The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS.

The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS. (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/index.php)
-   Competition BBQ (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=15)
-   -   When do you switch from amateur to professional? (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=179716)

bassandbeer 01-19-2014 02:04 PM

When do you switch from amateur to professional?
 
Over the past two years, I've been in 3 amateur comps. First one was a learning experience (DAL in ribs), but the two last summer went well. One comp was first in brisket, 4th in ribs (out of eight teams). Second comp was first in chicken, 9th in ribs ( out of 18 ).

I have a friend in the pros that tells me it's time to move up. What was your determining factor in going into the professional comps?

NRA4Life 01-19-2014 02:11 PM

Never did any amateur comps, just jumped right in right from the start.

ShencoSmoke 01-19-2014 02:19 PM

Go for it.

buttburnersbbq 01-19-2014 02:42 PM

We did the back yard division for 2 years. Around here there usually only 2 categories in back yard ( butts and ribs ). The third year we were bumped up at our local town BBQ comp since they did not have enough pro teams. Now we had to cook all 4 categories ( butts,ribs,chicken and brisket). We have never looked back. Had a blast in the pro division and won some trophies. I like the 4 categories since there is no down time and you are always doing something. Just make sure you practice and have your times down. We have a spread sheet so we know what we are doing every hour.

cpw 01-19-2014 02:55 PM

We did a few non sanctioned neighborhood comps when we started, but that was more for fun than anything. As soon as we decided to do a real sanctioned comp, it was the full deal...no backyard contest at this event.

bassandbeer 01-19-2014 03:11 PM

I have a small Bar-B-Chef that barely holds 2 racks of ribs, or 2 butts, or maybe 2 briskets. I don't have a lot of money to spend on another rig. Maybe I can find a friend with another one, otherwise, there's no way to cook it all in the time frame. Thoughts?

poorolddan 01-19-2014 03:56 PM

You are looking at one of he big differences between amateur and pro cooking. MONEY!
This is not an inexpensive sport by any means. If you can't afford more cooking space you sure can't afford the higher entry fees and meat costs. You may want to wait until you have more resources or have saved up a few thousand dollars. Just one entry fee is more expensive than an additional cheap cooker.

bassandbeer 01-19-2014 04:03 PM

True. Our local comps run around $250. Backyards typically $50-$100. I have the money, just need to convince the wife of the NEED to spend more and go pro. I'm looking forward to it.

Dex 01-19-2014 04:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NRA4Life (Post 2771059)
Never did any amateur comps, just jumped right in right from the start.

Same here.

Only one way to find out how your BBQ stands up to those in the professional series.

Lake Dogs 01-19-2014 04:20 PM

amateur to pro? the day you quit your day job because the profit is so significant you can no longer afford to accept the little $$$ you get in your day job. :-)

I/we've competed in a few unsanctioned comps and still do; we enjoy them for the comradere and like the sponsors and organizers of those. Otherwise, if competing, I never saw any benefit in competing against anyone other than the very best. To me, why else compete? Mind you, that's me. That way, if you win, you really win, and if you dont, you have your *** handed to you by those who know how to do it.

I remember a few years back the guys who usually compete in KCBS came over to a GA BBQ event. I remember them whining at the end; they did no better than 30th of the 52 teams. They said "I heard it was supposed to be much easier and not much competition". I asked them "if so, why would you bother entering?". Anyway, my point is if you want to win, you'll have to earn it. Might as well earn it against the best (whatever you perceive the best is).

Why compete in Backyard? Seriously. I've read answer to this very question like:

I want to learn. Seriously, what are you learning in Backyard that you cannot learn in the real competition? Worse, what you learn in Backyard may not be applicable in the real deal.

IF, and I mean IF you have your children cooking the whole thing and you'd like to give them an opportunity to walk, and only if you feel strongly they have no chance in hades of walking otherwise, I might understand... However, there are no Pro's in the "Pro's". There are just competitors. Some are very accomplished, others aren't. However, most all can cook!!

Alexa RnQ 01-19-2014 04:43 PM

We started in regular contests from the get-go. But I would say if you've hit firsts in a couple of categories, it's time to move up.

Untraceable 01-19-2014 04:46 PM

If you have to ask that question, your ready for pro. When I think amateur, I think of the guy or kid with a COS or weber grill that thinks they are pretty dang good cooks. And there is nothing to say they are not. But if you roll into a backyard comp with a 4k dollar pit and a trailer with networks set up for wifi, your exceeded the contests intentions.

Just my opinion. No one likes sandbaggers

CBQ 01-19-2014 05:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Untraceable (Post 2771297)
If you have to ask that question, your ready for pro. When I think amateur, I think of the guy or kid with a COS or weber grill that thinks they are pretty dang good cooks.

Yup. That fact that you are reading this forum and asking questions is by itself an indication you are probably ready for pro.

As far getting your wife to buy in - well, it's a hobby. You can win more at sanctioned contests, but it costs more to compete too. We consider it a good year if we break even, and we are a top 100 KCBS team. A few elite teams earn a living at this, the vast majority do not. People do it because they love it.

K-Train 01-19-2014 06:10 PM

Only one way to find out………

Fat Freddy 01-19-2014 06:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bassandbeer (Post 2771124)
I have a small Bar-B-Chef that barely holds 2 racks of ribs, or 2 butts, or maybe 2 briskets. I don't have a lot of money to spend on another rig. Maybe I can find a friend with another one, otherwise, there's no way to cook it all in the time frame. Thoughts?

I dont do it but an entire contest CAN be cooked on a single WSM.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:04 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
2003 -2012 © BBQ-Brethren Inc. All rights reserved. All Content and Flaming Pig Logo are registered and protected under U.S and International Copyright and Trademarks. Content Within this Website Is Property of BBQ Brethren Inc. Reproduction or alteration is strictly prohibited.