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-   -   Brisket noob. Worried about cook time. Using iq120 (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=166357)

cbl600r 07-20-2013 01:28 AM

Brisket noob. Worried about cook time. Using iq120
 
Hey I got A 13.6 lbs packer. Cooking on kamado with a pitmaster iq120. Set it to 225* and planing to eat at 7pm tomorrow (18hrs till eaten time). Planing on wrapping with butcher paper at 165. When is your guess that it will be tender as butter and ready to rest?

Also, started about 30 mins ago and the the brisket is already reading 91*. The temp has been riding high at 240-260

http://i1321.photobucket.com/albums/...ps02ac820a.jpg

cbl600r 07-20-2013 02:35 AM

A anyone watered their kamado? Because I just did... Used a water hose to cool down the ceramics. It cooled Down.. Just a lot slower than I wanted. Which is a good thing! They hold the heat well! I over shot my temp. Rookie mistake...never again

cbl600r 07-20-2013 02:37 AM

Brisket at 125* and kamado finally down to 225*. Maybe I can go to bed now! 2:30 am here I. The great state of Texas

ssv3 07-20-2013 02:43 AM

Mistake two. I wouldn't do the watering of the kamado again if I were you. You're running the risk of cracking your kamado(thermal shock). Hot ceramics and sudden cold water is a no no in my book and a recipe for disaster.

cbl600r 07-20-2013 03:21 AM

Yeah didnt think it was cold enough to shock it. July in Texas, the water is not "cold" at all. But you have a good point... Luckily it didn't crack it. Watering will never happen again because with will never let it get as hot as I did before I put the "stoker" on.

BB-Kuhn 07-20-2013 06:01 AM

At 225, you can see packers take 1.5hrs per pound, I think you are in the ballpark for timing.

Wolfpack 07-20-2013 06:04 AM

Early is better- you can FTC the brisket for hours and I think the longer rest will help your overall product.

El Ropo 07-20-2013 09:13 AM

260 *was a great temp for cooking. You should of left it there. Better to be 4 hours early and let the meat rest till ready to serve.

jimstocks53 07-20-2013 11:41 AM

Thermal shock does not mean cold water - just cold relative to the heat of the glass (ceramic). You were lucky.

But I have also overshot on my Primo and it is a B. I think I just used too many starters in the lump. My PartyQ controls a fan but even with the fan not running because the temp is too high there is still a wide open intake of air through the fan unit. I had to take off the PartyQ and squeeze closed the vent manually to tamp down the fire.

cbl600r 07-20-2013 06:59 PM

It come off at about 13.5 hours. Most of the it was at 200* probed butter.

http://i1321.photobucket.com/albums/...ps4631e998.jpg

Pole D 07-20-2013 07:47 PM

Glad it worked out for you.

Next time try fat down at 300 for 4 hours, wrap in butcher paper and back on for 1.5-2 more hours fat up. You won't have to worry about sleep.

By the way I got that from bludawg so I don't want to take credit. I've done it twice and its come out great each time.

ncBBQtx 06-16-2014 10:52 AM

Had a similar question. Just did a 16# packer brisket this weekend on my Primo XL Ceramic.
Low and slow---220-245 for the whole cook.


Still trying to get a sense of the timing. I left plenty of time (had problems with cutting it too close in past) and i've seen a number of different "rules of thumb," the two leading inputs were

1) 1.5-2 hrs per pound
2) 1-1.25 hrs per pound

After trimming, my brisket was closer to 13#; I decided to split the difference and left myself 20-21 hrs (1.5 hrs/lb * 13 lbs = 20 hrs) before the guests arrived. NO wrap during cooking. Paper wrap for resting. Injected with about 8 oz.

As it turns out, I pulled the brisket off at 11 hrs at 198 in the point, 201 in the flat. Wrapped in paper and rested in a cooler with a blanket for 8 hours before serving.
When i did serve it, it was fabulous, though i think a little over-rested. But still warm, great bark, and delicious, and for a displaced Texan in Maryland, it was the best taste of Texas I've had in a while. Very happy with the results.

But this leaves me with one important take away, and one big question:

1) Resting is critical to the process, and as it turns out an extended rest period is not the worst thing in the world; prior to this cook I would have been very uncomfortable resting it for 8 hours. So from here out I'm planning to pull it off earlier, rather than later. This takes a lot of anxiety out of the process.

2) 11 hrs for a 13# brisket is closer to 3/4 (.8) hr/lb--Nearly half of what the first rule of thumb would calculate and still in the ballpark of 6 hrs earlier than the second. So why so quick? I was absolutely on top of the temperature, and maintained a stable 216ish for the majority of the cook with one short excursion to 245 max, but brought it back to 225 within about half an hour. Never went back up again. I did not wrap in the cooker at all--only after pulling it off the smoker

So I guess my question is whether others are seeing quicker cook times on ceramics? What rule of thumb do you use?

baskinrobbin 06-16-2014 11:23 AM

Just did a 15# brisket on my Kamado this weekend at 225-250F, used a big pan of water under the brisket and it went all the way to 210 before it was ready. Took 14 hours. I didn't wrap either, but after 8 hours put a foil base down and poured abbey ale so the bottom didn't dry out. (best one I've done yet)

When I didn't use the water with a 12# brisket, it could be done in 8 hours, my cooking temp however was 250-275F. Just couldn't keep it steady at 225

Redleg71 06-16-2014 12:41 PM

I to did a brisket this weekend on my egg. 7# and it took about 10 hours. Like most of you I have made many a brisket and through trial and error are coming up with methods that I believe give the best results.

Although there has been considerable scientific discussion these forums disproving the use of a water pan inside a kamado style cooker I am convinced otherwise.

I placed a water pan on my plate setter and cooked my brisket to just over 180 (childrens and relatives were getting hungry and couldnt wait any longer). I let it rest for 10 minutes and then served. It was fantastic and was tender and moist. One of my better briskets for sure!

Enrico Brandizzi 06-16-2014 02:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Redleg71 (Post 2957913)
I to did a brisket this weekend on my egg. 7# and it took about 10 hours. Like most of you I have made many a brisket and through trial and error are coming up with methods that I believe give the best results.

Although there has been considerable scientific discussion these forums disproving the use of a water pan inside a kamado style cooker I am convinced otherwise.

I placed a water pan on my plate setter and cooked my brisket to just over 180 (childrens and relatives were getting hungry and couldnt wait any longer). I let it rest for 10 minutes and then served. It was fantastic and was tender and moist. One of my better briskets for sure!

I need pics!!!!!!


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