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-   -   Ribs in 2 Hours? (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=173470)

bbqmike_ny 10-18-2013 06:57 PM

Ribs in 2 Hours?
 
A friend of mine follows a recipe in the webber app, they say to do offset cooking @300dg for 1.5-2hrs, he usually does baybacks, and says they come out good. (I tried them once, and they were tender). My last cook took over 4 and I figure I averaged about 280, at 2 hrs I wasn't anywhere near done. My theory is, based on his description of his fire (kettle with one chimney split on each side with the racks in the middle) that he's running hotter, maybe in the 350 range. What would the guidelines be for time vs temp, is a 50dg change enough to take off 1.5-2 hours?

Fwismoker 10-18-2013 07:03 PM

I do spare ribs all the time in 3 hours at about 250 and could speed that up with hotter temps. My beef ribs last night were done in 2 @ 250

Fwismoker 10-18-2013 07:12 PM

Mike you're using a offset and he's using a kettle? Anyways meats cook faster when they're getting a direct type of heat vs an indirect type of heat at the same temp. You can stand in 90 in the shade and get no sunburn but stand in direct light at 90 and you will.

Pyle's BBQ 10-18-2013 07:12 PM

I cook ribs on my Akorn for the restaurant in about 1.5 -2 hours. I usually run at 275-300. The smaller ones take less time. When I get the 3# slabs, those will take a little longer.

DriverWild 10-18-2013 07:27 PM

Just curious, why the hurry? I find that pushing higher heat limits creates a drier product since the meat tightens up faster which pushes out moisture . Fat doesn't render the same way. I'm moving back closer to the L&S methods that made me fall in love with BBQ in the first place. Just my 2 cents on the subject.

Garrett 10-18-2013 07:34 PM

Here's a thread from a few weeks ago I did. The results were very good!!

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=173083

landarc 10-18-2013 07:50 PM

You say baby backs, at 300°F, baby backs, especially the standard thickness ones can be done in 2 hours or so. Depending on how he is measuring, he could easily be at 325F, which, even that 25°F difference can be a big difference in time.

To answer the question of why the hurry, surely, it isn't always necessary to cook hotter and such. But, at times, you just don't have time, and really want ribs, or you have mistimed other things, and need to get things done. To some degree, the more tools and experience you have, the better the cook you are when things go wrong.

As for meat drying out, that is not so much a fact, there is evidence that there is a happy medium. Some classically trained cooks believe very strongly that for most cuts, hotter is better.

Zin 10-18-2013 08:05 PM

A true BB rib is 1lb or less, any rib over a 1lb is a loin back.

bbqmike_ny 10-18-2013 08:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fwismoker (Post 2663184)
Mike you're using a offset and he's using a kettle? Anyways meats cook faster when they're getting a direct type of heat vs an indirect type of heat at the same temp. You can stand in 90 in the shade and get no sunburn but stand in direct light at 90 and you will.

Both on Kettles, at the moment I only build a fire one side, vs his split method (I also only need 1/2 a chimney vs his full to start).

bbqmike_ny 10-21-2013 09:20 AM

Thanks for the feedback, I'm going to do my own test and see if I can 'get em done' quick as well, really the only point to be to be able to make them for dinner on a week night.

Hal4UK 10-21-2013 09:50 AM

These days, the term "Baby Back" is used pretty loosely. Although not technically correct, people are often calling any size loin back a baby back.

Even with a true baby back, 2 hours sounds a little fast, but maybe not (we always do the larger loin backs).

Also, as someone else mentioned, you can cook (any) ribs pretty hot and they will still come out moist as long as you pull them out in time. You can dry them out just as easy at 225 if you leave them in too long.

Most folks have better luck (we do) cooking ribs hot. I've seen ribs cooked too low that eventually dried out before they ever got "bendy". At 275+, they will almost always come out "happy" and "bendy". Just have to pull and serve (or pull and move to holding temps) at the right time.

bbqmike_ny 10-21-2013 11:05 AM

I actually just found the recipe he uses, out of the Weber app, and it actually says indirect at 350-400 for 1.5-2 hours, which to me, makes sense.

Good tips on the high temp cooking, it makes sense, you can get to the same point, but your window to pull it off at the right time is going to be smaller.

Bbq Bubba 10-21-2013 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zin (Post 2663230)
A true BB rib is 1lb or less, any rib over a 1lb is a loin back.

Actually its 1 1/4 lb or under to be called a Babyback.


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