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-   -   A food scientist's 4 tips for barbecue success (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=190653)

Ron_L 06-06-2014 09:26 AM

A food scientist's 4 tips for barbecue success
 
I saw this posted on Facebook.

Interesting article...

http://www.vox.com/2014/6/1/5765070/...rbecue-success

Quote:

When it comes to barbecuing, there are all sorts of expert tips out there that people claim to be the secret to delicious, succulent meat.

Some of these tips are correct, but have to be followed in a particular way to be effective. Others are entirely wrong.

Science to the rescue. Recently, food scientist Guy Crosby looked at the chemistry of barbecue and explained how you can use scientific knowledge to maximize your barbecue success. Here are a few of his tips.

Smokeoholic 06-06-2014 09:32 AM

Yes interesting nothing new though.

Thank's for posting.:biggrin1:

daninnewjersey 06-06-2014 09:34 AM

Very interesting....except he's saying hot and fast dries out the meat faster. He appears to be a low and slow guy. Since I'm hot and fast I now don't like the article....:mrgreen::mrgreen:

Smokeoholic 06-06-2014 09:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by daninnewjersey (Post 2946442)
Very interesting....except he's saying hot and fast dries out the meat faster. He appears to be a low and slow guy. Since I'm hot and fast I now don't like the article....:mrgreen::mrgreen:

lol ^ ^ ^ ^

Untraceable 06-06-2014 09:52 AM

I thought I read alot of information claiming that marinades should be very low sodium, not high sodium? Only saying that because I did a ton of reading about marinades when preparing for a contest that had Tri tip as a category.

buccaneer 06-06-2014 09:54 AM

I love food science.
Tip 4 will ruin a steak, and should have been explained more expansively.

Fwismoker 06-06-2014 09:55 AM

Didn't read it yet but i will. H&F doesn't dry meat out though..lol Somebody should tell that too my chicken when i cook it about 500* :rolleyes:

I think H&F should be re defined to over 350*

Bamabuzzard 06-06-2014 09:56 AM

The high in sodium recommendation is something that doesn't apply to me because I don't want my rub or marinade to completely take over the taste of my meat. I like the taste of the meat I'm cooking. The seasoning or marinade is just a complement for it.

Fwismoker 06-06-2014 10:04 AM

There is, however, a trade-off in terms of temperature: the meat will lose the least amount of moisture at the low end of this range, but at the higher end, collagen (a tough type of connective tissue) gets converted to gelatin, making it much more tender. Completely converting collagen into gelatin is how you get types of barbecue that can be easily ripped apart — like pulled pork.

275-300 perfect imo for most meats.

Bamabuzzard 06-06-2014 10:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fwismoker (Post 2946482)
There is, however, a trade-off in terms of temperature: the meat will lose the least amount of moisture at the low end of this range, but at the higher end, collagen (a tough type of connective tissue) gets converted to gelatin, making it much more tender. Completely converting collagen into gelatin is how you get types of barbecue that can be easily ripped apart like pulled pork.

275-300 perfect imo for most meats.

I agree. Though my magic numbers are 250-275, those temps are great as well.

arbeck 06-06-2014 10:50 AM

Moisture loss is directly proportional to the final temperature of the product. If you cook super hot, the outside areas of the product will get to a higher temperature before the center gets to the temperature you want. Those outside areas that get to a higher temperature than the core will tend to dry out.

However, in barbecue, you are usually cooking your meats to a much higher internal temperature than a steak. Evaporative cooling actually slows the temperature of the outside while the core is coming up to temp. You simply can't get the internal temperature of the meat above the "stall" until enough moisture has evaporated unless you wrap. So, it really doesn't matter what temp you are cooking your barbecue at (within reason), because it has to get rid of the same amount of moisture before it can beat the evaporative cooling. Of course, if you wrap, you are avoiding the stall. However, the temp inside the wrap is never going to rise much above the boiling point of water; so you're cook temperature doesn't matter that much.

So to make a long story short. Hot and fast vs low and slow doesn't make much difference in meats where the target temperature is above about 175. As long as it spends enough time in the zone to render most of the collagen into gelatin, you'll be fine.

buccaneer 06-06-2014 11:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by arbeck (Post 2946550)
Moisture loss is directly proportional to the final temperature of the product. If you cook super hot, the outside areas of the product will get to a higher temperature before the center gets to the temperature you want. Those outside areas that get to a higher temperature than the core will tend to dry out.

However, in barbecue, you are usually cooking your meats to a much higher internal temperature than a steak. Evaporative cooling actually slows the temperature of the outside while the core is coming up to temp. You simply can't get the internal temperature of the meat above the "stall" until enough moisture has evaporated unless you wrap. So, it really doesn't matter what temp you are cooking your barbecue at (within reason), because it has to get rid of the same amount of moisture before it can beat the evaporative cooling. Of course, if you wrap, you are avoiding the stall. However, the temp inside the wrap is never going to rise much above the boiling point of water; so you're cook temperature doesn't matter that much.

So to make a long story short. Hot and fast vs low and slow doesn't make much difference in meats where the target temperature is above about 175. As long as it spends enough time in the zone to render most of the collagen into gelatin, you'll be fine.

I feel sorry for you, but appreciate your honesty and bravery!
:clap2:

Beliefs win over evidence.

MS2SB 06-06-2014 11:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buccaneer (Post 2946473)
I love food science.
Tip 4 will ruin a steak, and should have been explained more expansively.

Would you care to expand on this topic? So as to avoid the rest of us gullible bastidges from ruining our meats.

buccaneer 06-06-2014 11:11 AM

Quote:

I love food science.
Tip 4 will ruin a steak, and should have been explained more expansively.
Quote:

Originally Posted by MS2SB (Post 2946567)
Would you care to expand on this topic? So as to avoid the rest of us gullible bastidges from ruining our meats.

I thank you. It should have read rule 3.
That would ruin a low collagen meat.

MS2SB 06-06-2014 01:16 PM

Yes, yes it would.


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