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-   -   Lang patio firebox question (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=180347)

jonmhenderson 01-27-2014 03:06 PM

Lang patio firebox question
 
I am still investigating my first stick burner purchase. I've really been looking at firebox sizes as much as cooking chamber sizes. I want to make sure I don't end up having to buy a chainsaw to shorten the wood. Most firewood is cut into 16 inch lengths. I see where the Lang patio's firebox is 17X17. I've also watched the video where Ben builds a fire in the cooker. Is it just me, or does it seem like the wood barely fits in the firebox? The comparable Klose models have 20X20 fireboxes. It seems like the extra room would allow more oxygen to get around the fuel and make for more complete combustion. Have any Lang Brethren wished their patio model's firebox was bigger? I like the cooking chamber size.

peeps 01-27-2014 03:31 PM

I have a 24"x24"24" firebox and use ~18" (max) long splits. I would think with anything much smaller, you would need to have some cutting implements handy or a good consitent source of wood that provides you a suitable length.

bookie 01-27-2014 03:33 PM

I believe the Jambo Backyard model is 24 X24

Waterboy12 01-27-2014 05:47 PM

No complaints about the firebox size. I burn hot/small fires, no need to pack the firebox full. Most of the time I'm burning 9-10" splits. I have the means to process my wood the way I want, even if I didn't have the means I wouldn't let the "size" of commercially processed firewood dictate the cooker that I can/could/would buy.

jonmhenderson 01-27-2014 05:54 PM

Gotcha Waterboy! Good advice.

J'ville Grill 01-27-2014 06:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Waterboy12 (Post 2782079)
No complaints about the firebox size. I burn hot/small fires, no need to pack the firebox full. Most of the time I'm burning 9-10" splits. I have the means to process my wood the way I want, even if I didn't have the means I wouldn't let the "size" of commercially processed firewood dictate the cooker that I can/could/would buy.

Very well put, I'll second that.

Terry The Toad 01-27-2014 06:15 PM

Well, not to get too technical, but: a^2 + b^2 = c^2

289 + 289 = 578 ... the square root of 578 is ~24 ... so on the diagonal you could put a 24 inch piece of wood in there. Even with the grate - you could get a pretty long stick into the box.

Probably more than you wanted to know. :wink:

J'ville Grill 01-27-2014 06:17 PM

When I first got my Lang I would ask my wood mongers for small splits. Now I get larger ones and process them down with a 5 ton electric log splitter and a miter saw.

Waterboy12 01-27-2014 06:35 PM

You also need to take Into account that once you get a Lang up to temp, especially the smaller variety(36/48) it holds temp very we'll. It holds temp so we'll that trying to run in the 225* range can be more of a challenge than running at 300*. You'll start running into the issue of having a small enough fire to run those low temps. Before I learned how to build a fire in my Lang, I had full size 18" splits on hand. I soon learned that an 18" splits is a lot larger than what's needed.....just something else to think about.

J'ville Grill 01-27-2014 06:41 PM

One more thing. Around here fireplace splits are 18-20 inches in length, where as splits for cooking or wood burning stoves are 12-16 inches.

jonmhenderson 01-27-2014 07:50 PM

Pretty much all the splits around here are 16. Thanks for all the info guys! I just really don't want to have to buy a chainsaw and wood splitter. So, Waterboy, are you saying that once all that 1/4 inch steel gets hot, it stays hot? That's a good thing and would definitely be a selling point. I must say though, the $550 shipping quote was quite the shocker.

J'ville Grill 01-27-2014 08:00 PM

Once heated up it's easy to maintain temps. How far from Nahunta, Ga. are you? Maybe you could make a road trip and pick it up yourself.

unixadm 01-27-2014 08:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J'ville Grill (Post 2782116)
When I first got my Lang I would ask my wood mongers for small splits. Now I get larger ones and process them down with a 5 ton electric log splitter and a miter saw.

You got a log splitter?!? :)

jonmhenderson 01-27-2014 08:06 PM

I live near Nashville and that's a ways from south Ga. I think I'm going to see if my guy will build me one with a 24 X 24 firebox.

unixadm 01-27-2014 08:09 PM

I have experimented thanks to advice on this forum on my Lang 36 Patio. My best results thus far are running thin splits that I then cut in half with a Worx Jawsaw. I'm burning 7-8" small splits of white oak or cherry. I placed a small piece of expanded metal on the firebox grate (it covers the entire grate), then bent the back 1/3rd of the expanded metal upwards. I did this to prevent building the fire too close to the cooking chamber as recommended. I then put a shovel full of Royal Oak lump on the expanded metal on the very right side of the firebox and light it with a torch with the cooker wide open. After 5-10 minutes with the lump starting to get cherry red, I put a couple of splits on there. I then put another split or two in the firebox on the left side to preheat. At that point I close the main chamber door and leave it in the slightly open position, while leaving the firebox door partially open. Once the cooker starts drafting and approaches 225 degrees, I close the main chamber door and the firebox door. It will normally ramp up to around 250-275 degrees and I keep both dampers wide open, feeding splits to maintain the temperature desired.

I tried longer splits and the results were not as good. I get more even chamber temps, less smoke and a much cleaner fire. You don't need a huge fire to keep the patio models at temperature. You may tend the fire a bit more with smaller half splits, but I'll take that. It also allows me to rotate through different wood more quickly.


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