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-   -   Anyone ever over rubbed their ribs? (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=157898)

Toast 04-04-2013 08:10 PM

Anyone ever over rubbed their ribs?
 
I poured it on thick the night before and then the next morning, covered them again before going on the WSM. They looked Great butt, I could have toned it down a tad.

How much is enough and when do you apply it?

Thanks for any and all input. :thumb:

aawa 04-04-2013 08:13 PM

I apply 1 coating of rub, then start the fire. After the fire is all set and getting thin blue smoke, I put the ribs onto the smoker.

---k--- 04-04-2013 08:16 PM

Done it once. I was trying out a new rub. It was Gary Wivott's rub that I purchased from Spice House in Chicago. I guess they made that batch a little spicy and I put it on shake and bake style. Oh man where they spicy hot. I think my wife spit out her first bite. I could only handle two bones before giving up. Wow.

These days, I skip the mustard and cover the meat good to the point where the natural color isn't obvious, but short of caking or clumping. I also rub only 2 to 4 hours prior. They come out good to my liking, but I'm not going to claim to be a professional.

Carbon 04-04-2013 08:19 PM

I've over-salted mine in the past.

landarc 04-04-2013 08:21 PM

I have over done it a few times. Either with a bad experimental blend or just over doing it. I find that my preferred method is a light rub before firing the pit up. Let the meat sit with the ceiling fan on, to aid in creating a pellicle. Then a second light layer over the pellicle. This lets me use the pellicle, which is a little sticky, to hold the second layer of rub on. Gets a better surface texture.

Toast 04-04-2013 08:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Carbon (Post 2435774)
I've over-salted mine in the past.

Oh btw, I did that too. Thanks.

Smokin Ribs 04-04-2013 08:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aawa (Post 2435766)
I apply 1 coating of rub, then start the fire. After the fire is all set and getting thin blue smoke, I put the ribs onto the smoker.

Thats exactly what i do

Toast 04-04-2013 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ---k--- (Post 2435771)
Done it once. I was trying out a new rub. It was Gary Wivott's rub that I purchased from Spice House in Chicago. I guess they made that batch a little spicy and I put it on shake and bake style. Oh man where they spicy hot. I think my wife spit out her first bite. I could only handle two bones before giving up. Wow.

These days, I skip the mustard and cover the meat good to the point where the natural color isn't obvious, but short of caking or clumping. I also rub only 2 to 4 hours prior. They come out good to my liking, but I'm not going to claim to be a professional.

I think you are a pro. But I don't do mustard and for the record, I don't boil them either. :becky:

Toast 04-04-2013 08:35 PM

What about applying the rub the night before then covering with plastic wrap in the fridge until the next day? It soaks in good. I did a heavy recoat right before putting them on.

landarc 04-04-2013 08:36 PM

I have done the rub the night before and wrap very tight in plastic wrap, I use a light coat, it works great. I like ribs done this way, but, it does require doing it the night before. Which often gets passed over around here.

Toast 04-04-2013 08:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by landarc (Post 2435777)
I have over done it a few times. Either with a bad experimental blend or just over doing it. I find that my preferred method is a light rub before firing the pit up. Let the meat sit with the ceiling fan on, to aid in creating a pellicle. Then a second light layer over the pellicle. This lets me use the pellicle, which is a little sticky, to hold the second layer of rub on. Gets a better surface texture.

I was using Simply Marvelous Sweet and Spicy. Could not not get enough. I OD'ed. Have not mentioned the taste though. They were GREAT! Only problem was that it was too much of a good thing.

El Ropo 04-04-2013 09:03 PM

This topic has been discussed in length before. Ribs have a large surface to mass ratio. Very easy to over rub. I go light on ribs. Save the heavy rub downs for things like pork butts/shoulders, chuckies and briskets. But some people go light on their brisket rubs too.

dawg 04-04-2013 09:05 PM

if your rub has a fare amount of salt in it and you rub and wrap the night before the cook they can and will turn out hammy tasting

HeSmellsLikeSmoke 04-04-2013 09:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by El Ropo (Post 2435833)
This topic has been discussed in length before. Ribs have a large surface to mass ratio. Very easy to over rub. I go light on ribs. Save the heavy rub downs for things like pork butts/shoulders, chuckies and briskets. But some people go light on their brisket rubs too.

To your point, I graduate the amount of rub to the taper of a brisket.
Thinner rub on the thinner end, thicker rub on the point end.

Vision 04-04-2013 09:14 PM

Yes, it's kind of easy to when using a new rub. One thing that helps me is only using a light amount of rub on the bone side.


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