The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS.

The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS. (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/index.php)
-   Q-talk (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=5)
-   -   are there any homemade mayo experts on the forum? (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=165714)

deepsouth 07-12-2013 01:34 PM

are there any homemade mayo experts on the forum?
 
so, i don't eat mayo unless i make it, which isn't a problem as it takes almost no time to make it from scratch, but i have run into consistency problems with it. it's never too thin, but it's not always the consistency i'd like it.

this weekend, i'm looking to make a base mayo and then several variations from that, jalapeno, bbq, garlic and finally a spicy one using either garlic chili or sriracha.

for this project, i'm wanting a nice thick (and fluffy) mayo as the base since the other components will thin it down.

my usual ingredients in this type of mayo is...

vegetable oil
lime juice
rice wine vinegar
salt
sugar


my questions are.....

for a thick and fluffy mayo, should i used whole egg or just the egg whites (or does this have no bearing on thickness)?

does the acid from the lime and vinegar have anything to do with the thickness of the finished product and if so, does more or less thicken it?

any tips would be appreciated.

thanks in advance.

bbqgeekess 07-12-2013 01:36 PM

I use just egg yolks.

I use vinegar in mine because the acidity is more concentrated than lemon juice, yielding less watery mayo. I've never tried it but a stronger more concentrated vinegar might even be better.

If you want some mustard in the mayo, use very finely ground mustard powder instead of ballpark mustard.

Btw, you can repair a broken mayo easily by taking a small amount of storebought mayo, put it in a container and start working your broken mayo into it ( a little trick I learned from James Peterson book).

deepsouth 07-12-2013 01:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bbqgeekess (Post 2549105)
I use just egg yolks.

I use vinegar in mine because the acidity is more concentrated than lemon juice, yielding less watery mayo. I've never tried it but a stronger more concentrated vinegar might even be better.

If you want some mustard in the mayo, use very finely ground mustard powder instead of ballpark mustard.

Btw, you can repair a broken mayo easily by taking a small amount of storebought mayo, put it in a container and start working your broken mayo into it ( a little trick I learned from James Peterson book).

try as i might, i have never been able to break mayo, thankfully.

more acid = less watery? am i reading that right?

bbqgeekess 07-12-2013 01:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deepsouth (Post 2549116)
try as i might, i have never been able to break mayo, thankfully.

more acid = less watery? am i reading that right?

I find that if I use a more concentrated acid (say vinegar compared to lemon juice for example), i get a thicker mayo. To get the same amount of desirable tang in your mayo you'd have to use plenty more lemon juice than you would vinegar, therefore a thinner mayo.

Brother Matt 07-12-2013 01:58 PM

The acid is there to help with keeping everything emulsified. You can do away with it if you emulsify carefully, and will get a creamier end product. Also, the oil matters. Try making a batch without any citrus or vinegar, and then try a couple different oils. You'll find one that works for you, I'm sure.

As for yolks/whites, I use both just because I want to use the whole egg, but I've had good creamy mayos made with just whites, so that may be something to try as well.

PatAttack 07-12-2013 01:59 PM

Jason, just buy Duke's and quit tryin' to be all fancy!:caked::laugh:

deepsouth 07-12-2013 02:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PatAttack (Post 2549124)
Jason, just buy Duke's and quit tryin' to be all fancy!:caked::laugh:

LOL. i don't think we get that down here pat. plus, i don't roll like that!

Garrett 07-12-2013 02:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PatAttack (Post 2549124)
Jason, just buy Duke's and quit tryin' to be all fancy!:caked::laugh:

I don't eat plain mayo, but when using it in recipes and cooking with it, Dukes is the ONLY way to go!!!!



I've often thought about making some homemade to see I would like it.

CharredApron 07-12-2013 02:09 PM

I use whole eggs, fresh squeezed lemon juice, evoo, and salt. Just like granny taught me. I make my own because Dukes adds Sugar! :cry:

Crimson 07-12-2013 02:11 PM

I use hard boiled egg yokes and one raw yoke for my potato salad.
3 hard-boiled egg yolks, still warm
1 raw egg yolk
1 tablespoon white vinegar
1 cup vegetable oil
In a large mixing bowl, mash the cooked yolks very well with a fork. Add the raw yolk and vinegar and beat with a metal whisk or large spoon for a few seconds until very creamy. Gradually add the oil in a thin steady stream, whisking constantly or stirring briskly and mak­ing sure all the oil is incorporated before adding more. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes before serving.

deepsouth 07-12-2013 02:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Garrett (Post 2549137)
I don't eat plain mayo, but when using it in recipes and cooking with it, Dukes is the ONLY way to go!!!!



I've often thought about making some homemade to see I would like it.


you should try it! with a hand mixer, it takes me about two minutes from start to finish.

also, i don't heat store bought mayo either, never have. but i needed it for things i did like, so i started making my own...

Bludawg 07-12-2013 02:31 PM

I use the whole Egg in mine it make it lighter/fluffier 1large egg = 2 yokes in any mayo recipe.
I make mine in a Blender I blend the egg with the Acid of choice and other ingredients on high then drop to low and stream slowly at first a few drops at a time up to a thin stream. if it is to thick thin it with a little water.

1MoreFord 07-12-2013 08:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hometruckin (Post 2549138)
I use whole eggs, fresh squeezed lemon juice, evoo, and salt. Just like granny taught me. I make my own because Dukes adds Sugar! :cry:

I think you might want to go do a little fact checkin'.

landarc 07-12-2013 08:44 PM

I use whole egg, because it is easier and I don't have a half an egg. I also use vinegar, unless I want lemon as a flavor. Vinegar just means less liquid for the same amount of acidity. You COULD use an emulsifier, such as powdered mustard, some type of gum. etc...but, that is adding stuff just for texture. If I want to add lemon, I will grate some zest and muddle that into the vinegar. It takes on the lemon aroma without adding water. Excess liquid will be your problem.

Commercial mayonnaise makers use things such as guar gum and xanthan gum to aid in keeping the texture dense and emulsified. They also use a commercial vinegar or commercial lemon extract, which is much more concentrated than household vinegar or real lemon juice.

chicagokp 07-12-2013 09:00 PM

I always use the Alton Brown recipe as my base and go from there.



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:49 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
2003 -2012 BBQ-Brethren Inc. All rights reserved. All Content and Flaming Pig Logo are registered and protected under U.S and International Copyright and Trademarks. Content Within this Website Is Property of BBQ Brethren Inc. Reproduction or alteration is strictly prohibited.