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gotbags-10 07-02-2013 06:29 AM

Cooking flat only
 
So I have only cooked a flat only once and it turned out pretty dry so I've stuck to just packers but I have a 8 lb flat I want to cook. I will deff inject but I've also tossed around the idea of cooking it in a foil pan the whole time. Obviously I'll only get bark on top but that's ok with me. I'm just wondering if it would help retain some of the moisture? Also if I do cook it that way do you think I should cut the entire fat cap off so it's not simmering in all that grease? Thanks nick

jmoney7269 07-02-2013 06:41 AM

if its just a flat, its still probably gonna come out dry. i would cook the flat just like you do the packers. either a brisket is gonna be dry or juicy, the only way to combat that a little is injection and im still not sure that will help too much.

coastal 07-02-2013 07:17 AM

There is no reason a 8 pound flat has to come out dry.
I have used this recipe with good results but I modify it a bit depending on how the cook is going.
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/b...ipe/index.html

BBQfirefighter148 07-02-2013 07:32 AM

are you wrapping at 165 or so?

oldbill 07-02-2013 08:08 AM

Generally after three hours of cooking the meat has accepted all of the smoke that it's going to so just go ahead and wrap and work on preserving moisture at that point. It probably wouldn't hurt to inject with some low sodium beef broth and maybe do a dry brine. Dry brining is simply sprinkling liberally with salt the day before the cook. The meat will first expel water and you will see the meat get noticeably wetter, but then the water and the salt will be pulled back into the meat locking the moisture in. Here's an article on the subject, this also works really well for steaks by the way! Good Luck!!:-D http://www.amazingribs.com/recipes/r...y_brining.html P.S. I would leave the fat cap on or at least 1/8 inch of it. Depending on what type of cooker you have you may want to use the fat side as a heat shield and it also helps form that nice sticky bark that adds so much flavor!

Big_Alvin 07-02-2013 04:22 PM

i did a 7lb flat last weekend. put it on a 22" WSM with temp in the 260-ish range fat side up. i checked it at 6 hours and much to my surprise it was probe tender and internal temp was 195. So i pulled it, wrapped it in foil and placed it in a cooler and covered in towels. Carved it about 5 hours later and it was still hot and very juicy. i usually do whole packers but could only get a flat that day. no injection just dry rub.

Brian in Maine 07-02-2013 04:37 PM

This is how I cook flats, usually with good results.

Method for cooking a brisket flat

Start your coals.
While they are coming up to temp, (250*) wipe the brisket, slather it with Worcestershire sauce, then apply rub. When the cooker is up to temp, put the brisket on fat side down. (This lets the fat act as a heat shield, and keeps the meat from drying out.) Smoke for about 3 hrs. to an internal temp of 160* - 165*, then either wrap in foil, or put in a foil pan , fat side up , and add liquid, then seal with foil. (this can be beef broth, or any mixture that you like. I use three Tablespoons. of Steve Raichlins's honey balsamic glaze, (Here is the link)

mihttp://tvwbb.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/1980069052/m/5330004152

mixed with 1/4 cup of strong coffee.
If you want you can now finish in a 250* oven, as there will be no more smoke getting into the meat. cook the meat to an internal temp of 190* - 195 *at the thickest part of the flat. When a probe goes into the meat with no resistance the meat is done. Remove from the oven, and let set for at least an hour, without opening the foil. Slice across the grain.
defat the juices and serve, on the side.

FromthePitBBQ 07-02-2013 06:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Big_Alvin (Post 2536804)
i did a 7lb flat last weekend. put it on a 22" WSM with temp in the 260-ish range fat side up. i checked it at 6 hours and much to my surprise it was probe tender and internal temp was 195. So i pulled it, wrapped it in foil and placed it in a cooler and covered in towels. Carved it about 5 hours later and it was still hot and very juicy. i usually do whole packers but could only get a flat that day. no injection just dry rub.

^^^ What he said. I'm all about the KISS method.

That is exactly what I do, except on a UDS, and my brisket is very juicy.

If its drying out, it may come from being on too long. A flat will be pretty quick, compared to a packer. IMHO.

ajstrider 07-02-2013 08:35 PM

I like to do the salting method for a day or two before hand myself, adding more salt each day I do it. I also think that when you do this, it is important to let air flow underneath the meat so I put mine on a rack in a pan. The meat always comes out juicier when I do this. It never tastes salty either. I think the resting portion is also important to help keep it juicy. Injecting has always just made a mess for me, never accomplished much.


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