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-   -   Tri tip and T-Bone (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=161809)

JohnHB 05-26-2013 08:18 PM

Tri tip and T-Bone
 
I put six Waghu tri tips (9.5kg - 21lbs in total) on sous vide at 55C (131F) and will pulled out after 10 hours. I iced them down, put five in freezer and took one for Sunday's lunch. The Waghu was 9+ marbling and was on grain for 600 days.

In addition I have two T-bone steaks that are large weighing 1.5kg (3.3lb) each and three inches thick. These steak are Black Angus that have been grain feed or 300 days and the meat has been dry hung for 60 days. I vacuum packed the T-Bones with slt & pepper and sous vide cooked them for four hours at 55C (131F).
The T-Bones were wrapped in foil, then in a towel and into a foil cooler bag. We the drove to. Mate's place for lunch with the tri tip.
The tri tip was warmed in a low oven while we had canapés and a pasta starter.
We the moved out to the BBQ and commenced to brown the meat on high heat.

http://i1292.photobucket.com/albums/...ps9f66e815.jpg

http://i1292.photobucket.com/albums/...ps33fb6ff6.jpg

I sent in the T-Bones for carving whilst I finished the tri tip.

http://i1292.photobucket.com/albums/...ps9eaf5c1d.jpg

The meat looked great on carving:

http://i1292.photobucket.com/albums/...psa87b8b77.jpg

http://i1292.photobucket.com/albums/...ps6d117b4d.jpg

http://i1292.photobucket.com/albums/...ps43a853d2.jpg

http://i1292.photobucket.com/albums/...ps88d059f4.jpg

the meat was served with roast potatoes, a salad and a chimichurri sauce. The flavours and textures were terrific. Using sous vide is in effect the same type of process as reverse grilling. Seven out of eight thought the tri tip was the best.
John

buccaneer 05-26-2013 08:43 PM

Wow John, that sous vide works a treat.
It does look just like meat done "bake and brown", or "reverse sear" in the new hype renaming of the old technique!
The uniformity is excellent, except next to the bone, which is to be expected.
Gorgeous.

One thing, if it is helpful, I would have used more fat and a lower heat to sear for the finish.
As I say, just to be helpful, I would just love to be shoulder to shoulder with you at the table.
Titch gave me a sous vide thing to play with and I still havent got that happening, dammit.
I owe the guy too.
:icon_blush:

Oh, for our American cousins viewing, our Australian "T-Bone" may be called "Porterhouse" over there, if I have that right?

JohnHB 05-26-2013 08:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buccaneer (Post 2494269)
Wow John, that sous vide works a treat.
It does look just like meat done "bake and brown", or "reverse sear" in the new hype renaming of the old technique!
The uniformity is excellent, except next to the bone, which is to be expected.
Gorgeous.

One thing, if it is helpful, I would have used more fat and a lower heat to sear for the finish.
As I say, just to be helpful, I would just love to be shoulder to shoulder with you at the table.
Titch gave me a sous vide thing to play with and I still havent got that happening, dammit.
I owe the guy too.
:icon_blush:

Oh, for our American cousins viewing, our Australian "T-Bone" may be called "Porterhouse" over there, if I have that right?

I was trying to get grill lines on the meat. However my friends BBQ was struggling. I got an instant flare up and needed to keep moving around - the flat plate which wasn't what I wanted to use finished up the saviour. The crust on the tri tip was good but I have liked more on the T-Bones. Bl&$%#y great meat though.
John

Garrett 05-26-2013 09:08 PM

That looks outstanding. I really like the Tbone.

landarc 05-26-2013 09:12 PM

Nice hunks of meat John, great cooking

JONESY 05-26-2013 09:52 PM

Looks great, sounds like a fantastic time.

DerHusker 05-26-2013 11:47 PM

That meat looks fantastic. :hungry:

razorbacker 05-27-2013 12:46 AM

Wow! That takes some patience. Looks delicious!

martyleach 05-27-2013 12:54 AM

The meat looks great. I am just not a big sous vide fan. Maybe my taste buds just can't adjust to the texture of it. The flavor is great but the texture, meh. Very nice post though. Thanks!

JohnHB 05-27-2013 01:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by martyleach (Post 2494547)
The meat looks great. I am just not a big sous vide fan. Maybe my taste buds just can't adjust to the texture of it. The flavor is great but the texture, meh. Very nice post though. Thanks!

There are two stages in sous vide cooking. The first is getting up to temperature and the second is tenderness time.
Tenderness time is additional cooking time intended to make foods more tender. It is tacked on after the food reaches the desired final core temperature. The idea is that tough cuts of meat, such as short ribs, can be cooked well beyond the time they reach temperature. In some cases, this can be up to 72 hours. In less extreme cases, like pork chops for example, some people like to cook for an extra two to four hours in order to achieve the tenderness they desire without overcooking the chops the way traditional cooking methods would.
Marty if your sampling of sous vide has been of products that have been cooked too long in the tenderness time zone then I can understand your comment.
It is my view that I cooked the to products at an appropriate tenderness time and their texture was terrific.
John

AussieTitch 05-27-2013 01:29 AM

Looks the goods John, what bath are you using?I agree about the texture, it can be either right or wrong.
trial and lots of error has taught me that

JohnHB 05-27-2013 03:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AussieTitch (Post 2494567)
Looks the goods John, what bath are you using?I agree about the texture, it can be either right or wrong.
trial and lots of error has taught me that

Big pot & poly science professional.
http://i1292.photobucket.com/albums/...ps35af0156.jpg

John

AussieTitch 05-27-2013 03:03 AM

Pricey? is it a good controller?

frognot 05-27-2013 03:10 AM

Now that's a big ole steak there and it's looking mighty fine!

Hawg Father of Seoul 05-27-2013 04:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buccaneer (Post 2494269)
Oh, for our American cousins viewing, our Australian "T-Bone" may be called "Porterhouse" over there, if I have that right?

The Porterhouse is the end of the t-bone with a large portion of the tenderloin left on (at least 1.5 inch). You can continue to call them t-bones until the tenderloin just about disappears.

Nice looking meat. Yes, I would hit that, not call in the morning, and try again next week with some weak excuse.


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