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-   -   Knives, a confusing conundrum (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=179587)

Chopper Duke 01-17-2014 04:02 PM

Knives, a confusing conundrum
 
So I've decided I want, no, need at least one knife that wants purchased at the same place you can get your oil changed, pick up a pair of cheap jeans, a new TV and groceries. Yeah, you all know where I'm talking about.

So, I set myself a $50 limit, did a LOT of reading here and other place and the Victorinox seems to be a leading contender, especially for the price. I attend art school and asked a few of the culinary students what knives they use and the consensus was that most use what ever they get in their "kit" and wait until they graduate before getting anything decent it also appears the kits have changed based on whatever is cheapest for the school to get.

For usage, I smoke mostly butts and ribs (spare, St. Louis and baby back) but I also like to prepare some of my meals with fresh peppers and onions so I'd like something that can also cut through the larger peppers with ease. As far as grilling, I do chicken, burgers, steaks, hot dogs, the general grilling items as well as corn and veggies.

Then, The other day I decided to stop by Bed, Bath and Beyond the other day since it was on my way Home from school. I went to their cutlery section to put my grubby paws on some. No Victorinox, but they did have Calphalon, Wüstof and J.A. Henckels. After Handling them, I quickly ruled the Calphalon out. I really like the Henckels and as I was explaining to the nice young man who worked there, he suggested a Santoku over the 8" chefs. I gotta admit that I like the way it felt in my hand.

So, if you're still with me, based on what I stated my intended uses are I have a couple of questions:
Would a Chefs be better than a Santoku for the kind of cutting I need to do?
Is the quality and longevity of the Henckles enough to justify the price difference in comparison to the Victorinox?

ButtBurner 01-17-2014 04:08 PM

I just got a knife set for christmas and it has one of those Sankou or whatever you call it knife in it

Its ok, but I much prefer the rocking motion of my trusty old chefs knife.

Offthehook 01-17-2014 04:10 PM

I have often heard that if you only have 1 single knife, the 8 inch chefs knife is the one... with that being said, I have many.

buccaneer 01-17-2014 04:13 PM

Santoku is an excellent all rounder, designed for that purpose, basically for the housewives of Japan.
It will do vegetables with ease and the meat jobs.
Personally I would go with a chefs 8" or 10 " myself, because it can do most anything and you will gain your skill levels with it.
HenCkels make some high end quality knives, but I don't know which level you have looked at or the price, so I don't know if you could buy better for your buck.

I will say, when it comes to knives, it is ALWAYS worth spending to get a higher quality.
It saves you money, you have a more pleasurable life and care for them and you will be passing them down .
By cheap, replace. Repeat.

Whistler 01-17-2014 04:15 PM

I like my Henckels Chef knife and use it almost as much as the utility but the Granton edge on the Santoku is nice for slicing veggies. I ended up going for the drop forged models and love the edge they hold.

kevinc 01-17-2014 04:18 PM

Get the Victorinox 8" Chefs knife and the Victorinox boning knife as well.

The boning knife is razor sharp and is really useful for trimming up pork butts given the size, flexibility and sharpness of the blade.

The chefs knife relatively inexpensive, holds its edge really well and the nonslip handle is great when your hands are messy.

Al Czervik 01-17-2014 04:22 PM

For $50 you could get both the Victorinox chef knife and a 5" or 6" boning knife... I have both (plus a 12" cimeter) and they all serve me well. I have also noted a number of posts in "knife" threads from professional butchers about Victorinox blades and how much they like them considering how much they use them on a daily basis. :thumb:

Al Czervik 01-17-2014 04:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kevinc (Post 2769094)
Get the Victorinox 8" Chefs knife and the Victorinox boning knife as well.

The boning knife is razor sharp and is really useful for trimming up pork butts given the size, flexibility and sharpness of the blade.

The chefs knife relatively inexpensive, holds its edge really well and the nonslip handle is great when your hands are messy.

Yeah... What kevin said while I was in the middle composing my opinion. :mrgreen:

Chopper Duke 01-17-2014 04:24 PM

I appreciate every response. I am one of those of the mindset; buy once, cry once so I don't mind spending the $$ on a Henckles but if the advantage isn't there to spend the extra, I'd rather not.

Bludawg 01-17-2014 04:24 PM

I have a Victornox 6" semi stiff boning knife, my most reached for is a Messiermeister 7 " santoku and a 5" utility.

93vpmod 01-17-2014 04:32 PM

Knive
 
http://www.cutleryandmore.com/hencke...-knife-p125202

I purchased this six inch for 72.00 at bed bath and beyond. Nice knife, with good balance for me.

Offthehook 01-17-2014 04:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chopper Duke (Post 2769103)
I appreciate every response. I am one of those of the mindset; buy once, cry once so I don't mind spending the $$ on a Henckles but if the advantage isn't there to spend the extra, I'd rather not.

Victorinox and Dexter are good quality, lower price point. Then you get into the middle of the road about 100$ henkle range. If you go nuts like me you will have a collection of Shuns $200-450

kevinc 01-17-2014 04:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chopper Duke (Post 2769103)
I appreciate every response. I am one of those of the mindset; buy once, cry once so I don't mind spending the $$ on a Henckles but if the advantage isn't there to spend the extra, I'd rather not.

If it helps, Cooks Illustrated has done multiple tests over the years and the Victorinox always come out on top over the pricier brands.

From their most recent test:

During the past 20 years, we’ve conducted five chef’s knife evaluations. Those tests have covered dozens of blades in styles ranging from traditional, to innovative, to hybrid knives combining Western and Asian features. And at the end of every test, we’ve told the same story: One bargain knife has typically trounced the competition—including knives costing 10 times its price tag.

....

About the winner of the tests (the Victorinox Chefs knife)

Still the best—and a bargain—after 20 years, this knife’s “super-sharp” blade was “silent” and “smooth,” even as it cut through tough squash, and it retained its edge after weeks of testing. Its textured grip felt secure for a wide range of hand sizes, and thanks to its gently rounded edges and the soft, hand-polished top spine, we could comfortably choke up on the knife for “precise,” “effortless” cuts.

IamMadMan 01-17-2014 04:34 PM

I agree with the quality of J. A. Henckels, if you don't want to spend that much, try a Wustof..

If you have a Restaurant Equippers store you can get Henckels Wustof Knives..

J.A. Henckels

Wustof Knives

quamdar 01-17-2014 04:44 PM

Maybe I'm missing out but I always just use the cheap white handled knives you get at Sam's. They're so cheap I just use them like they're disposable lol


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