But, when I slice, the caramelized coating has a tendency to chip or break off and does not give a clean professional looking cut. This is especially true if I have put them back on high heat to "set the glaze"--becomes like a "hard candy" if I am not careful.

I guess it is a matter of balance.
And, there is more to it than just the sugar amount. I just focused on one piece of the puzzle. :lol:

Just my thoughts from my limited experience. :oops:

TIM

biffleg 04-26-2007 01:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kickassbbq (Post 385653)
You can foil at 150, cook to 180 internal, unfoil, crank the heat on your smoker and go to 195-200 internal.

I'll have to give this a try next time around. Thanks for sharing the tip!

thillin 04-26-2007 02:00 PM

I do them about like Kapn. Even foiling, the bark is firm and chewy. I foil when the bark sets and temps get arount 160. I really don't care for crispy bark. Even burnt ends get sauced, so they end up chewy. I usually don't sauce my "bark bites" from the pulled pork, so they're moist, chewy and ready to eat.

Ray Zorback 04-27-2007 09:11 AM

This is going to be a dumb question from an obvious newbie:
What is "Bark"?

tonto1117 04-27-2007 09:20 AM

"Bark" is the outside "crust" of the meat. It is extremly flavorful from use of slathers, rubs, mops and sprays that are used throughout the cooking process, and is highly coveted.


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