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-   -   Missed the TD for pizza. A few words from my experience. (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=156183)

CharredApron 03-14-2013 10:14 PM

Missed the TD for pizza. A few words from my experience.
 
6 Attachment(s)
I am a former owner of an Italian pizza oven that I had imported from Italy. If it were not for the governing health dept. nutjobs where I live, I would still be in business today. That being said, after the Pizza Throwdown challange last week I felt compelled to impart some of my hard learned knowledge on this subject to those of you that wish to educate yourselves in the area of Neapolitan style pizza cooked in a wood fired oven . I hope that this is the correct forum to post this sort of info. I have always tried to teach " Simple" this is a very difficult subject for most cooks to embrace. We humans, by nature are complicated, so we tend to complicate recipes and cooking techniques as well. Please find listed below my simple pizza dough recipe.

NOTE: The ingredients (only 4)

500gr Molino Caputo Tipo 00 flour
325gr water (65% hydration)
10gr salt
3gr active dry yeast

Mix the dough in a stand mixer, by hand or in a bread machine. If you are using a stand mixer, mix it slowly for two minutes, faster for 5 minutes, and slow again for 2 minutes.

Cover the dough and let it rise for 1 1/2 - 2 hours, or until double. Punch it down and push out the air bubbles. Form the dough into a large ball, then cut it into three 275gr equal pieces.

Cover the dough and let it rise for 2 - 3-1/2 hours at room temperature, or until it has doubled in size. Punch it down gently. Form the dough into a large ball, then cut it into three 275gr equal pieces.

To make your individual dough balls, shape each piece of dough into a ball. Gently roll your dough into a ball, then stretch the top of the ball down and around the rest of the ball, until the outer layer wraps around the other side. Pinch the two ends together to make a smooth ball with a tight outer "skin." Set your ball seam-side down where it can rest. Dust your pizza balls with flour, and store them under a damp towel, in a proofing tray, or under plastic wrap. This will prevent the outside of the ball from drying out and creating a crust, and becoming difficult to work with. The top of the pizza ball should be soft and silky. They should look somewhat like this...

Heat: the oven needs to be at least 750 degrees F. That is relatively hard to achieve with a home oven. I tried this last week with my Kamado and learned the hard way. This weekend I will be building a custom, firebrick stone, and while cooking imploy the indirect method, but letting the temp rise to the desired 750 degree sweet spot.
Stay Simple!
Jed

bigabyte 03-14-2013 10:30 PM

Fark yeah!:thumb::hungry::cool::hail:

Kloogee 03-14-2013 10:32 PM

Those are some nice lookin' pies right there!

luke duke 03-14-2013 10:43 PM

Missed the TD for pizza. A few words from my experience.
 
Those pizzas look great, but at least give the Forno Bravo website some credit for the dough recipe.

http://www.fornobravo.com/pizza/pizza_dough.html

landarc 03-14-2013 11:22 PM

Nice work, thanks for the information.

JazzyBadger 03-15-2013 12:00 AM

Excellent advice, and it is most definitely the appropriate place to put this sort of stuff.
I've been working on my pizzas as of late. They're getting better, but still not where I want them.

beercuer 03-15-2013 01:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by luke duke (Post 2407949)
Those pizzas look great, but at least give the Forno Bravo website some credit for the dough recipe.

http://www.fornobravo.com/pizza/pizza_dough.html

Doh!

Still, nice pizzas, Hometruckin, and thanks for sharing with us. We used to do ours at 650 degrees when I worked in a pizzeria (back in the days of Moses). I remember one slow Sunday, when another employee forgot and left a pizza in the oven for a few hours! Hilarious!

buccaneer 03-15-2013 01:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hometruckin (Post 2407909)

Heat: the oven needs to be at least 750 degrees F. That is relatively hard to achieve with a home oven. I tried this last week with my Kamado and learned the hard way. This weekend I will be building a custom, firebrick stone, and while cooking imploy the indirect method, but letting the temp rise to the desired 750 degree sweet spot.
Stay Simple!
Jed

http://i1283.photobucket.com/albums/...psc1ce30d7.jpg
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/at...1&d=1363317172
I cooked that on a home BBQ, and temps were near 700f.
Note that the radiant heat consistency allowed for better control and less heat spots on mine compared to yours in the speciality oven.
They are both delicious looking but I'm not sure you are right about looking down on some of the high tech insulated cooking gear for backyard cookers.

My method of dough making required no kneading, provers or machines, and I think it is the equal of that one from the looks of it, certainly I haven't had better at commercial places.
:biggrin1:

rcbaughn 03-15-2013 02:49 AM

That upsets me about your pizza business. It's sad that the government can impede a business from staying in business with frivolous regulation measures. Seems that street vendors and traveling catering catch it hardest of all and they are usually the most cared for food businesses from what I've seen.

That said though, before I got into barbecue I spent endless, endless hours researching pizza and breads and trying to replicate them in my home oven and just never really got there with the pies. My breads turn out okay, but without a wood burning oven truly great pizza is gonna escape me. I'd love to have one that could dome 1100 and do a 60 second pie.

I like your dough recipe since it's quick and easy, but what do you think of slow fermentation and less kneading, and perhaps slow rise with sourdough starters? Ever worked with it at all? I've heard that the oxidation from lots of kneading impedes overall rise, but I haven't done enough work on it on my own, been too busy working on my Q really when I have the time and money. Anywho, just gonna get your take on all that slow fermentation jazz since you probably know a whole lot more than me from experience and age. Have a great one man, awesome looking pies you put out.

Oldbob 03-15-2013 04:07 AM

Great Lookin Pizza's Brother...Thanks for sharing the information !! :thumb:

chicagokp 03-15-2013 06:26 AM

Nice! Thanks for sharing the info!

Gnaws on Pigs 03-15-2013 06:30 AM

Great looking pizzas, thanks for the info!

buccaneer 03-15-2013 07:06 AM

Thanks for the info!:thumb:

CharredApron 03-15-2013 07:43 AM

Thanks Luke, The original recipe is from the following:
The True Neapolitan Pizza Association (Associazione Verace Pizza napoletana,AVPN) is a non-profit organization and was founded in June 1984 in Naples with its legal and operational headquarters. Its mission is to promote and protect in Italy and worldwide the “true Neapolitan pizza“ (“verace pizza napoletana“), i.e. the typical product made in accordance with the characteristics described in the International Regulations for obtaining a collective brand mark
Forno Bravo is not the originator. Thanks for your input. Forno Bravo does have a fine selection of recipes and instructional classes.

CharredApron 03-15-2013 07:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buccaneer (Post 2408069)
http://i1283.photobucket.com/albums/...psc1ce30d7.jpg
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/at...1&d=1363317172
I cooked that on a home BBQ, and temps were near 700f.
Note that the radiant heat consistency allowed for better control and less heat spots on mine compared to yours in the speciality oven.
They are both delicious looking but I'm not sure you are right about looking down on some of the high tech insulated cooking gear for backyard cookers.

My method of dough making required no kneading, provers or machines, and I think it is the equal of that one from the looks of it, certainly I haven't had better at commercial places.
:biggrin1:

NICE, I couldn't get better for sure. High tech insulated cooking gear is great, I simply meant " Simple ingredients" more often than not people tend to over compenstate by adding sugar, oil, enhancers etc to their dough. It is hard to learn simple! Thanks for your input,
Jed


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