The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS.

The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS. (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/index.php)
-   Q-talk (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=5)
-   -   DO tell! (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=178556)

Mugsterdad 01-02-2014 10:59 AM

DO tell!
 
I've never cooked with a dutch oven before, but always wanted to try it. I received a porcelain coated Lodge for Christmas. I have a couple questions. How often, and for what do you guys use yours for? Is there a preference between porcelain coated and raw cast iron? She did say I could exchange it if I wanted the uncoated one. Thoughts?

Smoothsmoke 01-02-2014 11:10 AM

I use mine all the time. Soups, cioppino, chili.

Bludawg 01-02-2014 11:11 AM

I cook all sorts of stuff in mine but it's black iron with feet and I use coals the one you have is more for the stove top or the oven. Cobblers beans fried chicken deep frin anything Biscuits, Bread, soups stews, pot raost......

Dauvis 01-02-2014 11:54 AM

I think it depends on how you intend to use it. IMHO, the black cast iron ones are best for outdoor uses (over the campfire or resting in coals) and the enamel ones are best for indoor stove/oven uses.

IlliniQ 01-02-2014 12:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dauvis (Post 2751216)
I think it depends on how you intend to use it. IMHO, the black cast iron ones are best for outdoor uses (over the campfire or resting in coals) and the enamel ones are best for indoor stove/oven uses.

I agree with this for sure. I use my enamel coated one inside all the time. It's especially useful for dishes where you want to get a good sear over the burner and then finish it in the oven without transferring pots and losing all the tasty bits in the pan from the searing.

I like to do chicken thighs in mine - I can get a good sear on the skin, and then finish it off in the oven with some garlic, onions and tomatoes (or anything, really) tossed over the top.

Here's an example from my family-friendly cooking blog:
http://eatsforallages.com/2013/09/10...-oven-chicken/
(If posting this link is against the rules, I apologize, and I will remove the link - the blog is completely non-commercial and makes no revenue of any kind, though. Just a hobby)

I don't have an uncoated one, myself, but I think I'd get one if I planned to use it outdoors...

Mugsterdad 01-02-2014 01:07 PM

I've seen them in some throwdown cook threads. I intend on using it mostly on my BGE for soups, stews, braising, searing, etc...

Smith's Pig Pen 01-02-2014 01:19 PM

Yea- that one's nice and light. Use the porcelain inside and get a cast for outside. what to make?.. We do gumbo, jambalaya, chilis, cioppino, Brunswick stew, linguini and clams... I could go on and on. They are great. Enjoy

Tricky 01-02-2014 01:36 PM

The straight cast iron ones are best for camping (particularly the ones with feet that keep it up off the charcoal). You can make a simple fruit cobbler when camping. Make sure to season the dutch oven first (google it - you can do it in your oven or in a BBQ; it gets smoky).

Once you've seasoned your DO:

Dump one 1 yellow cake mix into the bottom of the DO.

Pour on 1 large can fruit pie filling (peach, cherry, apple, etc.) or even canned/bottled fruit and the juice.

Pour a can of Sprite over the whole thing. Do not mix.

You can google the right # of briquettes to use (i.e. for a 12" oven, use 10 briquettes on the bottom and 14 on the top).

Makes a nice little cobbler - add whipped cream and enjoy!

57borntorun 01-02-2014 02:06 PM

Cast iron houses bacteria and potential off flavors when liquids are introduced and porcelain not.

popeye 01-02-2014 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 57borntorun (Post 2751325)
Cast iron houses bacteria and potential off flavors when liquids are introduced and porcelain not.

you are so full of it .

BobBrisket 01-02-2014 03:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 57borntorun (Post 2751325)
Cast iron houses bacteria and potential off flavors when liquids are introduced and porcelain not.

There is a bit of truth here. If you store regular CI make sure to leave the lids cracked open. If too much oil is left behind, it can turn rancid and make for off flavors and smells. If I haven't used em in a while, I heat em up and give em a good wipe down and re oil or even fill with water and boil off the old oil. I keep em stored in the garage with a bit of newspaper rolled up to keep the lid cracked open and air flowing. My skillet stays in the house in the oven and gets used enough that I don't worry about the oil coating. Good quality CI shouldn't be porous and once a seal has been formed it's as good if not better than any non stick stuff out there. Just what I've read and experienced over the years with my CI.

Edit--just as with anything, there is very cheaply made and cast CI out there. I have seen some that actually was "pitted" and had hairline cracks, stay clear of that stuff. Not worth the money or the effort to season and use for generations to come. Pay for the good stuff, only cry once and know that you will be giving it to your kids and their kids and so on one day. :wink:
http://papadutch.home.comcast.net/~papadutch/

popeye 01-02-2014 03:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bobbrisket (Post 2751369)
there is a bit of truth here. If you store regular ci make sure to leave the lids cracked open. If too much oil is left behind, it can turn rancid and make for off flavors and smells. If i haven't used em in a while, i heat em up and give em a good wipe down and re oil or even fill with water and boil off the old oil. I keep em stored in the garage with a bit of newspaper rolled up to keep the lid cracked open and air flowing. My skillet stays in the house in the oven and gets used enough that i don't worry about the oil coating. Good quality ci shouldn't be porous and once a seal has been formed it's as good if not better than any non stick stuff out there. Just what i've read and experienced over the years with my ci.

what he said

57borntorun 01-02-2014 03:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by popeye (Post 2751391)
what he said

So which is it, am I full of it or not?

John Bowen 01-02-2014 03:38 PM

I use my porcelain primarily inside for stews and small roasts. I use the straight cast iron inside and out for pretty much everything except fried eggs – don’t ask me why I really don’t have a good answer.
I have one 8” skillet that I only use for cornbread.

shares 01-02-2014 03:43 PM

As noted the porcelain dutch ovens are for indoor use. The bare cast iron ones for use with charcoal are called Camp dutch oven, and are stackable.

For each size camp dutch oven there are charts that show how many briquettes to place on the lid and underneath to obtain a specific temperature.

You can also hang them over a camp fire chuckwagon style.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:52 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise v2.6.0 Beta 4 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
2003 -2012 BBQ-Brethren Inc. All rights reserved. All Content and Flaming Pig Logo are registered and protected under U.S and International Copyright and Trademarks. Content Within this Website Is Property of BBQ Brethren Inc. Reproduction or alteration is strictly prohibited.