The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS.

The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS. (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/index.php)
-   Q-talk (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=5)
-   -   Tri-Tip Question? (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=163637)

DerHusker 06-18-2013 01:09 AM

Tri-Tip Question?
 
I’ve cooked quite a number of Tri-Tips but I’ve always purchased trimmed Tri-Tips before. Local market has USDA Choice trimmed Tri-Tips on sale for $3.99 and untrimmed Tri-Tips for $2.99 a pound. (Sorry to rub any salt into any non-California Tri-Tip lovers wounds) My question, is the $2.99 for untrimmed worth the effort or should I just pay the extra for trimmed. (Life is so hard with all these difficult decisions :mrgreen:)

TheGasman 06-18-2013 01:28 AM

Its a pretty big fat cap on an untrimmed piece. That fat could weigh close to a pound, so you might not be saving too much. Just my opinion of course.

spyre 06-18-2013 01:39 AM

I always do untrimmed and smoke it slow and then trim the fat after cooking. Always comes out awesome that way for me. Leaving it untrimmed lets you go slow with it without having to worry about it drying out.

I also brine it for a short amount of time in this which makes it real nice: http://www.sweetwaterspice.com/produ...i-tip-rib-bath
http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/014..._1024x1024.jpg

El Ropo 06-18-2013 06:13 AM

I used to always leave the fat cap on tri tips and figured it would help retain some moisture since almost all of the tts I was buying were select grade, and fairly lean. The last one I cooked was a fairly lean piece of meat as well, but I completely removed all the fat cap and the silverskin. I reverse seared it using a few pecan chunks and "ridge" charcoal briqs on my Weber OTS. Took it to 132 during the sear and cut it correctly. It was out of the park good with plenty of moisture and wonderful flavor.

Depending on how much fat was left on the untrimmed roasts, I'd make the decision on which one is the better deal. If the untrimmed ones looked better (more marbling, etc), I'd go that route and trim it myself. If the trimmed ones looks better, then I'd go that route. Sometimes a piece of meat just calls my name, and I'll reach for it. But I really liked the way the fully trimmed one turned out using reverse sear and keeping it med rare all the way through.

And cutting these things correctly makes a huge difference in tenderness. The youtube video showing how to cut the roast at the "seam" then cutting both pieces across the grain, and on the bias is the way to do it. You'll see many videos of people cutting tri tips in various ways, and I'm convinced the "seam" method is superior.

DerHusker 06-18-2013 07:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheGasman (Post 2519895)
Its a pretty big fat cap on an untrimmed piece. That fat could weigh close to a pound, so you might not be saving too much. Just my opinion of course.

Thanks. That's exactly what I'm concerned about plus the extra effort of having to trim.

DerHusker 06-18-2013 08:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by El Ropo (Post 2519929)
I used to always leave the fat cap on tri tips and figured it would help retain some moisture since almost all of the tts I was buying were select grade, and fairly lean. The last one I cooked was a fairly lean piece of meat as well, but I completely removed all the fat cap and the silverskin. I reverse seared it using a few pecan chunks and "ridge" charcoal briqs on my Weber OTS. Took it to 132 during the sear and cut it correctly. It was out of the park good with plenty of moisture and wonderful flavor.

Depending on how much fat was left on the untrimmed roasts, I'd make the decision on which one is the better deal. If the untrimmed ones looked better (more marbling, etc), I'd go that route and trim it myself. If the trimmed ones looks better, then I'd go that route. Sometimes a piece of meat just calls my name, and I'll reach for it. But I really liked the way the fully trimmed one turned out using reverse sear and keeping it med rare all the way through.

And cutting these things correctly makes a huge difference in tenderness. The youtube video showing how to cut the roast at the "seam" then cutting both pieces across the grain, and on the bias is the way to do it. You'll see many videos of people cutting tri tips in various ways, and I'm convinced the "seam" method is superior.

Thanks El Ropo. I love Tri-Tip and I've never cooked it any other way but reverse sear but I did cut it wrong the first 2 times. Then, in response to one of my Tri-Tip posts, someone posted the video your referring to (link below for others benefit) and it did make a big difference. Also one of the problems with the untrimmed ones is that they package them with the fat side up most of the time so you can’t see the actual roast. I have no idea who came up with this genius marketing idea! :wacko:



SmokinJohn 06-18-2013 08:21 AM

Depends on how lazy I am. I don't like paying meat prices for fat, but sometimes ya gotta do what you gotta do.

plakers 06-18-2013 08:24 AM

I always wonder about this when buying my tri-tips from Cash$Carry. Last cryovac weighed in at 16.2lbs for 5 of them and after trimming and packaging I was left with 13lb 9oz of roasts. I take most of fatcap off. That's about 83%.

Of course, you're results may vary.

DerHusker 06-18-2013 08:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by plakers (Post 2520058)
I always wonder about this when buying my tri-tips from Cash$Carry. Last cryovac weighed in at 16.2lbs for 5 of them and after trimming and packaging I was left with 13lb 9oz of roasts. I take most of fatcap off. That's about 83%.

Of course, you're results may vary.

Thanks. That's very helpful. How difficult was trimming the fat cap?


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:12 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise v2.6.0 Beta 4 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
2003 -2012 BBQ-Brethren Inc. All rights reserved. All Content and Flaming Pig Logo are registered and protected under U.S and International Copyright and Trademarks. Content Within this Website Is Property of BBQ Brethren Inc. Reproduction or alteration is strictly prohibited.