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CyberQue 11-09-2013 04:29 PM

A question about steak
 
I've always assumed that steak grades were based on the amount of fat marbling. Is there more to the story?

The reason I ask is because I bought a big ribeye roast the other day and it had great fat marbling throughout. I could've spent an extra $2.00 per pound for an Angus roast, but it didn't seem necessary.

I cut the roast into a dozen BEAUTIFUL looking steaks. But I've cooked four of them so far and every single one has been tough. Not gristly... just... not tender... sort of hard to chew.

Any ideas what's going on? Do I need to smoke these suckers like brisket? (I normally sear my steaks over very high heat until they are medium rare, but I'm willing to try something new. Either that or the damn dog is going to eat like a king for the next few months...)

buccaneer 11-09-2013 04:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CyberQue (Post 2687032)
I've always assumed that steak grades were based on the amount of fat marbling. Is there more to the story?

The reason I ask is because I bought a big ribeye roast the other day and it had great fat marbling throughout. I could've spent an extra $2.00 per pound for an Angus roast, but it didn't seem necessary.

I cut the roast into a dozen BEAUTIFUL looking steaks. But I've cooked four of them so far and every single one has been tough. Not gristly... just... not tender... sort of hard to chew.

Any ideas what's going on? Do I need to smoke these suckers like brisket? (I normally sear my steaks over very high heat until they are medium rare, but I'm willing to try something new. Either that or the damn dog is going to eat like a king for the next few months...)

The reaction of the animal prior to death can dramatically change the quality of the meat for eating.
If the animal is panicked it releases compounds that changes the blood chemistry and hence the muscles.

I'd slice them thinly and use it for stir fries or shabu shabu, Pho,...although that might not be an option for yourself?

Diesel Dave 11-09-2013 04:57 PM

I totally agree with buccaneer on this.
You could try to do a reverse sear and see if that helps some.
Good luck

didisea 11-09-2013 05:01 PM

What grade was the roast? Rib eye by nature of the cut has lots of fat, but if it was a select grade roast, it will not be that tender.

Not sure how or at what temp you are cooking them, but you might try the reverse sear method. Cook them at about 350 deg. - not 500 deg. and see if that doesn't improve the chewiness of the steak. You could also try "needling" the steak using a needler, since many retailers are doing this to steak now.

Fwismoker 11-09-2013 05:02 PM

I'm assuming you cut it against the grain (extremely important)...that said do a slow reverse sear


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